Home
Videos uploaded by user “Ryan Beney”
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA (100-105) R&S - Physical Components. 02
 
10:29
Second of a Video Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1 v3 Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video we go over the Physical Components, both hosts and networking infrastructure. We touch base on where in the network each device may sit and how they’re represented. If you find this video to be helpful, please do leave a Like or better still, subscribe. This allows me to establish how helpful these videos are and if I should continue with this video series Want to give back? Buy me a Coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/VgtLD9lcK You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 76230 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) -  TCP Vs UDP .08
 
19:06
Eighth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1 v3 Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video we look at TCP the Transmissions Control Protocol and UDP the User Datagram Protocol. We start with an overview of UDP, finding out its an unreliable connectionless protocols but has the benefit of speed with its low overhead. UDP does not check if the destination exist or if it is capable of accepting the traffic, instead of just sends it and hopes it is received by the remote host Protocols which use UDP are: DNS - Port 53 TFTP - Port 69 RIP - Port 520 DHCP - Ports 67/68 We then dived into TCP and went over the benefits TCP offers being a connection-orientated protocol with the introduction of the 3-way handshake which allows TCP to put sequencing against all segments/bytes sent/received and from this sequencing method it is able to identify how much traffic was successfully sent and acknowledged. TCP will also ramp up the speed of which segments are sent/received until some acknowledgments are missing, once segments are not acknowledge this allows the sending device to scale down the speed of which segments are sent and in turn control the flow of traffic. All of this is possible (and much more) with it being a connection-orientated protocol. Protocols which use TCP are: HTTP - Port 80 HTTPS - Port 443 FTP - Ports 20-21 POP3 - Port 110 SMTP - Port 25 Then finished the video with an overview of the protocols side by side. It is important you remember and understand the differences between TCP and UDP along which which applications use which Layer 4 protocol and why that might be, along with which port number(s) they use. Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney
Views: 27261 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Switching PT.2 & ARP Overview .19
 
19:37
Nineteenth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: LAN Switching Fundamentals We start with a review with how a switch performs learning, flooding, filtering and forwarding to refresh our memory and help understand the behaviour of switching. After we drive into understanding how the address resolution protocol (ARP) works in detail between two devices within the same subnet I choose to include ARP alongside of switching overview as it really gives you an insight of how two technologies complement each other and to help you understand these two vital protocols Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 12374 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Subnetting Questions and Answers .12
 
17:37
Twelfth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1 v3 Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video I have a bunch of subnetting related examples from Binary conversations to working out the number of host per subnet within a given range. It is highly recommended to watch my previous two videos relating to IPv4 addressing/networking prior going through this question and answers video. Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney
Views: 29829 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105)  - Introduction. 01
 
22:27
First of a Video Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1 v3 Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video we go over the introduction, plan ahead, advice & tips, recommended resources and what I use to achieve certifications If you find this video to be helpful, please do leave a Like or better still, subscribe. This allows me to establish how helpful these videos are and if I should continue with this video series Useful links as promised: GNS3 - https://www.gns3.com/ Packet Tracer - https://www.netacad.com/about-networking-academy/packet-tracer/ Recommended Lab equipment: Low budget: Routers: Couple of 2611XM / 2651XM or 1841, ideally running 12.4 or 12.4T.. Switches: Couple of 2950 or even better, 3550 SMI or EMI High budget: (with CCNA/ part CCNP in mind) Routers: Couple of 2811 running 12.4 or higher, maybe 15.x Switches: 3550x2 2950x1 Useful links: http://www.ine.com/ https://www.cbtnuggets.com/ www.ciscopress.com/ https://www.safaribooksonline.com/ Thanks for Watching Want to give back? Buy me a Coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/VgtLD9lcK You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney
Views: 183537 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - TCP/IP & OSI Models. 05
 
14:26
Fifth of a Video Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1 v3 Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video we start to look at the TCP/IP models and OSI model. We first begin understanding why models are important to us as network engineers then jump into understand a brief history of ARPANET model, DOD, TCP/IP and OSI. We touch base on what a PDU is and why it is important to understand the correct terminology In our next section we’ll jump into understanding each layer in more detail and how the encapsulation process works in order to transfer data from one host to another. If you find this video to be helpful, please do leave a Like or better still, subscribe. This allows me to establish how helpful these videos are and if I should continue with this video series Want to give back? Buy me a Coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/VgtLD9lcK You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 41250 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Why VLANs?  Overview/Introduction .21
 
24:00
Twenty first Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: LAN Switching Fundamentals Now we have the fundamental of how a switch processes incoming frames to the correct interface(s) we start to dive into some of the more complex LAN topics starting with VLANS! In this video, we start by reviewing the challenges with networks which do not implement the VLANs and how these are resolved or improved when bringing VLANs into the network design. In our next video, we’ll continue with VLANs, understanding the difference between trunk ports, access ports and creating VLANs Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 13043 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Why Do We Need Routing? .29
 
21:16
Twenty Ninth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Routing Fundamentals Before we can dive into the routing topics we need to understand why we need routing? We know from the previous videos how communication works within a network using ARP and direct communication. We also know how basic routing works on a host, if the destination is on my network go directly to the destination, if it is not on my network go towards the default gateway. In this video, we talk about what happens when this type of traffic hits the default gateway (In this instance a router) and how communication may fail depending on the routing table. We setup a basic network on packet tracer and investigate how routers populate their routing tables with connected and local routes only to begin with and why this may not be enough if traffic is for a destination which is not directly connected Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 7343 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) -IPv4 Overview, Classful & Binary .10
 
29:21
Tenth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1 v3 Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video we start with an overview of IPv4, IPv4 addresses are 32 bits long broken up into 4 octets and represents in dotted decimal format. Each octet can be anything from 0 up to 255 and IP as a protocol is: -Unreliable - Delivery is not guaranteed, a packet may be lost, duplicated, delayed or delivered out of order -Connectionless - Each packet is treated independently from all others. A sequence of packets sent from one computer to another may travel over different paths, or some may be lost while others are delivered -Best-effort - Networks make the earnest attempt to deliver the packet, that is the network does not discard packets capriciously; unreliability arises only when resources are exhausted or underlying networks fail We then move onto Classful addressing discussing that there are 5 classes, Class A, B, C, D and E. Using network ID bits (Most significant bits in the first octet) PCs/devices are able to identify which IPs/Networks relate to which IP classes and in turn which network/host bits they need to be aware of in order to achieve communication. We then had a overview of how binary is translated into decimal then decimal into binary.. Lastly we said, since most companies needed more then 254 IPs class C wasn't enough and class B gave over 65,000 IPs which were too many, there needed to be another method which allowed IPs to broken further than what is offered with the classful method. This is where the classless & Subnetting elements came into play Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney
Views: 25365 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Port Security Overview .25
 
24:04
Twenty Fifth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: LAN Switching Fundamentals In this video, we start to approach the end of our LAN switching fundamental by discussing a security feature called ‘Port security’ we first talk about why port security is needed and what situation we should configure the feature. We said, port security can be configured on both static access and trunk ports, but not dynamic. However, most of the time you’ll be configuring this feature downstream on access ports towards your clients We had a discussion into the different violation by having a talk about protect, restrict and shutdown along with the configuration needed to apply port-security and verification tools we have to check the status of ports Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 10497 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - ACL - Access Control List - Part1 .45
 
24:01
Forty-Fifth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Infrastructure Services Our last topic before moving onto the last section of the CCENT is, ACL – Access control list. In this video we start by introducing ACLs and their use cases. What is an ACL? It’s a list of ACEs (Access Control Entries) used as a method of classification. For CCENT we need to learn how to create Standard and Extended ACLs to achieve a level of control to our routers and switches e.g. Who can SSH/Telnet to these devices and how ACLs can be used to control traffic flowing through our devices. Make sure you remember the different types of ACLs, Standard vs. extended plus how they work. Both have implicit DENY at the bottom which you can’t see when looking at the output of your ACL. This video was brief but to the point, in our next videos we’ll dive deeper into ACLs with more hands on. We only seen how to create Standard and Extended ACLs in Packet tracer, we didn’t attach these ACLs to VTY/Interfaces to make them effective. This is something we’ll do in later videos! Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 5669 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - DHCP - Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol -  Overview .37
 
19:28
Thirty-Seventh Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Infrastructure Services The first video within the Infrastructure Services section of the CCENT 100-105 blueprint and we jump straight into DHCP the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. We start by understanding that DHCP is a protocol which allows our host to automatically obtain an IP address when connecting to the network. We review the DORA process; Discover, Offer, Request and Acknowledgement. We said DHCP servers are normally inside the broadcast domain of the host they’re serving as DHCP heavily uses broadcast messages. However, it’s certainly possible to have a central DHCP server and setup devices in our network to relay the DHCP messages across the broadcast domain boundary to remove destinations. Remember DHCP can be setup in three different flavours on our Cisco routers: Client, Server and Relay. Ensure you understand the differences between them In our next video, we setup all the variants for DHCP Captures/Cheat Sheets - http://packetlife.net/ Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 7656 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Network Topologies. 04
 
22:32
The fourth video in a series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1 v3 Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video, we start by looking at a few topologies for both a SPN and Campus network, then discuss the difference between logical topology and physical. We take a look at Bus, Ring and Star, then dive into Hub and spoke, full-mesh, P2P and Point-to-multipoint then finish with an overall of two types of application behaviours Peer-to-peer and Client-Server. If you find this video to be helpful, please do leave a Like or better still, subscribe. This allows me to establish how helpful these videos are and if I should continue with this video series Want to give back? Buy me a Coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/VgtLD9lcK You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 50595 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - RIP - Routing Information Protocol. Part1 .35
 
29:33
Thirty-fifth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Routing Fundamentals Now we've covered dynamic routing, static routing, inter-vlan and route selection we need to dive a little deeper into the main routing protocol we need to learn for our CCENT / ICND1v3 studies which is RIP the routing information protocol. In this video we start by reviewing RIP, understanding it is an distance vector IGP which has the AD of 120 and uses HOP count as its metric. We look at the basic configuration required to get RIP up and running plus some extra commands. In our next video we'll jump into packet tracer and configure RIP, verify and troubleshoot Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 8071 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - How Switches Learn & Forward Frames .18
 
19:51
Eighteenth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: LAN Switching Fundamentals Following on from the previous videos within LAN switching we finally get a look at how switching is performed today. We first start by understand the goal of a switch answering why, what and how it forwards traffic along with the learning process. Starting with learning we said switches look at the source MAC address inside the L2 Ethernet frames and populates its CAM/MAC address table. Once its aware of the MAC addresses within the switching domain it’s able to perform standard unicast forwarding. But not all frames are standard unicast forwarding, we explore and discuss broadcast, multicast and unknown unicast frames. How different types of destination addresses inside the L2 frame changes how the switch treats the traffics. Does it forward? Flood? Or filter? Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 17342 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - CSMA/CD, Collision & Broadcast domains .16
 
17:39
Sixteenth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: LAN Switching Fundamentals In this video we start by talking about a Broadcast domain. We use an example of a broadcast message to understand how far that message will travel within the network (broadcast domain). We now know broadcast messages are stopped by routers or can be split up further using VLANs After broadcast domains we move into Collision domains. We said, every switch port is its own collision domain whereas with hubs, all their ports are within a single collision domain After understand Collision domains and the problems caused by multiple devices sharing the same medium we jumped into CSMA/CD how understand how Ethernet combats multiple devices trying to send on a shared medium CSMA/CD = Carrier sense multiple access collision detect CS = Carrier sense, PC/host has to perform 'Carrier sense' to determine if anyone is talking and if the wire is free to send traffic MA = Multiple access, Ethernet is called a multiple access medium simply because the original design was for a Bus topology to which everyone connected to the same think coax cable CD = Collision detection, While transmitting data it's possible another host may start transmitting at the same time, as when they both waited at the carrier sense, they both thought the wire was clear. If a collision occurs during the transmission. The host will send a 'Jam' signal to everyone on the collision domain asking everyone to be quiet. The transmission station will then goes through a Random back off (timer) and perform carrier sense before transmitting again. This is why you should not have too many devices on a single Ethernet segment. Also to note every time a collisions occur the back off timer will get bigger. Ethernet will try and put data on the wire around 16 times and eventually give up. Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney
Views: 14828 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - LAN Switching/Ethernet History Overview .15
 
18:23
Fifteenth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: LAN Switching Fundamentals In this video, we review how Ethernet / LAN switching has evolved over the years, starting with 10Base2 and 10Base5 which uses a single Coaxial cable, each device would connect using a Vampire tap or BNC connector in a bus topology fashion. Each device would share a single collision domain and had to connect to a single cable to speak on the LAN. From this a Hub was created, each device had its own cable and could extend further away from one another, however since the Hub operates at L1 It could only repeat the signals it received and in turn flood the signal out all its ports. As such the hub still offered a single collision domain but with more flexibility. Limitations exist in a repeater-based network. They arise from different causes and must be considered when extending a network with repeaters. The limitations include the following: • Shared bandwidth between devices • Specification constraints on the number of stations per segment • End-to-end distance capability Hubs only repeated the signals out of all its port as a frame was being received and the collision domain was growing with more and more devices. Collision were a big problem within the LAN segment A Bridge was created to help combat the collision domain issue by having memory. If a frame was received on a port the bridge will store the frame in the ports memory (Each port having its own) and wait until the wire is clear before sending it out to its destination using a MAC address lookup (Bridging Table) Big shortfalls of a bridge were primarily the amount of ports available, normally only 4-8 and all the ports were the same speed. Along with this Bridges were Software driven and not hardware. Finally Switches, unless Bridges these were hardware driven taken advantage of ASIC chips to take the load of the CPU allow us to extend into faster speeds and more ports along with other features like VLANs • Hundreds of ports • Ports which supported different speeds • Memory just like a Bridge • Hardware accelerated through the use of ASIC • Switch is a multiport bridge • Less/no collisions due to buffering/memory Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney
Views: 16168 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) -Subnet Mask Introduction, Classless Addressing/CIDR .11
 
34:55
Eleventh Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1 v3 Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video we start by picking up where we left off last time, fully understanding why Classful addressing was great for its time but needed to evolve into something else to meet the growing demands of the internet We start by with overview of what is a Subnet mask and why using this enables us to have a different method to determine where the network/host portions of an IP address start and stop Once understood we start to look at some scenarios briefly to establish how this new classless / CIDR addressing scheme helps resolve the problems highlighted at the start of the video In our next video we'll put together a bunch of subnetting questions and I'll show you how I would tackle them using the techniques outlined in this video Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney
Views: 25679 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Physical Components. Part2. 03
 
22:11
Third of a Video Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1 v3 Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video we continue to go over the Physical Components but shifting our attention to cables. We compare fibre & Copper then drive into the different types of copper and fibre cabling. We look at shielded, unshielded twisted pair, coaxial and RJ11, then straight into Fibre looking at FC, LC, SC, SFPs and how this looks on a Meraki Switch. Last but not least, couple of examples where we highlight the importance of using the correct cable for the right job! If you find this video to be helpful, please do leave a Like or better still, subscribe. This allows me to establish how helpful these videos are and if I should continue with this video series Want to give back? Buy me a Coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/VgtLD9lcK You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 59560 Ryan Beney
Static Cisco VTI VPN with FortiGate 5.x Guide
 
10:45
In this short video I show a brief overview of the step by step requirements to create a VPN between a Cisco IOS using VTI and FortiGate 5.2.x track using 0.0.0.0/0.0.0.0 Quick mode selectors (Single P2) Reason to configure your Cisco with this type of VPN: • Simplifies management---Customers can use the Cisco IOS® Software virtual tunnel constructs to configure an IPSec virtual tunnel interface, thus simplifying VPN configuration complexity, which translates into reduced costs because the need for local IT support is minimized. In addition, existing management applications that can monitor interfaces can be used for monitoring purposes. • Supports multicast encryption---Customers can use the Cisco IOS Software IPSec VTIs to transfer the multicast traffic, control traffic, or data traffic---for example, many voice and video applications---from one site to another securely. • Provides a routable interface---Cisco IOS Software IPSec VTIs can support all types of IP routing protocols. Customers can use these VTI capabilities to connect larger office environments---for example, a branch office, complete with a private branch exchange (PBX) extension. • Improves scaling---IPSec VTIs need fewer established security associations to cover different types of traffic, both unicast and multicast, thus enabling improved scaling. • Offers flexibility in defining features---An IPSec VTI is an encapsulation within its own interface. This offers flexibility of defining features to run on either the physical or the IPSec interface. You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney Cisco Configuration I used: ### crypto isakmp policy 1 encr des authentication pre-share group 2 crypto isakmp key test123 address 10.200.3.1 ! ! crypto ipsec transform-set Trans-1 esp-des esp-md5-hmac mode tunnel ! crypto ipsec profile testvpn set transform-set Trans-1 set pfs group2 interface Tunnel1 tunnel source 10.200.3.254 Tunnel ip add 192.168.0.1 tunnel mode ipsec ipv4 tunnel destination 10.200.3.1 tunnel protection ipsec profile testvpn ip route 172.16.0.0 255.255.255.0 tunnel 1 ###
Views: 7782 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) – IPv6 Overview .52
 
20:09
Fifty-second Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video, we start with a new topic called IPv6. First, we refresh our memory with IPv4 addresses, then dive into IPv6. We need to understand an IPv6 address is 128 bits long with every 16 bits separated by a Colon and presented as the Base16 hexadecimal. Ensure you understand how an IPv6 address is presented and the key bits of information highlighted in the video. After reviewing IPv6/IPv4 addressing we jump into the two main rules we need to remember and apply to our addresses which are 1) Leading zeros in each word/part/portion (16 bits) can be omitted & 2) Zero compression - A Single set of consecutive zeros can be replaced with double colon "::" We then apply these rules to an example IPv6 address and see how it compresses the output Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! Want to give back? Buy me a Coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/VgtLD9lcK You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 3764 Ryan Beney
Fortinet - FortiManager/NSE5 - Introduction & ADOMS. 01
 
26:44
First of a Video Series covering all elements of the NSE 5 Fortinet Network Security Expert/Analyst Certification Track. In this video we go over the introduction, plan ahead, how to get the most our of this series, ADOMs, differences & similarities between FortiManager & FortiAnalyser along with briefly logging into the FortiManager. If you find this video to be helpful, please do leave a Like or better still, subscribe. This allows me to establish how helpful these videos are and if I should continue with this video series Want to give back? Buy me a Coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/VgtLD9lcK You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeneyney
Views: 20703 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - NAT Overview. Part1 .39
 
21:05
Thirty-Nineth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Infrastructure Services In this video we start with a new topic called ‘NAT’ Network address translation. We start to understand why NAT is needed and how it helped slow down the exhaustion of IPv4 public space. After understanding NAT and its main purpose we explore other benfits of NAT, including the extra security it can provide and where it sits in the network. We learnt NAT is something which happens between the private LAN and public WAN. Finally we review the Cisco CCENT 100-105 blueprint to understand which types of NAT we need to learn in this section of videos and review the network topology we’ll be using in our next couple of videos where we’ll dive into the configuration and verification of the different types of NAT including; Static NAT, Dynamic NAT and of course PAT – Port address translation. Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 6174 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - LAN Vs. WAN, Designs & Data Transmission Types .09
 
27:47
Ninth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1 v3 Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video we start with a refresh of the difference between WAN and LAN then jump right into the two types of Data transmissions types. Unicast - One to One Multicast - One to Many Broadcast - One to all network designs outlined in the ICND1v3 exam blueprint: Three-tier and Collapse core. We dive into three-tier understand each tier in more depth. We said each tier should have The following capabilities Access Tier This tiers is where End users connect & usually provides L2 WAN connectivity between users It should have The following capabilities -Low cost per switch port -High port density -Scalable uplinks to higher layers -Resiliency through multiple links -Switching protocols like VLAN, STP etc IP Phones/Access points may extend the access layer Distribution Tier The distribution layer in the campus design has a unique role in which it acts as a services and control boundary between the access layer and the core. Both the access layer and the core are essentially dedicated special-purpose layers. The access layer is dedicated to meeting the functions of end-device connectivity, and the core layer is dedicated to providing nonstop connectivity across the entire campus network. The distribution layer, in contrast, serves multiple purposes. Devices in this layer sometimes called building distribution switch & should have the following capabilities - Aggregation of multiple access-layer devices -High L3 throughput for packet handling - Security & Policy based connectivity functions through ACLs or Packet filters -QoS -Scalable & Resilient high-speed links through access layer & core -Routing protocols like EIGRP, OSPF, RIP It's important to ensure the Distribution layer has enough bandwidth to process the total volume of traffic from all Connected devices. Core Tier The core is referred to as a backbone. Must be capable of switching traffic efficiently as possible. Core switches are sometimes called 'Campus switches' and should have the following capabilities -Very high throughput at L3/switching -No costly or unnecessary packet manipulation (ACLs/PBR) -Redundancy or resilience for high availability -Advance QoS No directly attached user or server connections We then had a chat about Collapse cores, saying this is where we only have a two tier.. An access and distribution/core but the downside being due to no central place connecting all your distribution switches you'll end up with a full mesh in the middle which can stump your growth Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney
Views: 31357 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Routing Topics Overview .27
 
16:20
Twenty Seventh Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Routing Fundamentals We finally start to come onto the fun stuff in this first video within the routing fundamentals. We’ll begin by outing some of the questions we’ll soon know the answers as we cover the next 25-30% of the CCENT / ICND1v3 blueprint. This video is also an opportunity to us to refresh our memory of how traffic traverses off the local segment using the default gateway and how protocols like ARP to enable the creation of the Layer 2 frame. It is important you’ve watched both the OSI videos and ARP overviews prior continuing with the Routing fundamentals section Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney
Views: 7889 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Public Vs Private IP Addresses, NAT/PAT, Reserved IPs .13
 
26:30
Thirteenth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video we start with a overview of public IP addressing and why it is important public IP's are globally unique, also touch on the difference between Static IP's Vs Dynamic IP's Brief discussion around IANA and one of their jobs of keeping track of the unique public IP's assigned to the RIR all over the world and how/why you would want to own your own IP's rather than leasing from an ISP After public we compare this to Private IP's and touch on IETF and RFC 1918 then show some examples of where and why we need and use Private addressing along with a brief discussion of NAT/PAT Lastly we review some reserved IP addresses. -APIPA - Automatic Private Internet Protocol Address which is mainly a Windows function that provides DHCP autoconfiguration addressing. APIPA assigns a class B IP address from 169.254.0.0 to 169.254.255.255 to the client when a DHCP server is either permanently or temporarily unavailable. - Loopback - An address that sends outgoing signals back to the same computer for testing. In a TCP/IP network, the loopback IP address is 127.0.0.1, and pinging this address will always return a reply unless the firewall prevents it. -Default or unknown address - This is a 0.0.0.0 IP address and used if you do not have an IP i.e. a discover during the DHCP DORA process or a default gateway on a routing table Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney
Views: 22063 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Inter-VLAN Routing (Router On A Stick) .34
 
24:16
Thirty-Fourth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Routing Fundamentals In this video we pull together our VLAN knowledge learnt from the LAN switching section and the routing knowledge learnt so far through the routing fundamentals section and tackle a topic called inter-vlan routing or sometimes referred to as Router on a stick (ROAS) The concept is simple, we have VLANs which work at Layer 2 to help break up broadcast domains and normally within each VLAN we have a single subnet. As we know, if we want to communicate to another subnet we need to route the traffic through a router. In this video, we review how our LAN could connect into a single router and enable traffic to be routed between interfaces on the router to/from different VLANs. We start by reviewing VLANs and what we may need to achieve ROAS then jump into packet tracer to configure and verify. Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 6852 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Duplex & Speed Overview / Configuration .17
 
24:47
Seventeenth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: LAN Switching Fundamentals In this video, we finally get a look and feel into the Cisco CLI when we talk about Duplex and speed in depth. We start by going over what is Duplex and why we have it today along with the available options including full duplex, half duplex and autonegoation. After reviewing Duplex, we jump into some Cisco switches and start to simulate some of the problems which is caused by mismatch in duplex and how to resolve them. Our last topic in the video is speed. We said this command tends to go hand in hand with Duplex but how speed is negotiated is a little different as it uses physical attributes of the circuit. After an overview of speed, we jumped back into the Cisco’s and went through a range of scenarios to show the behaviour of the speed command Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 15254 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Path Selection (Routing table, AD, Metric) .33
 
23:32
Thirty-Third Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Routing Fundamentals So far in the course we have discussed, why routing is needed along with static and dynamic routing. Now it is time to understand how the router is making the decision on a per hop basis to reach the destination In this video, we look at the three-step process the router follows to decide which path. 1. Longest match / More specific route – First we pick the path with more bits in common with the destination or the more specific network. 2.Lowest Administrative distance – Second, providing we learn the same length network from two various sources we compare our sources using the AD. 3.Lowest Metric – If the sources of the routing information is the same i.e. both RIP routes we check the metric within that routing protocol to determine the best path Once we understand why a path has been installed into the routing table, we can only then change the output. For example, if a Path is being installed because of the lower AD, changing the metric will not influence the path selection. After looking at the three-step process in detail, we finish with an overview of the routing table and go over an example of path selection Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 7978 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - VLANs Part3. Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP) .23
 
26:08
Twenty third Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: LAN Switching Fundamentals In this video we dive deeper into understanding trunking by looking at the dynamic trunking protocol (DTP). We first look at some key facts regarding the protocol and what it allows us to achieve then review the modes. -Cisco proprietary feature allowing switches to negotiate trunks dynamically -On by default, even when trunks are statically configured -Depending on Switch model/make ISL is normally the default but now a days it is Dot1q -Administrate Mode Vs.Operational Mode -DTP carries VTP information There are five different modes. -Access (End clients) -Trunk (Hard set to trunk) -Dynamic Auto (Passively accepts DTP packets, prefers to be access port) -Dynamic Desirable (Actively send DTP packets, prefers to be a trunk port) -Non-negotiate (Turn off DTP) We also spent some time reviewing VTP as an overview along with a further discussion around trunks and access ports Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 12302 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Err-disable Recovery Overview & LAN Recap .26
 
15:56
Twenty Sixth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: LAN Switching Fundamentals In this video, we carry on with the switching fundamentals and something which relates to port security called the err-disable recovery feature. We start by understanding what the error disable recovery allows us to achieve along with configuration and verification. We said error disable recovery feature allows us to automatically enable a port which was disabled by particular features i.e. port security violation We then finish the video by discussing what we have covered so far, and what is to come over the next couple of videos Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 7837 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - DNS - Domain Name System Overview .43
 
21:37
Forty-Third Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Infrastructure Services In this video, we start a new topic, DNS – Domain Name System. We start by understanding what is DNS, why it uses UDP and port 53 plus why the technology was invented. We then jump into reviewing how DNS changes the communication and why DNS resolution is needed to create the Layer 3 header. Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 4390 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) PAT Configuration - Part3 .41
 
19:01
Forty-first Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Infrastructure Services In this video, we continue with NAT but this time looking at PAT within Packet Tracer. We use the same topology as we did in Video 40 where we configured Static NAT but this time takes it a step further and explore why PAT is needed. First, we confirm the network is configured with the correct IPs and interfaces are in the correct state. Add DHCP to allow our host to obtain IPs then start the process of NAT. 1 – Add IP NAT inside / IP NAT outside on the correct interfaces 2 – Create an ACL with a single ACE which matches the private IP range 3 – Configure a global IP NAT statement which matches the ACL, public interface and with the key work overload We notice once configured and traffic was flowing the IP NAT translation table had entries which overlapped destination and source IPs but each flow/session was kept unique through the use of source port numbers. Even when the router notice source port numbers were not unique it was able to change it locally to help session remain unique. Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 4774 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - VLANs Part2. Access Ports & Trunks Ports .22
 
32:18
Twenty second Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: LAN Switching Fundamentals Carrying on from Video 21 which introduced us into why we might use VLANs and what problems they solved, this video dives into VLANs themselves. First with an overview of the amount of VLANs we can create both standard VLAN range and extended VLAN range, also legacy VLANs and this concept of VLAN1. We then jump into the Cisco CLI and create a few VLANs, name them and verify our actions. We review access ports and trunk ports, explaining where they sit in the network and how to configure and verify For the exam, its vital you know the following: • VLAN ranges (Standard, extended and legacy) • Why we use VLANs • What problems did VLANs solve • How to create VLANs • How to create access ports and trunk ports • Difference between trunk and access ports along with where we should use them • Verify VLANs, access ports, trunk ports and interface configurations Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 14012 Ryan Beney
CCENT ICND1/ICND2 CCNA - Exam and Video - Q&A Overview .01 (BONUS)
 
15:47
First Q&A regarding the CCENT/CCNA course. In this non-technical Q&A we talked about the certification, advice and my recommendations along with setting the scene for future Q&A's. If you find this Q&A helpful and want more technical or non-technical, leave a comment! Don't forget to share the video or support by liking and subscribing! ################### Questions In this Video: ################### 1# What should I use for my studying? 2# How much is the exam? What is the difference between ICND1, ICND2, CCENT and CCNA 3# What topics are on the CCENT Exam? 4# How long should I study? 5# How many videos will be in the CCENT? 6# Do you have any Advice? 7# Are there more videos to come? 8# Are you going to do ICND2 videos? ###### Books ###### 1) CCENT/CCNA ICND1 100-105 Official Cert Guide (Wendell Odom) 2) CCENT ICND1 Study Guide: Exam 100-105 (Todd Lammle) ###### Training Video Recommendations: ###### - INE: http://www.ine.com - CBT Nuggets : http://www.cbtnuggets.com - Lazario Diaz: https://www.udemy.com/cisco-ccna-ccent-or-icnd1-100-105-the-complete-course/ -Andrew Crouthamel: https://www.youtube.com/user/ShrikeCast -Networking: https://www.youtube.com/user/NetworKingInc Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 18092 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) – DTP, CDP, LLDP! – Practical .24
 
30:38
Twenty fourth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: LAN Switching Fundamentals Following on from our previous video where we discussed DTP the dynamic trunking protocol in detail, this video we take it one step further and dive into the Cisco CLI configuring a few options and confirming the output. It is highly recommended you watch the video prior before diving into this hands on session. After DTP we went into the network discovery protocols which operate at layer 2 within the OSI model which are CDP and LLDP CDP - Cisco Discovery Protocol -Cisco Proprietary -Layer 2 Protocol for Neighbor discovery -Provides information of Platform, interface, IP address and OS version -On by default -CDP timer (60 seconds) -CDP Hold timer (180 seconds) LLDP - Link Layer Discovery Protocol -Open Standard -Between venders -Disabled by default -LLDP Hold time (120 seconds) -LLDP timer (30 seconds) Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 11803 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Static and Dynamic Routing .30
 
24:06
Thirtieth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Routing Fundamentals In the previous video, we discovered why routing was needed, in this video we look at the two options we have to achieve end-to-end reachability. First, we talk about Static routing, understanding when and why you’ll use it along with some examples of the configuration and verification commands. We said static routing is used in a small basic designs and can be used to achieve traffic engineering. After static routing we went into Dynamic routing, comparing this to static, understanding the different between IGP and EGP plus reviewing some basic RIP configuration We know now why routing is needed, what options we have and how they help us achieve connectivity. In this video we'll focus on implementing some of the basic routing then dive deeper into route selection Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 8790 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Overview on FLSM, SLSM, VLSM & CIDR .14
 
19:05
Fourteenth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video regarding IPv4 addressing, we take a look at all the terminology outlined in the videos so far and in documentation you may have read. We go back to the early 1980s and talk about Classful addressing where classes were used and a subnet mask didn’t exist, instead the first couple of bits (most significant bits) were used to signify the class From this we move into the mid 1980’s which Is when a subnet mask is introduced to enable further subnetting within our classful ranges using one or more of the following schemes: FLSM, SLSM and depending on the deployment/equipment/ knowledge – VLSM, which was known at the time as flexible subnet mask As growth continued throughout time, it was clear we needed to move away from Classful addressing and as such in 1993 CIDR was released allowing us to break away from classful addressing into classless. This gave us the ability to subnet beyond the classful boundary VLSM was finally released as a recognised way to subnet a IP address and as of today the use of both CIDR and VLSM is used to ensure we’re getting the most out of the IPv4 address space ## Useful links / References ## Classful Addressing Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7Uj6lxL_Yk Subnetting introduction Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMCwt8uwkI4 Subnetting Q&A Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhSnw23xP7Y RFC: 791: https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc791 RFC: 950: https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc950 RFC: 1519: https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1519 RFC: 1878: https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1878 Books: CCIE Routing and Switching V5.0 Official Cert Guide TCP/ IP illustrated CCNP ROUTE Official Cert Guide TCP/IP Guide Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney
Views: 15356 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - ARP & Switching Practical .20
 
22:41
Twentieth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: LAN Switching Fundamentals This is our last video regarding switching basics and the ARP process. In this video, we take what we learnt from the two pervious videos and put it into practice We review how communication works between two host within the same subnet and how the ARP reply and request help us obtain the L2 information for building our frames. We look at the debug output of the ARP communication and a few Wireshark captures for a more in-depth view at the ARP frames It is highly recommended you watch the previous two videos before going over the practical element outlined in this video ## LINKS / DOWNLOADS ## https://www.wireshark.org -- Allows you to capture packets and view downloaded captures http://chrissanders.org/packet-captures/ --- Example Wireshark downloads ### Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 12056 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - OSI Model Part 3. 07
 
23:20
Seventh Video in a series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1 v3 Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals Continuing with the OSI model overview, we start with reviewing the application, presentation, session and transport. Then move into network, data-link and physical. OSI Overview: Networking Layer Routing protocols: These are protocols which routers use to exchange routes/subnets with one another. Protocols which sit here are RIP, EIGRP, OSPF, BGP etc. Routed protocols: These are protocols which routers exchange: IPv4, IPv6, IPX, Appletalk, ICMP etc. At the networking layers we're introduced to a key piece of hardware called a router, briefly understand what is an IP address, and last but not least don't forget a PDU for the Network Layer is a Packet Data-Link Layer Most common L2 Protocol is Ethernet which uses MAC address, also called: Burned in address, Physical Address, Hardware address. These are 48 bit addresses represented in Hexadecimal half of which is used for the OUI. Other Protocols at the DL layer include: PPP, HDLC, ATM, ARP and many more also, don't forget a PDU for DL Layer is a Frame. Switches tend to work at DL Layer but can work at many layers within the OSI depending on their capabilities Physical Layer The physical layer defines the electrical, mechanical, procedural, and functional specifications for activating, maintaining, and deactivating the physical link between communicating network systems. Physical layer specifications also define characteristics such as voltage levels, timing of voltage changes, physical data rates, maximum transmission distances, and physical connectors. Physical layer implementations can be categorized as either LAN or WAN specifications. If you find this video to be helpful, please do leave a Like or better still, subscribe. This allows me to establish how helpful these videos are and if I should continue with this video series Want to give back? Buy me a Coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/VgtLD9lcK You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 28373 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - DHCP - Configuration (Server, Client & Relay) .38
 
23:17
Thirty-Eighth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Infrastructure Services Carrying on from the previous video regarding DHCP overview, we now go over the configuration required to setup a Cisco for DHCP Server, DHCP client, and DHCP Relay. We start with DHCP server, configuring a router with a DHCP pool, default gateway, DNS and DHCP exclusions. Once configured we jump on a PC and request the local NIC to obtain an IP via DHCP and sure enough, an IP is given to the client. Further to this, we configure a Cisco also within the same broadcast domain as a client using the DHCP option under the interface configuration. Make sure you know the configuration required for DHCP server and Client, follow along with me in the video using your own copy of packet tracer (It's free!) Once server and client are successfully setups we expand our horizon with Relay. DHCP Relay is used when we want to take advantage of a local DHCP server which sits outside the broadcast domain. We can turn our broadcast DHCP messages into unicast and send them across the network. Again, ensure you understand the high-level concepts of DHCP relay and how to configure it using the helper-address Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 6922 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Encapsulation and Decapsulation (Packet rewrite) .28
 
35:58
Twenty Eighth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Routing Fundamentals Our first routing fundamentals topics is to discuss the encapsulation and Decapsulation which happens on a per hop basis across the network, this is something referred to as packet rewrite. We’ve first set the scene by looking at the network topology then reviewed the IPs/MAC addresses assigned across the network. We know already about ARP, routing overview, OSI model, IP addresses and a few other topics all of which comes together to describe this packet rewrite process We said routers Encapsulate/Decapsulate on a per hop basis, whereas switches only inspect the layer 2 frame and switch towards the correct egress port without modifying the header. During the Decapsulation process the router first looks at the L2 destination MAC address to determine if it is for the receiving interface, once confirmed the L2 header and trailer is removed. Next the router inspects the L3 header for the destination IP address then consult the routing table for the correct egress interface. Once the router knows the interface, the packet is switched internally to the correct egress port, at this point the TTL is decremented and L2 resolution occurs to find the next hop MAC address, which may require ARP. Once the MAC address is found the new L2 header with the new CRC/FCS trailer. Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 12662 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - NAT with IP Pools Configuration - Part4 .42
 
11:27
Forty-Second Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Infrastructure Services In this video, we continue with NAT/PAT but how we can introduce multiple public IPs using a IP Pool First, we confirm the network is configured with the correct IPs and interfaces are in the correct state. Once confirmed we start our configuration, at first – Same as you’ve seen previously 1 – Add IP NAT inside / IP NAT outside on the correct interfaces 2 – Create an ACL with a single ACE which matches the private IP range 3 – Create an IP Pool with the range of public IPs we which to use for our NAT 4 – Link everything together using the IP NAT global command. We notice once configured and traffic was flowing the IP NAT translation table had entries which overlapped destination and source IPs, but each flow/session was kept unique using source port numbers. However, we know there are only so many unique sessions per IP address and some environments have 1000s of users with 100s or 1000s or sessions. Keeping these unique we’ll need to use more than one IP for the PAT process, therefore we created the IP NAT Pool in this video. Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 3905 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) – IPv6 Addresses - Part 2 .53
 
27:02
Fifty-third Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Network Fundamentals In this video we continue with IPv6, first reviewing the different types of IPv6 addresses. We look at Link-local FE80 addresses and how they're automatically assigned to each NIC and used for local communication across the wire. We even jump into couple of Cisco's and configure RIPNG to confirm link-locals are used in the exchanging of routes. Unique Local address was the next address type we discuss. Understanding it always starts with FC00::/7 and not globally routable. Very similar to our IPv4 private addresses (RFC 1918). Global unicast - These are our public IP space of which 2000::/3 has been reserved and within this range, 2001::/16 is currently being given out. Finally, we touched on Multicast case and some important multicast IPs such as FF02::1 and FF02::2. After going through the slide we jump into the Cisco’s to configure some IPv6 using EUI-64 and Wireshark to review the packets Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! Want to give back? Buy me a Coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/VgtLD9lcK You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 4259 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Dynamic Routing Overview & Basic RIP .32
 
29:53
Thirty-Second Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Routing Fundamentals In the previous video, we reviewed static routing and before that why we need routing and the options we have. In this video, we start by diving into dynamic routing in more detail understand what we need to know for the CCENT / ICND1 exam and why we may use it over static routing. After we review the configuration and verification in order to implement dynamic routing with most of our focus on RIP. Routing information protocol (RIP) is the only dynamic routing protocol within the CCENT / ICND1 that we need to be able to configure and verify. But it is vital we understand there are other protocols how some basic information relating to them Lastly, just like in our static routing video. We jump into Packet tracer and configure RIP to achieve end to end reachability. Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 6795 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Static Routing Overview (Floating, AD, Next-hop) .31
 
32:09
Thirty-First Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Routing Fundamentals In the previous video, we looked at our options and compared static routing and dynamic routing. In this video, we dive deeper into understanding static routing First, we go over a few essential elements of static routing. Such as understanding when you use next-hop IPs Vs. local interfaces within your IP Route statements. We discussed the difference between broadcast and non-broadcast networks and why this plays a big part in our static route creation. Then moved onto reviewing floating statics, where we can use the increase in AD to allow a static route to take over if a more preferred route is lost. We investigated recursion, what this is and how it can affect our routing decisions. We lastly jumped into packet tracer, reviewed a small network and added static routing to ensure end-to-end reachability, along with testing our some of the theory we went over i.e. understanding recursion Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 8584 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) – Telnet, SSH & Banners - Part 1 .50
 
21:51
Fiftieth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Infrastructure Maintenance In this Video we turn our focus onto the telnet protocol, something we’ve talked quite a few times but not enough for the ICND1. We need to understand telnet uses port 23 and TCP at Layer 4. However, one key downside to telnet is any communication is sent in clear text. In fact, in the end of the video we investigate the clear text communication using Wireshark. Its important you understand the difference between user EXEC and Privilege EXEC modes and how different telnet configuration can affect this. We touch base on the line VTY configuration, privilege level 15, login local and use of enable secret. Make sure you spend some time playing around with VTY configuration and understanding the error message you may be presented with when trying to telnet to a device with missing configuration. Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! Want to give back? Buy me a Coffee - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/VgtLD9lcK You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 3487 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - DNS - Domain Name System - Part2 .44
 
17:44
Forty-Fourth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Infrastructure Services In this video we carry on with the DNS topic, first jumping into packet tracer to simulate what we talked about in the previous video to ensure we really do understand why DNS is needed and how it effects our communication. We then investigate the Cisco commands required for DNS at the CCENT level. IP domain-lookup – This command turns on the DNS resolution IP name-server – This command allows you to specify the DNS server, if nothing is specified it tries using L3 broadcast to find a DNS server on the locally connected networks IP Host – Allows you to create locally/static DNS entries. Make sure you spend time building these labs in Packet tracer to really learn how DNS works! Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 3380 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) - Packet Tracer Vs. GNS3 and Physical Hardware .02 (BONUS)
 
14:49
In this video we have a look at the difference between Packet tracer, GNS3 and physical hardware. We start by looking at the Cisco Network Academy and what it offers us, plus a look into their Certification tracks and compare this with CompTIAs certification roadmap. We discuss the free Cisco Packet tracer course and how you can obtain a copy of packet tracer plus attend a free 1 hour course to help use the software. links to both CompTIA and Cisco Network Academy are below: ---------------------- CompTIA Roadmap ---------------------- https://certification.comptia.org/docs/default-source/downloadablefiles/it-certification-roadmap.pdf?sfvrsn=2 ---------------------- Cisco Network Academy (Packet Tracer) ---------------------- https://www.netacad.com/about-networking-academy/packet-tracer/ After this, we dive into understanding the other options available which are both GNS3 and Physical hardware. Links for GNS3 and the CBT Nuggets video regarding hardware can be found below: ---------------------- CBT Nuggets - Building a CCNA Home Lab ---------------------- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QAS5_Wzolfs&t=590s ---------------------- GNS3 - https://www.gns3.com/ ---------------------- Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 6559 Ryan Beney
Cisco - CCENT/CCNA R&S (100-105) – Upgrading IOS on a Cisco 887 .49
 
22:54
Forty-Ninth Video in a Series covering all elements of The Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) 100-105 ICND1v3 which is the first part of the CCNA certification. Blueprint Section: Infrastructure Maintenance Moving on from the previous video and what we learnt – Its time to use these skills and upgrade a Cisco! Here we have a Cisco 887 running some older IOS image. Lets login to Cisco’s website, download the latest image and have a play! We first use SolarWinds TFTP application to transfer over the image from my local PC. Once transferred and verified we use the boot command to set which IOS to load and ensure it correctly does. After we delete the current IOS and reload to see how the box reacts. Lastly, we investigate how different transferring files with USB is compared to TFTP Solarwinds TFTP Software: https://solarwinds-tftp-server.en.softonic.com/ Thanks for Watching and be sure to like and subscribe! You can find me on: Twitter - @RyanBeney - https://twitter.com/ryanbeney Linkedin - /RyanBeney - https://uk.linkedin.com/in/ryanbeney G+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+RyanBeney
Views: 3401 Ryan Beney