Home
Videos uploaded by user “Council on Foreign Relations”
Lessons Learned: General MacArthur's Dismissal
 
06:21
On April 11, 1951, President Harry Truman announced with "deep regret" that he had dismissed General Douglas MacArthur as commanding general of U.S. forces in the Korean War. Truman's decision came after MacArthur repeatedly criticized the president's policies, advocating a more aggressive strategy even as Truman sought to limit the war. After his announcement, the president faced intense criticism while MacArthur returned home to a hero's welcome, including an address to a joint session of Congress and a ticker-tape parade through New York City in his honor. However, the controversy slowly subsided as most Americans--and U.S. generals--made it clear that they opposed MacArthur's military strategy. General Omar Bradley famously said that MacArthur's policies "would involve us in the wrong war, at the wrong place, at the wrong time, and with the wrong enemy." James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, argues that the firing of MacArthur shows that "presidents can be justified in overruling the military advice of even their most decorated generals." That lesson continues to apply today, he says. When President Obama receives recommendations from his generals concerning the war in Afghanistan, he "may accept those recommendations, revise them, or reject them entirely." "That is the meaning of the principle of civilian control of the military," Lindsay argues, "and it's what the framers intended when they made the president 'commander-in-chief.'" This video is part of Lessons Learned with James M. Lindsay, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 http://www.cfr.org/us-strategy-and-politics/lessons-learned-general-macarthurs-dismissal/p27905
How Globalization Affects Transnational Crime
 
09:38
As world leaders increasingly debate drug legalization, CFR's Stewart Patrick and Phil Williams of the University of Pittsburgh discuss the explosion of transnational crime in a globalized world: - "Transnational criminals have been one of the biggest beneficiaries of globalization," Williams says. Globalization facilitates international trade but also increases the difficulty of regulating global trade, he says; traffickers and smugglers have exploited this. Williams adds that globalization has increased inequality around the globe, and that "its disruptive effect has actually caused people to have to go into organized crime and operate in illicit markets as coping mechanisms." - The global financial system has undergone widespread deregulation since the 1970s, allowing illicit actors to launder the proceeds of crime more easily, Williams says. "We've got some reregulation to try to deal with money laundering ... but it's not particularly effective," he adds. - Terrorists, insurgents, and warlords all rely on illegal activities as a funding mechanism, says Williams. "Sometimes, when they engage in a criminal activity, they come into contact with criminal organizations, but for the most part, the direct group-to-group link is not that important. It's just a market activity or a supplier relationship," he notes, disputing the idea of a "crime-terror nexus." - "There's no single model of a criminal organization," Williams says. The conventional wisdom that criminal networks have abandoned their hierarchical structure, he says, obscures the fact that criminals adopt myriad distinct structures depending on their circumstances--and some of them remain hierarchical. - Illicit networks are challenging to states because states are militarily and diplomatically organized to deal with other states. Governments around the world "have found it very hard to adapt to non-state or sovereignty-free actors," Williams says. This video is part of The Internationalist, a series dedicated to in-depth discussions about leveraging multilateral cooperation to meet today's transnational challenges. http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/internationalist-08/p28403
Immigration Policy and the U.S. Presidential Election
 
03:07
U.S. immigration policy has been a touchstone of political debate for decades as policymakers consider U.S. labor demands and border security concerns. Comprehensive immigration reform has eluded Washington for years. Meanwhile, the fates of the estimated eleven million undocumented immigrants in the country, as well as future rules for legal migration, lie in the balance. This video is the first in a CFR series highlighting the top foreign policy priorities that the next President of the United States will face. Subscribe to CFR's YouTube channel to get new episodes: https://www.youtube.com/cfr See where the 2016 Presidential candidates stand on immigration and all other foreign policy issues: http://on.cfr.org/1GKeHji Learn more about the U.S. Immigration Debate: http://on.cfr.org/1kSZgLK Read the CFR report on Managing Illegal Immigration: http://on.cfr.org/1MUuyIN
Lessons Learned: Richard Nixon Goes to China
 
04:26
On February 17, 1972, President Richard Nixon departed on a historic trip to China. The United States had no formal diplomatic relationship with China since Mao Zedong's communist government came to power in 1949. Nixon's trip put relations between the two countries on an entirely different track, and changed the face of international relations during the Cold War. Nixon would call it the "week that changed the world." James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, says that Nixon's trip clearly demonstrates the idea that diplomacy matters in foreign policy. History, he says, is "usually told as the story of epic battles and courageous last stands." But diplomacy plays just as great a historical role, he argues, and remains vital today for dealing with countries as diverse as China, Iran, or Myanmar. This video is part of Lessons Learned, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 http://www.cfr.org/us-strategy-and-politics/lessons-learned-nixon-china/p27369
How Deforestation in the Amazon Contributes to Climate Change
 
01:38
The Amazon is a massive carbon sink, meaning it absorbs more carbon dioxide than it emits. But the forest may only be soaking up half as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as it did twenty years ago, according to researchers. They say deforestation and tree die-offs, possibly due to higher carbon dioxide levels in the forest, may be to blame. Deforestation may also be disrupting regional precipitation patterns, and it has been linked to drought in Brazil's southeast. Rising temperatures and drought contribute to the death of trees in the forest, creating a cycle that may lead to further deforestation. This video is part of "Deforestation in the Amazon," a Council on Foreign Relations InfoGuide presentation: http://www.cfr.org/amazon
Bay of Pigs Invasion: Lessons Learned
 
06:06
On April 17, 1961, 1,511 Cuban exiles in the U.S.-backed Brigade 2506 landed on Cuba's shores at the Bahía de Cochinos--the Bay of Pigs. Their brief invasion ended on April 19 when the exiles surrendered to Fidel Castro's army, and the incident has gone down as one of the biggest fiascoes in the history of U.S. foreign policy. The U.S.-backed operation, which originated under President Dwight Eisenhower but was ultimately approved by President John F. Kennedy, called for a small invasion force, armed with the element of surprise, to trigger a general uprising in Cuba and overthrow the Castro regime. But the Cuban people did not revolt, and Castro was not surprised. Kennedy refused to commit significant U.S. military support, and the operation failed. James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, argues that the Bay of Pigs serves as a valuable reminder that one should be "prepared for failure and plan accordingly." "Had JFK thought through the possibilities of failure," Lindsay says, "he might have canceled the operation or fundamentally reshaped it." Planning for failure and "taking steps to minimize it" are "especially important when talking about decisions to use force," he argues. An analysis of a military strike on Iran, for example, would be "incomplete unless it also grapples with how a military strike might fail, or create entirely new problems to handle." This video is part of Lessons Learned, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 http://www.cfr.org/us-strategy-and-politics/lessons-learned-bay-pigs-invasion/p27980
Staying Safe in a Biology Revolution
 
13:53
CFR senior fellow for global health Laurie Garrett explains the conundrum of dual-use research of concern (DURC), in which the same experiments that allow scientists to understand pandemics can also create dangerous pathogens. Combined with advances in synthetic biology and increasingly affordable technologies, there is the possibility for a true biology revolution.
China Policy and the U.S. Presidential Election
 
02:54
The president of the United States will have to deal with a rising and more assertive China on a wide range of issues, including Asia-Pacific security, trade, and cybersecurity. U.S.-China relations will likely continue to be a mix of competition and cooperation. The central question for bilateral relations is: Can the world’s two largest economies avoid increased competition and even conflict? This video is part of a CFR series highlighting the top foreign policy priorities that the next president of the United States will face. Subscribe to CFR's YouTube channel to get new episodes: https://www.youtube.com/cfr See where the 2016 presidential candidates stand on China and all other foreign policy issues: http://www.cfr.org/campaign2016/#/china Learn more about the history of U.S. China relations: http://www.cfr.org/china/us-relations-china-1949---present/p17698
Why Solar Energy Needs Innovation to Reach Its Potential
 
04:36
Solar energy, the world’s cheapest and fastest-growing power source, could one day supply most of the world’s energy needs. But in a new book, “Taming the Sun: Innovations to Harness Solar Energy and Power the Planet” (MIT Press), energy expert Varun Sivaram warns that solar’s current surge is on track to stall, dimming prospects for averting catastrophic climate change. Brightening those prospects, he argues, will require innovation—creative financing, revolutionary technologies, and flexible energy systems. Available at: https://www.amazon.com/Taming-Sun-Innovations-Harness-Energy/dp/0262037688/
UN Security Council Reform: Is it Time?
 
10:22
The permanent membership of the UN Security Council--comprising China, France, Russian Federation, the UK, and the United States--has remained unchanged since 1945, triggering debate over whether it should be reformed to better reflect the world today. Stewart M. Patrick, senior fellow and director of the International Institutions and Global Governance Program at the Council on Foreign Relations, outlines the debate and offers analysis of the promises and obstacles on the path to UNSC reform and expansion. Patrick says U.S. officials are "really ambivalent" on the question of Security Council enlargement despite President Obama's endorsement for India's and Japan's bids for permanent seats. This is in part because the United States is concerned whether the new members will adopt policies broadly consistent with U.S. worldview, he adds. This video is part of The Internationalist, a series dedicated to in-depth discussions about leveraging multilateral cooperation to meet today's transnational challenges. For more visit The Internationalist blog: http://blogs.cfr.org/patrick/ http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/un-security-council-reform-time/p27037
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty: Three Things to Know
 
03:10
The Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons, commonly known as the Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), has helped curb the spread of nuclear weapons since 1970. Over the next month, diplomats from around the globe will gather at the United Nations to review progress on the accord. Its future depends on the commitment of member states to reduce existing stockpiles and address new proliferation challenges. Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow Adam Mount offers three things to know about the NPT. Nuclear Cornerstone: “The treaty is the cornerstone of the nuclear order,” says Mount. Signatories to the 1970 treaty that do not have nuclear weapons have agreed not to build them, while the five designated nuclear-weapons states—China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States—have agreed to reduce their arsenals. “A lot has changed since 1970, but the basic bargain remains in the interest of all states,” he adds. Treaty at Risk: The NPT may suffer if governments do not make steady progress on core nonproliferation objectives, explains Mount. He warns that Russia and the United States have significantly slowed the rate of nuclear-arms reductions in recent years. “Some wonder whether the NPT is obsolete,” Mount says. Difficult Next Steps: Mount says the 2016 presidential election may jeopardize U.S. leadership on nonproliferation, and he encourages President Barack Obama to focus on nuclear issues, including diplomacy with Iran and Russia, for the remainder of his term. “These steps are not politically easy, but must be taken to make sure the NPT continues to reduce the threat of nuclear weapons worldwide,” he says. http://www.cfr.org/nonproliferation-arms-control-and-disarmament/nuclear-nonproliferation-treaty-three-things-know/p36509
The Munich Agreement | History Lessons
 
05:51
This video is part of History Lessons, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 The Munich Agreement is one of the most criticized diplomatic agreements in history. In 1938, Adolf Hitler turned his sights on absorbing the Sudetenland, the part of Czechoslovakia dominated by ethnic Germans, into Germany. With tensions rising, British prime minister Neville Chamberlain rushed to Germany in September for talks to keep the continent at peace. Without consulting with Czechoslovakian leaders, he agreed to Hitler's demand, a decision that was ultimately formalized when Germany, Britain, France, and Italy signed the Munich Agreement on September 30. Chamberlain returned from Munich proclaiming that he had achieved "peace for our time." He was wrong. Less than a year later, German troops invaded Poland. The Second World War had begun. James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, highlights the lesson learned from the Munich Agreement: Appeasing an adversary's demands may defuse a crisis, but it can also increase the chances of war by emboldening that adversary to demand more. Chamberlain thought that if Germany gained the Sudetenland that Hitler would finally be satisfied with the status quo in Europe. But Hitler instead viewed Munich as confirming his belief that Britain and France both lacked the will to stop German expansion. Lindsay invites his audience to consider on what issue or conflict the United States might repeat Chamberlain's mistake. For more analysis from James M. Lindsay, visit The Water's Edge blog: http://blogs.cfr.org/lindsay/
Negotiations | Model Diplomacy
 
04:58
Council on Foreign Relations President Richard Haass discusses negotiations for “Israeli-Palestinian Impasse” and other CFR Model Diplomacy (https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org) case studies. He explains that almost every aspect of international relations can be subject to negotiations, from territory to trade to conflict. Negotiations, he says, always take place in a context, and the ways to structure them are endless. He also distinguishes between negotiations and consultations; the latter can be useful on their own or as a prelude to negotiations. Haass says that the fate of negotiations turns most often on ripeness, a measure of whether leaders are willing and able to make a deal. He discusses the factors involved in ripeness, explaining that it requires leaders with sufficient political strength to sell an agreement to their constituencies. Using the example of Cyprus, Haass suggests that political factors, not a lack of ideas, often account for the failure of negotiations. He also explains the potential downsides of trying to negotiate and falling short. Haass concludes, though, that countries can manage disputes even when they are unripe for resolution. Instructors interested in exploring “Israeli-Palestinian Impasse” and other cases for their classrooms can visit the Model Diplomacy case library. https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org/#/cases For more educational resources from the Council on Foreign Relations, visit CFR Campus a thttp://www.cfr.org/campus/.
A Conversation With Mahathir Mohamad
 
48:45
Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad discusses his return to political power, Malaysia’s continued development, and its foreign policy within Southeast Asia and with the United States. Speaker Mahathir Mohamad Prime Minister, Malaysia Presider John Bussey Associate Editor, The Wall Street Journal Subscribe to our channel: https://goo.gl/WCYsH7 The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an independent, nonpartisan membership organization, think tank, and publisher. Visit the CFR website: http://www.cfr.org Follow CFR on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/cfr_org Follow CFR on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/councilonforeignrelations/
Lessons Learned: Japanese-American Internment During WWII
 
03:59
On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which began the process of interning Japanese-Americans due to the alleged threat they posed while the United States was at war with Japan. During the next four years, more than 100,000 Japanese-Americans, most of them U.S. citizens, would be removed from their homes, primarily along the Pacific coast, and relocated to inland camps. James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, says the decision to intern many Japanese-Americans during the war demonstrates the difficulty of striking a balance between civil liberties and national security. In the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, he argues, the United States was again faced with difficult decisions over limits to civil liberties. Americans learned from the mistakes of World War II, he says, and the experiences of Japanese-American internees should serve as a reminder of the danger of allowing national security to trump civil liberty. This video is part of Lessons Learned, a series exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 For more information on Japanese-American Internment During WWII and other topics visit James M. Lindsay's blog, The Water's Edge: http://blogs.cfr.org/lindsay/
Lessons Learned: Tokyo Sarin Gas Attack
 
04:58
On March 20, 1995, Aum Shinrikyo, a religious cult based in Japan, used chemical weapons in a terrorist attack on Tokyo's subway system. During the morning rush hour, five cult members carried bags of liquid sarin into Tokyo's subway and pierced the bags with the tips of their umbrellas, allowing the deadly nerve agent to evaporate and spread. The attack killed twelve people and injured thousands more. James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, argues that the 1995 sarin gas attack serves as a reminder that technology now "makes it possible for groups and individuals to carry out the kinds of attacks that once only government could undertake." Concerns over the spread of such technology, he says, lie at the heart of the current debate surrounding the manipulation of the H5N1 bird flu virus in laboratories. Such debates will continue to "grow more heated," he predicts, "as technological advances make it possible to do more and more with less and less training." This video is part of Lessons Learned, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 To learn more about Aum Shinrikyo, read this backgrounder: http://www.cfr.org/japan/aum-shinrikyo/p9238 For more analysis from CFR's James M. Lindsay, visit The Water's Edge blog: http://blogs.cfr.org/lindsay/ http://www.cfr.org/japan/lessons-learned-tokyo-sarin-gas-attack/p27685
A Conversation With Adel al-Jubeir
 
56:39
SPEAKER Adel al-Jubeir, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia PRESIDER Isobel Coleman, Chief Operating Officer, GiveDirectly; Former U.S. Representative to the United Nations for Management, Reform, and Special Political Affairs, U.S. Department of State Subscribe to our channel: https://goo.gl/WCYsH7 The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an independent, nonpartisan membership organization, think tank, and publisher. Visit the CFR website: http://www.cfr.org Follow CFR on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/cfr_org Follow CFR on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/councilonforeignrelations/
The Tools of Diplomacy
 
02:12
Council on Foreign Relations President Richard Haass discusses the contents of a diplomat’s foreign policy toolbox for CFR’s Model Diplomacy, a free multimedia program that engages students through role-play to understand the challenges of shaping U.S. foreign policy in an interconnected world. Diplomats advance a country’s interests by influencing other actors to move those interests forward. The tools of a diplomat include negotiations, sanctions, and more, and can be used for a range of purposes. There is rarely unanimous agreement on which tools to use, which inevitably leads to bargaining about foreign policy goals and strategy. Tools aren’t solutions but instruments to shape outcomes, Haass says, noting that they are not on-off switches, and that it is impossible to predict how their use will play out over time. Instructors interested in using Model Diplomacy in their classrooms can learn more at https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org/. For more educational resources from the Council on Foreign Relations, visit CFR Campus at http://www.cfr.org/campus/. Speaker: Richard N. Haass, President, Council on Foreign Relations
China's Maritime Disputes in the South China Sea and East China Sea
 
07:26
-- This video is part of the Council on Foreign Relations "China's Maritime Disputes" InfoGuide Presentation: http://cfr.org/chinasea -- Video: Preventative Measures: http://on.cfr.org/17xUJXJ Video: Crisis Management: http://on.cfr.org/HteSC8 The East and South China Seas are the scene of escalating territorial disputes between China and its neighbors, including Japan, Vietnam, and the Philippines. The tensions, shaped by China's growing assertiveness, have fueled concerns over armed conflict and raised questions about Washington's security commitments in its strategic rebalance toward the Asia-Pacific region. "Maritime disputes in the East and South China Seas are a pressing issue for the United States, China, and much of the rest of the world," says Elizabeth Economy, CFR's Director for Asia Studies. The region is rich in natural resources, home to many of the world's most dynamic economies, and an important global trade route for energy supplies and other goods. It is also a region in which power politics are at play and defense budgets are rising rapidly. As China's economic ascent facilitates growing military capabilities and assertiveness in both the East and South China Seas, other regional players are also experiencing their own rise in nationalism and military capability, and have exhibited greater willingness to stake territorial claims. Meanwhile, the U.S. "pivot" to Asia, involving renewed diplomatic activity and military redeployment, could signal Washington's heightened role in the disputes. If not managed wisely, these disputes could turn part of Asia's maritime regions from thriving trade channels into arenas of conflict. "If there is a use of force between Japan and China, this could be a full-on, all -out conflict between these two Asian giants, and as a treaty ally of Japan, will automatically trigger or automatically involve the United States," cautions Sheila A. Smith, CFR's Senior Fellow for Japan Studies. These dynamics pose an "exquisite" dilemma for U.S. foreign policy, says CFR President Richard N. Haass. "The danger is that twenty-first-century Asia could begin to go the way of twentieth-century Europe."
A Conversation with Ray Dalio
 
01:07:04
Ray Dalio, founder and co-chief investment officer of Bridgewater Associates, L.P., discusses global economics. This meeting is part of the Corporate Program's CEO Speaker Series, which provides a forum for leading global CEOs to share their priorities and insights before a high-level audience of CFR members. The series aims to educate the CFR membership on the private sector's important role in the policy debate. SPEAKER: Ray Dalio PRESIDER: Maria Bartiromo http://www.cfr.org/business-and-foreign-policy/conversation-ray-dalio-video/p28984
The Sunni-Shia Divide
 
08:48
This video is part of the Council on Foreign Relations' InfoGuide Presentation, "The Sunni-Shia Divide": http://www.cfr.org/sunnishia An ancient religious divide is helping fuel a resurgence of conflicts in the Middle East and Muslim countries. Struggles between Sunni and Shia forces have fed a Syrian civil war that threatens to transform the map of the Middle East, spurred violence that is fracturing Iraq, and widened fissures in a number of tense Gulf countries. Growing sectarian clashes have also sparked a revival of transnational jihadi networks that poses a threat beyond the region. Islam's schism, simmering for fourteen centuries, doesn't explain all the political, economic, and geostrategic factors involved in these conflicts, but it has become one prism by which to understand the underlying tensions. Two countries that compete for the leadership of Islam, Sunni Saudi Arabia and Shia Iran, have used the sectarian divide to further their ambitions. How their rivalry is settled will likely shape the political balance between Sunnis and Shias and the future of the region, especially in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, and Bahrain. Alongside the proxy battle is the renewed fervor of armed militants, motivated by the goals of cleansing the faith or preparing the way for the return of the messiah. Today there are tens of thousands of organized sectarian militants throughout the region capable of triggering a broader conflict. And despite the efforts of many Sunni and Shia clerics to reduce tensions through dialogue and counterviolence measures, many experts express concern that Islam's divide will lead to escalating violence and a growing threat to international peace and security. Sunni and Shia Muslims have lived peacefully together for centuries. In many countries it has become common for members of the two sects to intermarry and pray at the same mosques. They share faith in the Quran and the Prophet Mohammed's sayings and perform similar prayers, although they differ in rituals and interpretation of Islamic law.
Personality and Power: The Case of Otto Von Bismarck
 
59:40
ORIGINALLY RECORDED October 20, 2011 Jonathan Steinberg, professor of modern European History at the Univeristy of Pennsylvania, discusses his book, Bismark: A Life. This meeting is part of a series hosted with the National History Center featuring prominent historians who will examine the events and times that shaped foreign policy as we know it today. SPEAKER: Jonathan Steinberg, Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Modern European History, University of Pennsylvania; Author, Bismarck: A Life PRESIDER: Wm. Roger Louis, Kerr Professor of English History and Culture and Distinguished Teaching Professor, University of Texas at Austin; Director, National History Center, American Historical Association http://www.cfr.org/germany/personality-power-case-otto-von-bismarck-video/p26488
Three Things to Know: The BRICS
 
03:22
The leaders of Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa (BRICS) are gathering in the Russian city of Ufa for their seventh annual summit. The bloc is expected to usher in a pair of institutions, a development bank and a currency reserve fund, that they hope will diminish Western control of the global financial system. Stewart M. Patrick, director of CFR's International Institutions and Global Governance Program, offers three things to know about the BRICS. 0:45 Diverse but Cooperative: The BRICS countries vary tremendously in terms of their political systems and economic strength. Brazil, India, and South Africa are liberal democracies, while China and Russia are authoritarian, explains Patrick. And China’s GDP is larger than that of the four other countries combined. However, "for all their differences, the BRICS find common ground in the principles of sovereignty and nonintervention," he says. 1:36 Financial Alternatives: Developing countries remain underrepresented at the Bretton Woods institutions (the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, or IMF), and so the BRICS are launching their own financial organizations, says Patrick. The BRICS will seek to use their New Development Bank, funded at $50 billion, and a Contingency Reserve Arrangement, funded at $100 billion, to finance projects throughout the developing world. "New BRICS organizations offer an attractive alternative to U.S.-led institutions," says Patrick. 2:25 Inclusive Multilateralism; The BRICS are central members of multilateral arrangements, like the G20 and the Nuclear Security Summit process, that offer emerging economies a seat at the table. Like the BRICS, other rising powers such as Indonesia, Mexico, South Korea, and Turkey are eager to play a more prominent role in global governance, says Patrick. http://www.cfr.org/international-organizations-and-alliances/brics-three-things-know/p36759
Sovereignty | Model Diplomacy
 
04:21
Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, describes sovereignty for “Russia and NATO in the Baltics” and other CFR Model Diplomacy (https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org) case studies. He discusses sovereignty’s role as a fundamental idea of international relations. When the idea emerged around four hundred years ago, he says, it reduced conflict in the world, though it has not been a panacea. Haass reviews challenges to sovereignty and discusses the “responsibility to protect,” which conditions sovereignty on a state’s respect for certain obligations. Instructors interested in exploring “Russia and NATO in the Baltics” and other cases for their classrooms can visit the Model Diplomacy case library. https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org/#/cases For more educational resources from the Council on Foreign Relations, visit CFR Campus at www.cfr.org/education.
Lessons Learned: The Firebombing of Tokyo
 
03:54
On March 9, 1945, B-29 bombers in the U.S. Air Force began dropping incendiary bombs on the city of Tokyo. This raid, known as "Operation Meetinghouse," caused incredible destruction, killing perhaps 100,000 people and burning out fifteen square miles of the city. Incendiary bombings continued in the months to come, targeting other Japanese cities and killing hundreds of thousands of Japanese civilians. James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, says the firebombing of Tokyo should remind us of the destructive power of conventional weapons. During the war, he points out, conventional bombings accounted for far more civilian deaths in Japan than did the nuclear weapons dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. He argues that more recent conflicts, from the Rwandan genocide to fighting in Iraq, continue to illustrate the destructive power of conventional arsenals. This video is part of Lessons Learned, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270&feature=plcp For more analysis from CFR's James M. Lindsay visit The Water's Edge blog: http://blogs.cfr.org/lindsay/
Can Americans Think (Strategically)?
 
01:02:20
ORIGINALLY RECORDED October 22, 2010 Dean Kishore Mahbubani discusses the relations of the United States with the ASEAN countries, China, and India as well as strategic geopolitical contradictions and opportunities for the United States in Asia. SPEAKER: Kishore Mahbubani, Dean and Professor in the Practice of Public Policy, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore PRESIDER: The Honorable Winston Lord, Chairman Emeritus, International Rescue Committee; Former President, Council on Foreign Relations http://www.cfr.org/asia/can-americans-think-strategically-video/p23213
The Eastern Congo
 
10:20
This video is part of the Council on Foreign Relations' InfoGuide Presentation, "The Eastern Congo": http://www.cfr.org/congo The eastern Congo, the site of the deadliest conflict since World War II, has been ravaged by both foreign invasions and homegrown rebellions. Home to vast mineral and natural resource wealth, the country continues to defy efforts at pacification. As the conflict has morphed from a regional war to a series of tenacious local insurgencies, the civilians caught in the middle have paid the steepest price. And with critical elections approaching, the hard-won gains of an internationally-backed peace process are at risk.
The Oslo Accords | History Lessons
 
06:37
This video is part of History Lessons, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 On September 13, 1993, Israeli and Palestinian leaders met at the White House to sign the Oslo Accords. The Oslo Accords originated in discussions that a Norwegian mediator brokered in January 1993. Few people expected the largely secret talks to succeed, but thanks in part to the diligence of Norway's foreign minister, a deal was struck in August. The most memorable image from the day of the accords' signing came when Yasir Arafat and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin shook hands under the watchful eye of President Bill Clinton. Unfortunately, the goal of the Oslo Accords remains unfulfilled today. James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, argues that international agreements can still be useful even when they do not deliver all that is expected of them. Oslo did not solve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but its accomplishments remain significant. The Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) formally acknowledged for the first time Israel's right to a safe and peaceful existence. The Palestinian National Authority was born, and Palestinians gained a measure of self-rule over the Gaza Strip and parts of the West Bank. Perhaps most important, the practice of direct talks between the two sides was established. Lindsay invites his audience to consider the future for a negotiated peace between the Israelis and the Palestinians and discuss what role the United States should play in bringing it about. For more analysis from James M. Lindsay, visit The Water's Edge blog: http://blogs.cfr.org/lindsay/ http://www.cfr.org/middle-east/oslo-accords-history-lessons/p28987
Lessons Learned: The Ludlow Amendment
 
06:01
Seventy-four years ago this week, members of the House of Representatives voted on the Ludlow Amendment, which would have changed the constitution to require a national referendum before allowing Congress to declare war. The amendment went down in defeat, but it captures a particular moment in U.S. history when the memory of World War I, the Great Depression, and gathering storm clouds in Europe combined to spur isolationist sentiment in the United States. James M. Lindsay, senior vice president and director of studies, argues that the Ludlow Amendment serves as a powerful reminder that the authority to deploy force was not always so concentrated in the executive branch. The recent debate about Operation Odyssey Dawn in Libya, he says, shows that this power could again become a Congressional prerogative, or even a public one. http://www.cfr.org/us-strategy-and-politics/lessons-learned-ludlow-amendment/p27059
Multilateralism | Model Diplomacy
 
02:45
Council on Foreign Relations Senior Fellow Stewart Patrick discusses the concept of multilateralism for “Global Climate Change Policy” and other CFR Model Diplomacy case studies. Model Diplomacy (https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org) is a free multimedia simulation program that engages students through role-play to understand the challenges of shaping U.S. foreign policy in an interconnected world. Defined as “cooperation between three or more countries,” Patrick says that multilateralism occurs when countries come together to solve common problems. There are a growing number of problems that require multilateralism, including climate change, epidemics, and cyber insecurity. In addition to universal membership in widely known organizations like the UN, Patrick says that the United States and other countries turn increasingly to a broader set of arrangements, such as the G20, to address multilateral issues. Patrick says that a pressing challenge for multilateralism today is how to effectively include new actors at the table on global stage. This is particularly true, given that emerging and established nations often do not share the same priorities or values as more established countries. This can make multilateral cooperation difficult, since such cooperation inherently requires nations to compromise. Instructors interested in exploring “Global Climate Change Policy” and other cases for their classrooms can visit the Model Diplomacy case library. https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org/#/cases For more educational resources from the Council on Foreign Relations, visit CFR Campus at www.cfr.org/education.
Iran Deal Breach: A Model Diplomacy Case Study
 
04:39
Ray Takeyh, Hasib J. Sabbagh senior fellow for Middle East Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, provides an overview of “Iran Deal Breach” —a scenario from CFR’s Model Diplomacy (https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org), a free multimedia simulation program that engages students through role-play to understand the challenges of shaping U.S. foreign policy in an interconnected world. Takeyh discusses Iran’s location, demographics, and political and religious dynamics, as well as concerns that it has sought to harness nuclear energy to make weapons. Takeyh outlines U.S.-Iran relations and responses to Iran’s nuclear development, culminating in the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). He explains current U.S. interests in Iran and U.S. policy options in case of a prospective violation of the JCPOA. Instructors interested in exploring the “Iran Deal Breach” for their classrooms can visit the Model Diplomacy case profile. https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org/#/cases/4479 For more educational resources from the Council on Foreign Relations, visit CFR Campus at www.cfr.org/education.
Beyond the BRICS
 
06:33
A second tier of middle-income powers is emerging beyond the Brazil, India, China, Russia, and South Africa (BRICS) group. These countries complicate traditional conceptions of East vs. West and developed vs. developing nations. CFR Senior Fellow Stewart M. Patrick analyses the global impact of this shift: * The BRICS have formed a formal group; however, questions remain over whether they will turn their economic clout into political power. Though they align on some issues like the role of the dollar, they collide on others such as the value of democracy. * Eleven countries outside the BRICS have been identified as the next crop of global powers: Bangladesh, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Nigeria, South Korea, Pakistan, Mexico, the Philippines, Turkey, and Vietnam. * These nations are all clamoring to reform global institutions and upset traditional divisions of international relations. But are they prepared to assume global responsibilities? This video is part of The Internationalist, a series dedicated to in-depth discussions about leveraging multilateral cooperation to meet today's transnational challenges: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL01B72D2A5341FEBD For more analysis by Stewart M. Patrick or to weigh in with your views, go to The Internationalist blog: http://blogs.cfr.org/patrick/ http://www.cfr.org/global-governance/beyond-brics/p27648
Intelligence | Model Diplomacy
 
04:39
Jami Miscik, former deputy director for intelligence of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), discusses intelligence and its use in policymaking for “Interrogation Policy” and other CFR Model Diplomacy (https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org) case studies. Intelligence, she explains, is designed to give policymakers an edge by providing information unavailable elsewhere. She explains such concepts as human intelligence, signals intelligence, geospatial intelligence, intelligence operations, and the intelligence cycle. Additionally, using the example of the September 11 attacks, Miscik draws a distinction between tactical and strategic intelligence. Miscik explains that the modern U.S. intelligence community has its roots in the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. In 1947, President Harry S. Truman signed the National Security Act, creating the CIA, among other institutions. The intelligence community structure laid out by the act remained broadly in place until the 2004 establishment of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. The intelligence community is constantly evolving, says Miscik, with digitalization and cybersecurity among the challenges faced by intelligence professionals today. As Miscik notes, the intelligence community’s successes are often kept secret, but its failures become public and are examined for lessons that can promote U.S. security. Instructors interested in exploring “Interrogation Policy” and other cases for their classrooms can visit the Model Diplomacy case library. https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org/#/cases For more educational resources from the Council on Foreign Relations, visit CFR Campus at www.cfr.org/education.
U.S.-Cuba Relations: Three Things to Know
 
03:25
The Obama administration's decision to resurrect diplomatic ties with Cuba after more than fifty years is a step in the right direction, but Washington and Havana have different political objectives that may hinder the normalization process. Meanwhile, the U.S. Congress is unlikely to lift the trade embargo anytime soon. CFR Adjunct Senior Fellow Carla Anne Robbins offers three things to know about the way forward for U.S.-Cuba ties. Conflicting Goals: President Obama hopes to use the detente to bring Cuba into the twenty-first century and move it toward democracy. Whereas the Cubans objective is to gain the maximum financial gain while maintaining "as much of the Old Castro system as they can," says Robbins. Tactical Focus: Immediate goals for U.S. and Cuban diplomats will be limited to resolving smaller issues. Washington wants to increase its diplomatic presence in Cuba. Havana wants Cuba removed from the State Department's list of State Sponsors of Terrorism, and demands the United States stop offering internet access and classes to dissidents. No Trade Boom: "There will be no trade bonanza for Americans," Robbins warns. Lifting the embargo requires congressional action, and this will not happen in the near term, she says. However, the cooling off period will make it easier for Americans to travel Cuba and spend their tourist dollars. http://www.cfr.org/cuba/us-cuba-relations/p36063
A Conversation with John C. Bogle
 
58:47
John Bogle, founder of the Vanguard Group, discusses lessons learned from the 2008 financial crisis and the future of investment management in a period of global low-returns. SPEAKER John C. Bogle, Founder, Vanguard Group; President, Bogle Financial Markets Research Center PRESIDER Rana Foroohar, Global Business Columnist and Associate Editor, Financial Times
Lessons Learned: LBJ Announces He Will Not Seek Reelection
 
05:36
In a televised speech on March 31, 1968, U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson announced that he would not seek reelection. Johnson's decision was in large part a consequence of declining public support for his policies in the Vietnam War. The Tet Offensive, a massive assault in late January 1968 by North Vietnamese forces on South Vietnam, contradicted the Johnson administration's assertions of progress in Vietnam and further undermined Johnson's credibility. As challenges from other members of his party--including Senators Eugene McCarthy and Robert Kennedy--began to mount in the Democratic primary, Johnson chose not to run again. James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, argues that Johnson's decision serves as a reminder that "foreign policy may not make a presidency, but it certainly can break one." Many other presidents have faced stiff criticism for their foreign policies, Lindsay says, including Harry Truman, Jimmy Carter, and George W. Bush. Their experiences, he argues, raise the question of why presidents are "so eager to pursue an activist foreign policy when history suggests that it so often hurts them politically." This video is part of Lessons Learned, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 For more analysis from James M. Lindsay visit The Water's Edge blog: http://blogs.cfr.org/lindsay/ http://www.cfr.org/us-strategy-and-politics/lbj-announces-he-not-seek-reelection/p27745
Who is a Child?
 
04:02
This video is part of the Council on Foreign Relations' "Child Marriage" InfoGuide Presentation: http://www.cfr.org/childmarriage Most countries prohibit child marriage and set eighteen as the age of adulthood, based on the argument that younger children are not mature enough to make choices about marriage. But in many communities worldwide, social and cultural norms dictate that adulthood begins much earlier. In this video, part of CFR's Child Marriage InfoGuide, experts explore the "gray area" in defining who a child is.
Trade and the U.S. Presidential Election
 
03:51
The next president's trade policy will affect millions of Americans, as well as the health and competitiveness of the country’s economy. It can also advance strategic interests like strengthening the economies of allies, deepening diplomatic ties, and promoting global cooperation that acts as a bulwark against conflict. The next president, along with Congress, will need to develop trade policy that promotes growth, while helping Americans adjust to new competition and ensuring regulatory standards. This video is part of a CFR series highlighting the top foreign policy priorities that the next president of the United States will face. Subscribe to CFR's YouTube channel to get new episodes: https://www.youtube.com/cfr See where the 2016 presidential candidates stand on Trade and all other foreign policy issues: http://www.cfr.org/campaign2016/trade Learn more about the future of U.S. trade policy: http://www.cfr.org/trade/future-us-trade-policy/p36422
Violence Against Women in India: Three Things to Know
 
02:48
A brutal New Delhi gang rape has triggered outrage across India. CFR's Isobel Coleman highlights three things to know about the case, and discusses the larger issue of violence against women in the country: • Gender Inequality at the Root: "In India, girls are valued less than boys," she says, "and this results in many inequalities in society." In addition to rampant sex-selective abortions, Coleman points to significant disparities in access to health care and education. • A Culture of Complicity: "Culturally, there's not enough exposure and conviction against those who are perpetrating acts of violence against women," Coleman says. Citing examples of cases where police officers have pressured victims to keep silent or even marry their rapists to avoid prosecution, she says there is "a culture of complicity around violence against women." • Opportunity for Change: The recent demonstrations are unprecedented in India, and could mark a turning point, Coleman says. "It could in fact result in some substantive changes for women. In particular for violence against women, but more broadly throughout society," she says. Read more on Isobel Coleman's "Democracy in Development" blog: http://blogs.cfr.org/coleman/ http://www.cfr.org/india/violence-against-women-india-three-things-know/p29784
An Introduction to the National Security Council
 
02:23
Two former National Security Advisors and a former member of the NSC Staff – Stephen Hadley, Colin Powell, and Meghan O’Sullivan– discuss the purpose, make-up, function, and history of the National Security Council (NSC) for CFR’s Model Diplomacy, a free multimedia program that engages students through role-play to understand the challenges of shaping U.S. foreign policy in an interconnected world. The NSC is an advisory rather than a decision-making body, says Stephen Hadley, responsible for issues that require the attention and coordination of multiple federal agencies. Each American president possesses a measure of flexibility in designing the structure of the NSC so that it can adapt to his unique management style. The NSC, says Colin Powell, is intended to draw attention to and advise the president on the nation’s most challenging national security challenges. Ultimately, decisions are made by the president. Meghan O’Sullivan suggests that the increasingly complex nature of national security issues makes the NSC’s work today more challenging than in the past. As a result, she says, the current NSC is relatively larger and more hierarchical. Instructors interested in using Model Diplomacy in their classrooms can learn more at https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org/. For more educational resources from the Council on Foreign Relations, visit CFR Campus at http://www.cfr.org/campus/. Speakers: Stephen Hadley, U.S. National Security Advisor 2005-2009 Meghan O'Sullivan, U.S. Deputy National Security Advisor for Iraq and Afghanistan 2004-2007 Colin Powell, U.S. National Security Advisor 1987-1989
The UN Human Rights Council: Five Things to Know
 
05:46
The UN Human Rights Council has taken an increasingly prominent role in pressing for global action on the Syrian crisis. This marks a continuing revival of the world's preeminent rights body, which replaced a discredited rights commission. CFR Senior Fellow Stewart M. Patrick looks at five chief things to know about the reconstituted forum: - In 2006, the United Nations decided to dissolve the UN Commission on Human Rights, "which had become a haven for human rights abusers and an embarrassment." The Obama administration chose to join the forty-seven-member council, "rather than allowing human rights violators and spoilers from Cuba to Pakistan to run roughshod over it." - Despite important improvements, the Council maintains some serious flaws, ranging from procedural roadblocks like membership criteria to political tensions between civil and political rights and economic rights. - Regardless of these flaws, the Council's new "universal periodic review" has been a powerful instrument for advancing human rights across the world, from Iran to Zimbabwe. - A little-known fact is the important addition of term limits to Council membership. This will force countries like Saudi Arabia, China, and Russia to "take a time-out from the Council" when their terms expire this year. Now the worst abusers cannot "fester on the Council." - Council membership has had some crucial payoffs for the United States, including exerting pressure on Iran and Syria, and taking the lead with the United States against the former Libyan regime of Muammar al-Qaddafi. This video is part of The Internationalist, a series dedicated to in-depth discussions about leveraging multilateral cooperation to meet today's transnational challenges. For more visit The Internationalist blog: http://blogs.cfr.org/patrick/ http://www.cfr.org/un/un-human-rights-council-five-things-know/p27512
Humanitarian Intervention | Model Diplomacy
 
03:55
Council on Foreign Relations Senior Fellow for Defense Policy Janine Davidson discusses the concept of military humanitarian intervention for CFR Model Diplomacy’s “Humanitarian Intervention in South Sudan” case study. Model Diplomacy (https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org) is a free multimedia simulation program that engages students through role-play to understand the challenges of shaping U.S. foreign policy in an interconnected world. Davidson says a humanitarian intervention is an intervention to help civilians that includes a military presence. In this context, she explains the “responsibility to protect,” a norm that calls for international intervention to protect civilians when their government is not doing so. But she notes the tension between this norm and respect for sovereignty. Using such examples as Somalia, Rwanda, and the Balkans, Davidson outlines the variety of missions encompassed under humanitarian intervention, from disaster relief to more complex interventions in conflict zones. She then reviews policy considerations surrounding humanitarian intervention, including the root causes of the situation, international authority for the mission, military logistics, exit strategies, and the costs and benefits of unilateral versus multilateral action. Humanitarian and disaster assistance have become frequent tasks for the U.S. military, Davidson notes, sparking debate within the Pentagon over whether and how to prioritize this type of mission. Instructors interested in exploring “Humanitarian Intervention in South Sudan” for their classrooms can visit the Model Diplomacy case profile. https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org/#/cases/48 For more educational resources from the Council on Foreign Relations, visit CFR Campus at www.cfr.org/education.
Running a National Security Council Meeting
 
02:32
Three former National Security Council Advisors– Stephen Hadley, Colin Powell, and Brent Scowcroft – discuss the reasons National Security Council (NSC) meetings are called, and how they tend to operate, for CFR’s Model Diplomacy, a free multimedia program that engages students through role-play to understand the challenges of shaping U.S. foreign policy in an interconnected world. Instructors interested in using Model Diplomacy in their classrooms can learn more at https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org/. For more educational resources from the Council on Foreign Relations, visit CFR Campus at http://www.cfr.org/campus/. Speakers: Stephen Hadley, U.S. National Security Advisor 2005-2009 Colin Powell, U.S. National Security Advisor 1987-1989 Brent Scowcroft, U.S. National Security Advisor 1975-1977 and 1989-1993
Eisenhower Reconsidered
 
57:07
Jean Edward Smith, senior scholar at Columbia University's history department, discusses his new book, Eisenhower in War and Peace. SPEAKER: Jean Edward Smith PRESIDER: Alan Brinkley http://www.cfr.org/foreign-policy-history/eisenhower-reconsidered/p29544
How Should the United States Address Its Chinese Trade Imbalance?
 
01:02:37
ORIGINALLY RECORDED March 9, 2011 Experts outline variables such as nominal exchange rates, foreign exchange interventions, and macroeconomic imbalances as contributing factors affecting the trade relations between China and the United States. This event was part of the McKinsey Executive Roundtable series in International Economics SPEAKERS: Eswar Prasad, Nandlal P. Tolani Senior Professor of Trade Policy, Cornell University; Former Head of the China Division, International Monetary Fund Peter Schiff, President and Chief Global Strategist, Euro Pacific Capital Shang-Jin Wei, N.T. Wang Professor of Chinese Business and Economy, Columbia University; Former Head of the Trade and Investment Division, International Monetary Fund PRESIDER: Joyce Chang, Global Head of Emerging Markets and Credit Research, J.P. Morgan http://www.cfr.org/china/should-united-states-address-its-chinese-trade-imbalance-video/p24332
Lessons Learned: North Atlantic Treaty Signing
 
05:19
On April 4, 1949, the United States and eleven European countries met in Washington, DC, and signed the North Atlantic Treaty. By helping to create the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the United States signaled that it would not retreat into "Fortress America" as it had after World War I. The decision to remain engaged was made in part because U.S. policymakers feared an expansionist Soviet Union, particularly after Moscow orchestrated the overthrow of Czechoslovakia's democratically elected government in March 1948. U.S. participation in NATO offered European nations protection from Soviet encroachment, and marked the first time in its history that the United States had made a peacetime military commitment to Europe. James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, argues that U.S. participation in NATO marked a fundamental shift in the course of U.S. foreign policy. However, he notes, undertaking such a shift can often prove difficult. "Countries at times do change the fundamental direction of their foreign policies," he says, "but usually only after much delay and in response to epic events." In NATO's case, he points out, the "United States abandoned its nineteenth century foreign policy only after two world wars." As U.S. policymakers today face a world that is "very different than the one that led to the signing of the North Atlantic Treaty," he invites us to consider whether another "fundamental rethinking of American foreign policy" may be necessary. This video is part of Lessons Learned, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 http://www.cfr.org/nato/lessons-learned-north-atlantic-treaty-signing/p27847
Israeli-Palestinian Impasse: A Model Diplomacy Case Study
 
05:32
Robert Danin, senior fellow for Middle East studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, provides an overview of “Israeli-Palestinian Impasse” —a scenario from CFR’s Model Diplomacy (https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org), a free multimedia simulation program that engages students through role-play to understand the challenges of shaping U.S. foreign policy in an interconnected world. Danin explores the dynamics of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and possible paths for U.S. policy. He explains that both the Israelis and the Palestinians see the land between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea as their own, and he notes the goal of reaching a two-state solution. He then discusses the chief Palestinian political institutions: the Palestine Liberation Organization, the political parties of Fatah and Hamas, and the Palestinian Authority (PA). Danin also surveys the Israeli political scene, where, he says, many in the government believe that no deal is to be reached with the Palestinians. They see PA president Mahmoud Abbas as too weak to make peace; the Palestinians, by contrast, see Israel as overly rigid and strong. Danin goes on to explore the issues of nationalism, geography, and religion that underlie the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Finally, he notes the central U.S. position in efforts to resolve the conflict, and he outlines three policy approaches for the United States today. Instructors interested in exploring “Israeli-Palestinian Impasse” for their classrooms can visit the Model Diplomacy case profile. https://modeldiplomacy.cfr.org/#/cases/51 For more educational resources from the Council on Foreign Relations, visit CFR Campus at www.cfr.org/education.
A Conversation With Robert J. Shiller
 
01:05:54
Robert J. Shiller discusses the importance of economic irrationality, crowd behavior, and other elements of behavioral finance in understanding the global economy and making effective economic policy. Speaker: Robert J. Shiller, Sterling Professor of Economics, Yale University; Recipient, 2013 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences Presider: Peter R. Orszag, Vice Chairman of Corporate and Investment Banking and Chairman of the Financial Strategy and Solutions Group, Citigroup, Inc.; Former Director, Office of Management and Budget, White House Opening Remarks: Robert E. Rubin, Co-Chairman, Council on Foreign Relations; Former Secretary of the U.S. Treasury This symposium, presented by the Maurice R. Greenberg Center for Geoeconomic Studies, is made possible through the generous support of Robert B. Menschel.
Egypt's Democratic Quest: From Nasser to Tahrir Square
 
06:41
Egypt's 2011 revolution marks the latest chapter in Egyptians' longtime struggle for greater democratic freedoms. In this CFR video, Steven A. Cook, CFR's Hasib J. Sabbagh senior fellow for Middle Eastern studies and author of "The Struggle for Egypt", identifies the lessons that Egypt's emerging leadership must learn from the Nasser, Sadat, and Mubarak regimes. Egypt's new leaders "need to develop a coherent and compelling, emotionally satisfying vision of Egyptian society, and answer the question what Egypt stands for and what its place in the world is," argues Cook. "If they don't answer those questions in a way that makes sense to most Egyptians," Cook cautions, "they too will be forced to rely on coercion and fear to maintain their rule. This, like Mubarak before them, will be their undoing and the struggle for Egypt will continue." http://www.cfr.org/egypt/egypts-democratic-quest-nasser-tahrir-square/p26137
A Conversation With Shaykh Abdallah bin Bayyah
 
01:16:40
Shaykh Abdallah bin Bayyah discusses religiously-motivated radicalization and the ways in which Muslim communities can mobilize to counter violent extremism. Speakers: Abdallah Bin Bayyah, President, Forum for Promoting Peace in Muslim Societies Hamza Yusuf, President, Zaytuna College Presider: William F. Vendley, Secretary-General, World Conference of Religions for Peace

Examples of cover letter for finance jobs
Inter cover letter
Unf admissions essay layout
Utep admissions essay samples
Writing letter to judge uk