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Episode 150: Social Responsibility Perspectives: The Shareholder and Stakeholder Approach
 
07:44
Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 An outline of the two perspectives related to corporate social responsibility: the shareholder model and the stakeholder model. Discussion also includes support for each perspective, including that of famous nobel prize winning economist Milton Friedman.
Episode 145: Weber's Bureaucratic Management
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Developed by German sociologist Max Weber, Bureaucratic Management was an answer to the subjectivity of traditional management systems. Weber advocated that bureaucracy was the ideal system for modern organizations. In this video we discuss the characteristics of an ideal bureaucracy.
Expectancy Theory of Motivation | Episode 28
 
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Developed by Yale business professor Victor Vroom in 1964, Expectancy Theory attempts to explain why we decide to engage in certain behaviors when presented with limitless alternatives. In this video I'll explain the three variables to make-up Expectancy Theory and provide examples to reinforce the theory. Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P
Views: 122100 Alanis Business Academy
Episode 140: Introduction to Management: A Look Into the Management Process
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Management is defined as getting work done through others. In this introductory video, we explore the common functions of management and set the stage for the remainder of this video series.
Episode 117: The Hawthorne Effect: Why Workers Respond to More Than Just Money
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P The Hawthorne Effect was the product of a series of studies conducted at the Hawthorne Works plant of Western Electric beginning in the late 1920s. Used to produce switches and relays, the Hawthorne Works plant was located in Cicero, IL which is just outside of Chicago. Western Electric would later develop into Ma Bell, which was broken up in the 1980s due competition concerns and created we what now know as AT&T. Leading the Hawthorne studies was an Australian psychologist named Elton Mayo who, along with his colleagues at the Harvard Business School, was attempting to determine whether or not changes in the physical environment would affect worker productivity. Over the course of the study, Mayo and his colleagues altered the frequency and duration of rest periods, the length of a workday, employee compensation, temperature settings, and even lighting to see how such changes would impact worker productivity. The researchers hypothesized among other things that increasing the frequency of meal periods would increase productivity, while decreasing lighting levels would decrease productivity. To the amazement of the researchers, these changes and many others resulted in increased worker productivity. So why did this happen? While researchers were using temperature, lighting, and duration of rest periods i.e. the independent variables to explain the impact on productivity i.e the dependent variable, they failed to consider another important independent variable at work: attention. It seemed that the employees being studied were not in fact responding the change physical conditions but were rather responding to the increased attention they were receiving during the study. This increased attention appeared to have caused employees to feel as if they were special for being singled out during the observation period. Although several flaws in the Hawthorne Studies exist, like the absence of blind study to measure the impact of knowingly being observed and the extraordinarily small sample size, the Hawthorne Studies are considered to be one of the most important studies in human relations. For the first time ever, there was research that shed light on other factors beyond pay that could lead to increased worker productivity. Also, the study altered the common perception of employees as merely appendages of machines. So what is the Hawthorne Effect? The Hawthorne Effect is the phenomenon in which subjects alter their behavior in response to being observed. Think about your own behavior when your supervisor is nearby, or a police officer if traveling behind you down the street. Do you increase or elevate your performance or maybe alter your behavior? Chances are you answered yes and this is the Hawthorne Effect at work. Although this is not earth shattering in the 21st century, this research was groundbreaking during the 1930s. More importantly, the Hawthorne Studies led to greater interest in the study of human relations, spawning work by well known motivational theorists such as Maslow, McClelland, McGregor, and Herzberg. This has been the Hawthorne Effect. If you have any questions please leave them in the comment box below and I'll do my best to answer them in a timely fashion. Be sure to subscribe to Alanis Business Academy for access to our latest videos, and also remember to like and share this video with your friends. Thanks for watching. To subscribe to Alanis Business Academy for access to additional business content select the following link: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=mattalanis To access the Alanis Business Academy Youtube channel select the following link: http://www.youtube.com/user/mattalanis
Episode 143: Frederick Winslow Taylor's Scientific Management
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P The Principles of Scientific Management (PDF): http://tinyurl.com/pd2zl9c Developed by mechanical engineer Frederick Winslow Taylor, Scientific Management was an early management movement designed to improve efficiency within the workplace. Scientific management's focus was on determining what constituted an honest day's work as well as identifying the most efficient methods of performing job related tasks. Taylor also advocated for offering workers pay incentives if they were able to increase output during the work day, thus attempting to reduce the common practice of soldiering.
Views: 126582 Alanis Business Academy
Episode 123: Introduction to Debt and Equity Financing
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Finance is the function responsible for identifying the firm's best sources of funding as well as how best to use those funds. These funds allow firms to meet payroll obligations, repay long-term loans, pay taxes, and purchase equipment among other things. Although many different methods of financing exist, we classify them under two categories: debt financing and equity financing. To address why firms have two main sources of funding we have take a look at the accounting equation. The basic accounting equation states that assets equal liabilities plus owners' equity. This equation remains constant because firms look to debt, also known as liabilities, or investor money, also known as owners' equity, to run operations. Debt financing is long-term borrowing provided by non-owners, meaning individuals or other firms that do not have an ownership stake in the company. Debt financing commonly takes the form of taking out loans and selling corporate bonds. Using debt financing provides several benefits to firms. First, interest payments are tax deductible. Just like the interest on a mortgage loan is tax deductible for homeowners, firms can reduce their taxable income if they pay interest on loans. Although deduction does not entirely offset the interest payments it at least lessens the financial impact of raising money through debt financing. Another benefit to debt financing is that firm's utilizing this form of financing are not required to publicly disclose of their plans as a condition of funding. The allows firms to maintain some degree of secrecy so that competitors are not made away of their future plans. The last benefit of debt financing that we'll discuss is that it avoids what is referred to as the dilution of ownership. We'll talk more about the dilution of ownership when we discuss equity financing. Although debt financing certainly has its advantages, like all things, there are some negative sides to raising money through debt financing. The first disadvantage is that a firm that uses debt financing is committing to making fixed payments, which include interest. This decreases a firm's cash flow. Firms that rely heavily in debt financing can run into cash flow problems that can jeopardize their financial stability. The next disadvantage to debt financing is that loans may come with certain restrictions. These restrictions can include things like collateral, which require the firm to pledge an asset against the loan. If the firm defaults on payments then the issuer can seize the asset and sell it to recover their investment. Another restriction is a covenant. Covenants are stipulations or terms placed on the loan that the firm must adhere to as a condition of the loan. Covenants can include restrictions on additional funding as well as restrictions on paying dividends. Equity financing involves acquiring funds from owners, who are also known as shareholders. Equity financing commonly involves the issuance of common stock in public and secondary offerings or the use of retained earnings. A benefit of using equity financing is the flexibility that it provides over debt financing. Equity financing does not come with the same collateral and covenants that can be imposed with debt financing. Another benefit to equity financing also does not increase a firms risk of default like debt financing does. A firm that utilizes equity financing does not pay interest, and although many firm's pay dividends to their investors they are under no obligation to do so. The downside to equity financing is that it produces no tax benefits and dilutes the ownership of existing shareholders. Dilution of ownership means that existing shareholders percentage of ownership decreases as the firm decides to issue additional shares. For example, lets say that you own 50 shares in ABC Company and there are 200 shares outstanding. This means that you hold a 25 percent stake in ABC Company. With such a large percentage of ownership you certainly have the power to affect decision-making. In order to raise additional funding ABC Company decides to issue 200 additional shares. You still hold 50 shares in the company, but now there are 400 shares outstanding. Which means you now hold a 12.5 percent stake in the company. Thus your ownership has been diluted due to the issuance of additional shares. A prime example of the dilution of ownership occurred in in the mid-2000's when Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin had his ownership stake reduced by the issuance of additional shares.
Episode 142: Mintzberg's Managerial Roles
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Video lecture reviewing the ten managerial roles developed by renowned management professor Henry Mintzberg.
Episode 84: Frederick Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory of Motivation
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To learn how Matt creates videos like this one, go here: http://bit.ly/1Blrcvt View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Developed in 1959 by psychologist Frederick Herzberg, the Two-Factor Theory of Motivation explains that certain factors in an organizational setting are responsible for producing extreme levels of satisfaction. Labeled by Herzberg as motivational factors, these factors can be a source of extreme levels of satisfaction if present but wouldn't produce extreme levels of dissatisfaction if absent. Through his work, Herzberg also determined that certain factors could not be a source of extreme satisifaction but could produce extreme dissatisfaction if absent. Herzberg labeled these hygiene factors, which include pay, benefits, job security, and friends in the workplace. In addition to providing an overview of Herzberg's Two Factor-Theory, we'll also discuss how it relates to Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and the impact that the Two Factor Theory poses for the workplace.
Views: 138104 Alanis Business Academy
Episode 162: The Path-Goal Theory of Leadership
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 What affect do subordinates and the environment have on leader behavior? Find out the answer to that question and more as we explore the Path-Goal Theory of Leadership.
Episode 77: Porter's Five Forces of Analysis: How to Determine the Attractiveness of an Industry
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To learn how Matt creates videos like this one, go here: http://bit.ly/1wgFq1w View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Porter's Five Forces of Analysis, also referred to as the competitive forces model, helps us to analyze the competitiveness of a given industry. This is an excellent tool for entrepreneurs who are considering starting a business in a certain industry. The five forces consist of: competitor rivalry, barriers to entry, threat of substitutes, supplier power, and buyer power.
Views: 181771 Alanis Business Academy
Episode 130: How to Calculate a Payback Period with Inconsistent Cash Flows
 
05:07
Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 The Payback Period is a simple capital budgeting tool used to help firms gauge the time required to recover their original investment. Although the payback period makes several significant assumptions, it still remains as a helpful tool to help firms better gauge various projects. In this video we'll calculate the payback period assuming that our cash flows fluctuate from one period to then next. For information on how to calculate the payback period with consistent cash flows, access the following link: http://tinyurl.com/mftr6v6
Episode 96: How the Boston Consulting Group (BCG) Growth-Share Matrix Works
 
15:09
Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To learn how Matt creates videos like this one, go here: http://bit.ly/1F0iHJ5 View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Developed by the Boston Consulting Group in the early 1970s, the BCG Matrix is a tool used to assist firms in determining how to allocate their resources in relation to product lines. Although the BCG matrix was designed to be used with products lines, it has applications for a variety of other settings.
Views: 151995 Alanis Business Academy
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs | Episode 21
 
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Developed by psychologist Abraham Maslow, the Hierarchy of Needs states we are motivated to engage in behaviors that have the highest probability of fulfilling unmet needs. Incorporating five levels of needs, Maslow's theory of motivation is one of the most influential theories and was the catalyst for the creation of many of the motivational theories that we see today. Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P
Views: 280889 Alanis Business Academy
Episode 59: How to Conduct a Breakeven Analysis
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P One of the tools that companies utilize to set prices is the breakeven analysis. This analysis helps companies determine the number of product units they would need to sell to cover their variable and fixed costs. In this brief video I'll walk you through how to calculate the breakeven point.
Views: 136241 Alanis Business Academy
Episode 119: Introduction to Mergers and Acquisitions
 
04:31
Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Companies have a few options for achieving growth. The first is by growing organically through the development of new products and production capacity over time. The other option, is through what are known as mergers and acquisitions. A merger occurs when two companies agree to combine to form an entirely new company. The two companies will agree on a post-merger name, like Exxon and Mobil combining to form ExxonMobil, and determine how to structure the new organization as well as staff operations. An acquisition occurs when one company purchases another company. The company that is purchased is then absorbed by the purchasing company and ceases to exist on its own. In some situations a company will purchase another, but allow it to operate independently and even keep its original name, such as when Disney purchased Pixar in 2006. This can be to ease the uncertainty associated with an acquisition as well as ensure the acquired company continues operations smoothly. In the case of Disney and Pixar, Pixar had proven to be successful prior to the acquisition and both companies wanted that success to continue unhindered by a new culture and even new staff. When classifying mergers and acquisitions we can label them as either horizontal or vertical. A horizontal merger or acquisition occurs when the two companies generally produce the same products and serve similar customers. The rationale behind such a merger is the newly merged company will be able to better compete in their respective industry by taking advantage of economies of scale and even technological innovation. It's also worth noting that horizontal acquisitions and mergers can allow companies to expand their product mix and potentially increase revenues by appealing to a wider customer base. Office Depot and Office Max, two retailers who sell similar products and serve similar customers, are currently in the process of completing a merger. This merger is meant to allow these companies the opportunity to compete more effectively against Internet retail giant Amazon. The joining of Office Depot and Office Max is an example of a horizontal merger. In 2012, Facebook acquired popular photo-sharing application Instagram for $1 billion in cash and stock. In addition to giving Facebook access to Instagram's successful mobile platform, it also eliminated a potential competitor while giving Facebook access to an additional group of customers. Facebook's acquisition of Instagram is an example of a horizontal acquisition since they both operate in a similar industry, providing a similar product to similar customers. Now a vertical merger or acquisition occurs when the two companies operate at different stages of the production cycle. Because these companies operate at different stages of the production cycle, the merger or acquisition can create increased operating efficiencies and reduce costs. For example, Google purchased Motorola Mobility in 2012 for $12.5 billion. Motorola Mobility is of course the manufacturer of handset devices while Google was beginning to producing and licensing its Android Operating System. In an effort to control both the hardware and software side of selling smartphones, Google acquired Motorola Mobility. This vertical acquisition allowed Google the opportunity to leverage Motorola Mobility's knowledge of the handset market as well as its staff and operations as opposed to starting from scratch or continuing to rely entirely on other companies for handsets. Coffee giant Starbucks also used a vertical acquisition to expand its offering of pastries and breads by purchasing San Francisco-based Bay Bread LLC, and its La Boulange bakery brand for $100 million in cash in April of this year. Although Starbucks had already sold pastries, this acquisition gave Starbucks control over a key player in the production cycle: the producer. Instead of purchasing pastries and other baked products from another business in the supply chain, Starbucks is now able to produce them in-house reducing its costs in the process. To subscribe to Alanis Business Academy for access to additional business content select the following link: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=mattalanis To access the Alanis Business Academy Youtube channel select the following link: http://www.youtube.com/user/mattalanis
Episode 3: Identifying Qualitative and Quantitative Variables
 
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There are two general types of variables included in statistics: quantitative variables and qualitative variables. In this video we'll define each of these variables and provide examples. Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4
Episode 161: Introduction to the Goal-Setting Theory
 
06:24
Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 Goal-Setting Theory is based on the belief that our conscious goals affect our behavior, and subsequently our performance. So in this episode, we look into why goal-setting is effective, how to incorporate goal-setting theory in your personal or professional lives, and lastly, we talk about the hidden cost of goal-setting theory.
Episode 131: How to Calculate the Profitability Index
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P The Profitability Index is a capital budgeting tool used to evaluate the potential return of a project. Like all capital budgeting tools, the profitability index can be very helpful when comparing the potential returns of various capital budgeting proposals. Similar to the net present value (NPV), the profitability index requires a knowledge of the present value of future cash flows as well as the initial investment required to start the project. In this video we'll explore how to calculate the profitability index and compare the profitability index to the net present value.
Episode 151: Planning in an Organizational Setting
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 Just like individuals, organizations engage in the process of planning. Although more complex, the rational behind planning for the organization is very similar to that of people. Planning serves to assist an organization in not only identifying goals, but also developing strategies to achieve those goals. In this video we'll discuss the different levels of planning in the organization and discuss the roles that managers at all levels of the organization play in the planning process.
Episode 51: The Product Life Cycle
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To learn how Matt creates videos like this one, go here: http://bit.ly/1BgDuX5 View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P The product life cycle represents a series of stages that products--similar to people--go through over the course of their lives. Marketers use their knowledge of the product life cycle to alter their marketing strategies related to specific products. In this video I'll explain the product life cycle and provide examples of products that fit into each of the stages.
Views: 159470 Alanis Business Academy
Episode 154: Innovation and the S-Curve: Why More Money Doesn't Always Lead to Greater Improvements
 
07:08
Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 The s-curve represents a predictable pattern of behavior that technology cycles follow. Designed to help managers understand how to allocate resources in reference to various types of technology, the s-curve is a product of technological development. During the early stages of innovation, expenditures of effort often lead to small improvements in the performance of that technology. As the technology begins to develop, similar expenditures of effort begin to produce larger improvements in performance.
Episode 139: Introduction to the SWOT Analysis: The Art of Conducting a Situational Analysis
 
07:51
Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P A SWOT Analysis is a tool used to complete an objective analysis of a company. In addition to taking an internal look at the company (strengths and weaknesses), companies also need to scan the external environment to identify both opportunities and threats. In this week's video we revisit the SWOT Analysis.
Episode 121: How to Calculate a Current and Quick Ratio
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 Both the current and quick ratios use information off of the balance sheet to measure the liquidity of a firm. With these ratios, we're attempting to gauge whether or not the firm could cover its short-term obligations if the firm were to experience cash flow problems. In short, the current and quick ratios help us evaluate whether or not a firm has enough current assets, meaning assets that are cash or can be converted to cash within a year, to meet its short-term debt obligations. These short-term debt obligations are known as current liabilities, and they include any liabilities that will become due within one year. Common current assets include cash, cash equivalents, accounts receivable, inventories, as well as other short-term investments. Common current liabilities include things like accounts payable, wages payable, interest payable, as well as other short-term debt obligations. Now that we've discussed the basic elements of both ratios lets walk through how to actually calculate them. Lets start with the current ratio. To calculate the current ratio you first need to determine the amount of a firms current assets and current liabilities. These are commonly reported in total on a firms balance sheet as separate entries. Once you've located both current assets and current liabilities, divide the firm's current assets by its current liabilities. Although a current ratio of 2.0 is considered adequate for most industries you'll want to look at what is common for the industry. A current ratio of 2.0 may be great for some industries, but it may be dangerously low for others. The quick ratio is almost identical to the current ratio, however it attempts to solve one dangerous assumption that the current ratio makes. Is it reasonable for a firm to assume that it will be able to convert all of its inventory into cash within the next year? Unfortunately it isn't. The truth is that inventory becomes obsolete quickly, especially for technology goods. Inventory also becomes damaged, stolen, and often just sits on store shelves. This assumption can be particularly harmful for a retailer, which often carries a large percentage of its current assets in inventory due to the very nature of its business. In order to take a more conservative approach to gauging the liquidity of a firm we use the quick ratio. In order to calculate the quick ratio we still gather the current assets and the current liabilities of a firm, but prior to our calculations we deduct inventories from current assets. That way we're not assuming a firms inventory will be there to assist in covering their current liabilities. Now truthfully some inventory, maybe even a large percentage of it, will be sold. However, just in case it doesn't we're prepared. Generally a quick ratio of 1.0 is adequate, so you could say that we have some liquidity issues given our current financial position. Once again though, researching the industry average will help us get a more accurate gauge on what is an acceptable quick ratio.
Episode 120: Common and Preferred Stock
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Both large institutional investors like pension funds and insurance companies, as well as smaller investors saving for retirement have a number of different investment options. Some of the primary options include stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and exchange traded funds. In this video we're going to focus on the characteristics of two types of stock, common stock and preferred stock. Stock is a type of investment security that signifies partial ownership of a corporation and a claim on on that corporation's assets as well as earnings. Stock is a form of equity financing, which allows a corporation access to potentially large amounts of money during initial as well as secondary public offerings. The corporation first must determine how much money it wants to raise. Then the corporation, with the help of an investment bank, will establish what percentage of ownership it must give up to obtain the investment that it is seeking. This chunk of ownership is then sliced up into individuals shares and sold for a price set by the corporation and its investment bank, each share of course representing fractional ownership in the corporation. In exchange for the investors hard earn money, the corporation provides ownership rights and a claim on the corporation's assets and earnings. Investors acquire shares with the hope that the stock increases in value. Investors can then sell their shares for more than they acquired them, which would earn them more money. Investors may also receive a dividend, which is a quarterly payment made to stockholders as a way of rewarded them for their investment. Although both common and preferred stock provide ownership rights and a claim on assets and earnings, they differ in several areas. Common stock gives the owner with the opportunity to vote in board member elections and other issues outlined in the corporate bylaws. This allows investors the opportunity to elect a board member who they feel will best represent their own interests. Common stock also provides a right to dividends. Now this right is not the same as a guarantee, so a corporation is under no obligation to pay a dividend. However, if a corporation authorizes a dividend then shareholders have a right to that dividend assuming they own it by the dividend cut-off date. In addition to a right to dividends, common stockholders also receive a right to capital gains.This right is not a guarantee and stockholders may even lose their investment, which makes the stock a riskier investment. Some corporation's may be even provide certain shareholders with pre-emptive rights, which grant shareholders the opportunity to purchase additional shares if the corporation decides to sell shares to the public. This prevents current shareholders ownership from being diluted, since they would have the same number of shares but more shares would be outstanding after the secondary offering. Typically pre-emptive rights are only granted to large shareholders who have invested a significant amount of money in a corporation. Preferred stock is a type of security that grants the holder preference over common stockholders in certain areas. Although both securities provide owners with a claim on assets and earnings, the claim of preferred stockholders is given priority to that of common stockholders.In addition to a preceding claim on assets, preferred stockholders are also given preference with dividend payments. Like common stockholders, preferred stockholders are not guaranteed a dividend, but must be paid a dividend in the event that the corporation grants a dividend to common stockholders. Also, a dividend to preferred stockholders tends to be a fixed amount while a dividend for common stockholders may fluctuate. Because preferred stockholders are given preference over common stockholders in these areas, the price of acquiring a share of preferred stock is more expensive. Also, preferred stockholders do not receive voting rights, meaning they cannot vote in board member elections or other matters as outlined in the corporate bylaws. Lastly, opportunities to purchase preferred stock are also more difficult to come by.
Introduction to Marketing: The Importance of Product, Price, Place, & Promotion | Episode 118
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Marketing is everything involved in creating, communicating, and delivering value to customers, clients, and even society. Marketing is involved in everything from the market research that goes into determining what products consumers are looking for, to the message that is transmitted to consumers to inform them about a product and even persuade them to purchase it. In between those stages, marketing also plays a prominent role in determining how the product should look, designing the packaging that will enclose the product, deciding whether to sell the product through traditional retailers or entirely online, and establishing a price point that is not only attractive to consumers but allows gives the business the opportunity to be profitable. Now when most people think of marketing they often think of advertising, which is completely understandable given we are are constantly exposed to advertisements at home, at the office, and even during our commutes. Although advertising is a component of marketing it certainly does not explain the entire subject. In fact, advertising is simply one of the four different types of promotion, and promotion is one of the four main elements of marketing. So you can see that advertising, like the other marketing elements, merely plays a role in helping businesses create, communicate, and deliver a single unified message to potential customers. So how does a businesses create, communicate, and deliver value to its customers? Although there are many variables at work, a business can increase the probability of success by creating an effective and consistent marketing mix. Often referred to as the 4 P's, the market mix is a collection of four elements that outline the strategy for how a business intends to reach its customers. These four elements include product, place, promotion, and price. The product includes the tangible product or intangible service that will be used to fulfill a customer need or want. The features of a product, its physical form, packaging, warranties, and even after-sale service are all included under the product strategy. Place includes how a business intends to get products from the location they are produced to where they can ultimately be consumed by consumers. Place is often referred to as distribution since we are dealing with logistics. However, place not only includes the physical distribution of the product but also the channel through which it will be sold. Promotion involves establishing the most effective method for communicating with its customers about the various products that it sells. Promotion is primarily meant to communicate, inform, and persuade. An effective promotion strategy, like the other marketing mix elements, depends upon a businesses knowledge of its target customer. This knowledge allows a business to select the best way to communicate with its core audience and ultimately increase the success of its communications. The last element of the market mix is price. Price is the easiest marketing mix element to alter from a technical sense, however it is the most difficult thing to change. The reason is that altering the price of a product affects what consumers pay for that product, and a business can only charge as much as the market is willing to pay for a product. Technically a business can charge whatever price it wants, but that does not mean that consumers have to pay that price. Like the other marketing mix elements, price can send a message to consumers. For example, many believe that maintaining low prices is the best method to attract consumers. Although this can be an effective pricing strategy for certain items, it can also confuse consumers. For example, Tiffany & Co. sells expensive jewelry and is known for high quality and is one of the most recognizable brands. Because Tiffany & Co is known for quality and maybe even exclusivity, it wouldn't benefit from a low price point. Dealing with the psychological aspect of pricing, consumers tend to view less expensive items as cheap in quality compared to their more expensive counterparts. Although this doesn't always hold to be true, businesses are very aware of the impact that price can have on the perceptions of consumers.
Episode 124: The Time Value of Money: Why Your Money is Worth Less and Less
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 The time value of money, commonly abbreviated as simply TVM, is the idea that money loses value over time. You may have heard the saying one dollar received today is worth more than one dollar received tomorrow. What this attempts to explain is the fact that the value of your hard earned money decreases each and every day. As an example, lets say that that your friend asked you for $500 with the promise to repay you that same amount in twelve months. Although you may be inclined to help your friend out this wouldn't be a great financial decision. But why? You're still receiving that same $500 you loaned him or her twelve months ago. The truth is, that although the numerical value of your $500 remains unchanged, you incur several costs by not having it in your possession. The first and probably the most obvious cost that you incur is inflation. Inflation is the increase in the price of goods and services over a period of time. Inflation generally runs at about two percent annually, although it has been quite less as of late. So if you hold your money for that period of time, what you can do with that money actually decreases. The financial equation to determine a present value is as follows: PV equals FV divided by one plus i to the nth power. In this equation, PV is the present value of our money and what we are trying to determine. FV represents that future value of our money, which is $500 . i represents the interest rate that we intend to discount or reduce our $500 by. Generally for discounting purposes the interest rate represents what we could've received if you had the money in our possession and put it to good use. In this case, we are going to discount our money by an inflation rate of two percent to reflect its diminished value. The last bit of data we need is the number of periods or n, which will be one to reflect the number of years we are going to discount our $500 by. The second reason that money decreases in value over time is due to opportunity costs. An opportunity cost represents what you give up by loaning the $500 to your friend. More specifically, the opportunity cost represents the next best alternative. What that is depends upon your unique situation. It could be investing in the stock market, placing the money in a savings account, or even spending it on new clothes. Unfortunately you incur an opportunity cost by giving up possession of your money. Now as a result of both inflationary pressures and opportunity costs your $500 will be worth less in twelve months. This is why banks charge interest on loans and why consumers expect to earn some type of interest when they place their money in a bank. It's simply being compensated for the costs that they incur by not having the money in their possession at this moment in time.
Episode 4: Levels of Measurement (Scale Measurement)
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 Four common types of measurement, often referred to as scale measurement, exist in statistics. These levels of measurement include: nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio scales. In this video, we'll talk about the different levels of measurement as well as provide examples of each scale.
Episode 170: The Impact of a Strong U.S. Dollar
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb Want to watch exclusive ad-free content from Alanis Business Academy? Become an Alanis Business Academy Premium Subscriber: http://bit.ly/1QF0KF7 To learn how Matt developed this video, go here: http://bit.ly/182vL3z Over the past six months, the U.S. dollar has been strengthening relative to other currencies. But what does this mean? In this video we'll look into how exchange rates impact tourism, imports, and exports by comparing the U.S. dollar to the Euro. View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4
Episode 144: Administrative Management and Henri Fayol's 14 Principles of Management
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P This video covers Henri Fayol's 14 Principles of Management. Widely accepted and followed today, Fayol's 14 Principles of Management establish a general outline for executives on how to engage in effective management.
How the Communication Process Works | Episode 20
 
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The video is part of a course that I teach on business communication. During this brief video I'll explain how the communication process works and provide examples to reinforce the concepts discussed. Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P
Views: 188516 Alanis Business Academy
Episode 101: How to Use Market Segmentation: Developing a Target Market
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To learn how Matt creates videos like this one, go here: http://bit.ly/1CQXEJl View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Market segmentation is a commonly utilized concept in business where a larger market of consumers is divided into smaller groups of consumers who share certain characteristics. The goal is to generate what is known as a target market, which is an identifiable group of consumers who behave in a similar way, have similar interests, and share similar characteristics. Firms utilize demographic, geographic, psychographic, and behavioral segmentation as a way of generating a target market. In this updated video on market segmentation we discuss the target market as wel as explain how firms use market segmentation to generate a target market. If you have any questions after viewing the video please post them in the comment box below and I'll do my best to answer them as soon as I can. Thanks for watching!
Views: 123424 Alanis Business Academy
Episode 127: How to Calculate the Internal Rate of Return | Part 1
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P The Internal Rate of Return, or IRR for short, is the discount rate that causes the net present value to equal zero. As a type of capital budgeting tool, the IRR allows managers and business owners the ability to weight a variety of different capital budgeting projects. The video provides a brief description and purpose of IRR in addition to showing how to calculate the internal rate of return. It is recommended that viewers have an understanding of the time value of money and how to calculate both the present value and NPV prior to learning IRR. The following videos are resources that will detail these topics. The Time Value of Money: http://youtu.be/35RkSTjCCx0 How the Calculate the Net Present Value: http://youtu.be/jylJ2r9bklE
Episode 159: Introduction to Human Resource Management
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 Human Resource Management (HRM) is described as the process of developing the policies, practices, and systems designed to influence employee motivation, behavior, and performance. In this video, we'll take a closer look at human resource management and specifically talk about the different functional areas of HRM.
Episode 82: Introduction to Company Formation: How General and Limited Partnerships Work
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P SoundCloud: http://bit.ly/1hNcJ2k Partnerships represent a common form of business ownership for businesses with more than one owner. The most common type of partnership is a general partnership. Typically--but not always--a general partnership places equal responsibility on the general partners. Both partners are also personally liable for the debts of the business. Due to the unattractive nature of unlimited liability, business owners can also elect to utilize a limited partnership. Although they share many similarities to a general partnership, limited partnerships establish almost a tiered system (general partners and limited partners) allowing some owners to incur greater risk while others can be involved with relatively low risk.
Episode 53: Introduction to Marketing: The Promotional Mix
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Businesses use promotion to educate, inform, and persuade consumers about themselves, their products, and their services. With a variety of promotional methods available to them, businesses need to develop a strategy so that they promote their products in a unified and effective fashion. This strategy is what's known as the promotional mix. In this video I'll describe each element of the promotional mix as well as explain how each is used to enhance a businesses marketing efforts.
The Penetration Pricing Strategy
 
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Penetration pricing is a common pricing strategy used by businesses. To employ effective penetration pricing, businesses start by offering a product at a low price point. By doing so, the business is hoping to attract new customers and increase its share of the market. Once the business has increased its market share, it will slowly begin to increase prices to a point where they can offer the product in a profitable manner. To learn more about penetration pricing, as well as the conditions that need to exist for the strategy to be effective, watch the following video. Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P
The Equity Theory of Motivation | Episode 47
 
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Equity theory is often used to help explain the motivation and behavior of employees in the organization. In this video I'll explain equity theory along with how it impacts employee and organizational behavior. Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P
How Government Uses Fiscal Policy to Influence the Economy | Episode 23
 
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Governments rely on both fiscal and monetary policy as a means of influencing economic conditions. While monetary policy revolves around the government controlling the money supply and interest rates, fiscal policy involves the governments use of taxation and spending to influence the economy. Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P
Episode 132: How to Measure Gross Domestic Product
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 Gross domestic product, often referred to as GDP, is the total market value of all goods and services produced within a nation's borders over a specified period of time. Considered to be the income of a country, GDP is the most widely cited indicator and used to gauge the health of a nation's economy. In this video we'll discuss some of the different sources of spending included in the over gross domestic product of a country. After watching this video you'll have a better understanding of GDP as well as what is included in this popular indicator.
Episode 61: Human Resource Management: Human Resource Planning
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P The planning stage of human resource management involves: conducting a job analysis, forecasting the supply and demand of labor, and matching the supply of labor with consumer demand. In this brief video I'll describe each of these elements and explain the process of planning in the area of human resources.
Episode 152: The Rational Decision Making Model
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 Learn about the rational decision making model and how to use it to make better decisions.
Episode 156: Lewin's Force Field Analysis
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 Developed in 1951 by sociologist Kurt Lewin, the Force Field Analysis is a technique used to evaluate the forces in an environment that encourage and work against change. Lewin identified these forces as driving and restraining forces. By identifying these forces, organizations put themselves in a position to develop strategies to help implement change.
Introduction to Economics: Scarcity and Opportunity Cost | Episode 35
 
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We all have to make difficult choices when deciding how to spend our time and money. But why? In this video I'll highlight what is a building block of economics: scarcity. I'll also explain how to evaluate the cost of our decisions within an economic framework. Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P SoundCloud: http://bit.ly/1hNcJ2k
Episode 54: The Difference Between Goods & Services
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P SoundCloud: http://bit.ly/1hNcJ2k Products consists of anything that provides value to consumers. Within the broad category of products we place company offerings into two categories: goods and services. While goods present physical offerings, services share a different set of characteristics. In this video lecture I discuss the difference between goods and services and also discuss the important characteristics of services.
Episode 5: Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4 Learn about measures of central tendency (i.e. mean, median, and mode) as well as measures of dispersion (i.e. range, mean deviation, variance, and standard deviation) in this video from the statistics series of Alanis Business Academy.
Episode 171: How to Create Your Lean Canvas
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To learn how Matt creates videos like this one, go here: http://bit.ly/1C23yB6 Business Model Generation PDF: http://bit.ly/1x7Vmyb Business Model Generation on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1BXvtqQ Lean Canvas: http://bit.ly/1GwuWib The lean canvas is a tool used to design, validate, and pivot a business model. Based on the lean philosophy espoused by Eric Ries in the popular book Lean Startup, the lean canvas helps an entrepreneur understand the building blocks of their business model. By designing a business model using the lean canvas, entrepreneurs can work to identify the assumptions present in their model and work to test those assumptions. View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Listen to Alanis Business Academy on the go by downloading our new podcast: iTunes: http://bit.ly/1dwKyWi Stitcher: http://bit.ly/PvPjoa Tunein: http://bit.ly/1gLsDH4
How to Complete a SWOT Analysis | Episode 24
 
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A SWOT Analysis is a tool used to complete an objective analysis of a company. In addition to taking an internal look at the company (strengths and weaknesses), companies also need to scan the external environment to identify both opportunities and threats. In this video I'll explain what a SWOT Analysis is, and provide some examples of what can be considered in each category. Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P
Views: 286486 Alanis Business Academy
Episode 73: Measuring the Money Supply: The Difference Between M1 and M2
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P SoundCloud: http://bit.ly/1hNcJ2k In order for the Federal Reserve to determine to what extent it can expand or contract the supply of money, it must first determine how much money is available in circulation. Two methods of measuring the supply of money include: M1 and M2.
Episode 109: Douglas McGregor's Theory X & Theory Y
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb View additional videos from Alanis Business Academy and interact with us on our social media pages: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P Developed in 1960 by Douglas McGregor, Theory X & Theory Y presents two contrasting views of human behavior in the workplace. As the classical theory of human behavior, Theory X presents employees as lazy, unambitious individuals who need to be directed and controlled to accomplish organizational objecties. The alternative theory, Theory Y, presents employees in general as motivated, ambitious individuals who take a genuine interest in their work and are motivated by more than simply the fulfillment of physiological and security needs. If you have any questions please post a comment in the comments back and I'll get back to you as soon as I can. Thanks for watching.