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Business Analysis Using User Stories
 
03:46
Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/business-analysis-using-user-stories/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eCourse "Writing Effective User Stories". View full course description and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/. Prefer reading? Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00E8IRUDK/. DESCRIPTION In this KnowledgeKnugget™ you will learn what User Stories are, where they fit in an agile or waterfall methodology, and how they fit into the requirements taxonomy. User stories are a great addition to our repertoire of ways of expressing stakeholder requirements. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What are the components of a good User Story? 2. How do User Stories fit into the requirements taxonomy? SIGN UP at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 59071 BA-EXPERTS
What Is A Use Case
 
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This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) teaches you how to create a simple Use Case. Watch the full-length video for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/what-is-a-use-case/. For a more in-depth treatment, see our online or traditional classroom course “Writing and Managing LEAN Use Cases – Simply Put!”. View Description and Outline at https://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/how-to-write-document-manage-use-cases/ DESCRIPTION: Defining Interaction Between People and Technology as Functional Requirements for IT Applications. Use cases are a fundamental and phenomenal tool for defining the requirements of an IT solutions. They show how people will interact with a proposed IT solution – and how the application will interact with other applications. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What is the purpose of a Use Case? 2. What does a Use Case Look Like? 3. How can I get started Creating a Use Case?
Views: 152002 BA-EXPERTS
Business Data Modeling: Getting Informational Requirements for IT
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/business-data-modeling-informational-requirements/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is an overview of information modeling for the business expert or business analyst. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/. Data Models are hard to understand for the business expert. But to get the data/information requirements right they are critical. This KK teaches you in simple terms what data/information models are and how you can interpret them. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What is a business data model? 2. Why do you need one? For more requirements training, check out our self-paced eCourses at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/self-paced-business-analysis-courses-online/.
Views: 32225 BA-EXPERTS
How to Facilitate Requirements Gathering Workshops (aka JAD, JRP, JAR, JAD/R)
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/how-to-run-requirements-workshops/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of the eCourse “Requirements Elicitation Interviews and Workshops — Simply Put!”. View the full course description and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-elicitation-interviews-workshops/. DESCRIPTION: In this KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) you will learn a fast-track approach to getting user requirements from a diverse group of stakeholders. Requirements Gathering Workshops set the stage for successful IT projects by getting the right people together to define Business, Stakeholder, Solution (functional and non-functional), and Transition Requirements. You can use a Requirements Gathering Workshop to elicit initial requirement statements for traditional methodologies or to seed a Product Backlog with User Stories for Agile development. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What is a Requirements Gathering Workshop? 2. How can it benefit your project / company? ABOUT THE COURSE: This 90-minute course describes the concept of eliciting requirements and explains its necessity. It defines and contrasts 5 specific types of interviews for helping subject matter experts discover their requirements. Since interviewing is not an intuitive skill, we also present a wide range of interviewing techniques and define the characteristics of a good requirements interviewer. To guide you through the intricacies of conducting group interviews, we dedicate an entire section to facilitating Requirements Gathering Workshops (JAD, RDW, User Story Workshops, etc.), a powerful requirements definition technique for cross-functional groups on traditional and Agile software development methodologies. Upon completion of the entire course, you can: • Define and distinguish five specific requirements elicitation approaches from one-on-one Requirements Interviews to Requirements Gathering Workshops • Evaluate the pros and cons of each approach for your organization and project • Prepare, perform, and manage effective requirements gathering interviews and workshops • Use informational and active listening to discover hidden requirements during interviews and workshops • Recognize the specific challenges and strengths of facilitated requirements workshops involving cross-functional groups of stakeholders • Improve your interviewing skills by analyzing the best-practice attitudes and characteristics of effective interviewers SIGN UP for the full course today at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-elicitation-interviews-workshops/ To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 34836 BA-EXPERTS
What Are Business, Stakeholder, and Solution Requirements?
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/what-are-business-requirements-stakeholder-solution/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eCourse "Business Analysis Defined". Take the full version at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00K7MM50O/. DESCRIPTION: In this KnowledgeKnugget™ you will learn about several types of software requirements including different levels of detail as defined by the International Institute of Business Analysis® (Business, Stakeholder, Solution, and Transition Requirements). Each of the requirement levels is useful for a different time in your project or initiative. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What do we mean with requirements? 2. What flavors of requirements are interesting for IT projects? ABOUT THE ECOURSE: The eCourse “Business Analysis Defined” describes how business analysis is currently practiced. The authors provide insight into this fast-growing field by distinguishing strategic, tactical, and operational business analysis. It provides surveys of what Business Analysts really do and what business analysis techniques people use most often when they are the one “wearing the BA hat”. You will learn what “requirements” really are and what different types of requirements exist. Because many requirements define future information technology (IT) solutions, the authors share their experience on how Waterfall, Iterative, Agile, and Experimental (aka “Chaotic”) Software Development methodologies impact the business analysis responsibility. Upon completion of this course, you can: • Identify and categorize best practices • Defend the need for good requirements • Classify four requirement types • Identify the critical skills required by business analysts • Describe the tools used • Relate the evolving role of today’s business analyst • Discuss how SDMs like Waterfall, Iterative, and Agile affect business analysis activities VIEW COURSE OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. To view even more requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 31845 BA-EXPERTS
User Stories: Agile Requirements Definition (Part 1)
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/keep-your-user-story-simple/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eCourse "Writing Effective User Stories". View full course description and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/. Prefer reading? Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00E8IRUDK/. DESCRIPTION Rule 1 in How To Write Effective User Stories that Express Business Needs and Minimize Misunderstandings. Well-structured User Stories express a single action to achieve a specific goal from the perspective of a single role. Trying to express too much in a User Story adds confusion and increases the amount of discussion needed for developers to understand what the story really means. In this KnowledgeKnugget™ you will learn how to translate business needs into well-structured User Stories. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What structure should you use for a user story? 2. How can you limit the need for discussion over the meaning of a user story? SIGN UP at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 84527 BA-EXPERTS
An Overview of Business Analysis for Information Technology
 
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Watch the full version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/what-is-business-analysis-overview-it/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is also part of an eCourse "Business Analysis Defined". Get the course outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00K7MM50O/. DESCRIPTION: Although the field of IT Business Analysis offers great career opportunities for those seeking employment, some business analysis skills are essential for any adult in the business world today. This KnowledgeKnugget™ is an introduction to the field and defines business analysis as it is currently practiced. You will learn some core business analysis (BA) methods and concepts. The authors also provide insight into this fast-growing field by distinguishing strategic, tactical, and operational business analysis. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What is the goal of business analysis? 2. Why has it become important? ABOUT THE ECOURSE: The eCourse “Business Analysis Defined” describes how business analysis is currently practiced. The authors provide insight into this fast-growing field by distinguishing strategic, tactical, and operational business analysis. It provides surveys of what Business Analysts really do and what business analysis techniques people use most often when they are the one “wearing the BA hat”. You will learn what “requirements” really are and what different types of requirements exist. Because many requirements define future information technology (IT) solutions, the authors share their experience on how Waterfall, Iterative, Agile, and Experimental (aka “Chaotic”) Software Development methodologies impact the business analysis responsibility. Upon completion of this course, you can: • Identify and categorize best practices • Defend the need for good requirements • Classify four requirement types • Identify the critical skills required by business analysts • Describe the tools used • Relate the evolving role of today’s business analyst • Discuss how SDMs like Waterfall, Iterative, and Agile affect business analysis activities VIEW COURSE OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. To view even more requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 35788 BA-EXPERTS
Business Analysis and System Development Methodologies (SDM)
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/business-analysis-sdm-system-development-methodologies/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eCourse "Business Analysis Defined". Take the full version at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00K7MM50O/. DESCRIPTION: Although the field of IT Business Analysis offers great career opportunities for those seeking employment, some business analysis skills are essential for any adult in the business world today. In this KnowledgeKnugget™ you will learn what different types of software development methodologies (SDM) exist and how each affects your business analysis activities and requirements gathering efforts. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What is a "System Development Methodology"? 2. How does it affect business analysis? ABOUT THE ECOURSE: The eCourse “Business Analysis Defined” describes how business analysis is currently practiced. The authors provide insight into this fast-growing field by distinguishing strategic, tactical, and operational business analysis. It provides surveys of what Business Analysts really do and what business analysis techniques people use most often when they are the one “wearing the BA hat”. You will learn what “requirements” really are and what different types of requirements exist. Because many requirements define future information technology (IT) solutions, the authors share their experience on how Waterfall, Iterative, Agile, and Experimental (aka “Chaotic”) Software Development methodologies impact the business analysis responsibility. Upon completion of this course, you can: • Identify and categorize best practices • Defend the need for good requirements • Classify four requirement types • Identify the critical skills required by business analysts • Describe the tools used • Relate the evolving role of today’s business analyst • Discuss how SDMs like Waterfall, Iterative, and Agile affect business analysis activities VIEW COURSE OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. To view even more requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 25963 BA-EXPERTS
What Techniques Do Business Analysts Use?
 
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This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eCourse "Business Analysis Defined". VIEW COURSE OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00K7MM50O/. DESCRIPTION: Although the field of IT Business Analysis offers great career opportunities for those seeking employment, some business analysis skills are essential for any adult in the business world today. For example, the task of defining the requirements for an IT solution is handed to Business Analysts as well as Subject Matter Experts, Developers, System Analysts, Product Owners, Project Managers, Line Managers, or any other business expert. Applying business analysis techniques to define their business needs results in much higher chances for a successful IT project. In this KnowledgeKnugget™ you will learn what business analysis techniques and tools are most commonly used around the world based on surveys of actual business analysts. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What are the primary activities in business analysis? 2. What tools or techniques do they use? To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/. PARTIAL TRANSCRIPT: Business analysis is the process of studying a business or any other organization to identify business opportunities / problem areas and suggest potential solutions. A wide range of people with various titles, roles and responsibilities actually apply business analysis techniques within an organization. There are three fundamentally different flavors or levels of business analysis: 1. Strategic Business Analysis (aka Enterprise Analysis) (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/strategic-business-analysis/ ) 2. Tactical Business Analysis (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/tactical-business-analysis/) 3. Operational Business Analysis (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/operational-business-analysis/Operational Business Analysis) Strategic Business Analysis is the study of business visions, goals, objectives, and strategies of an organization or an organizational unit to identify the desired future. It encompasses the analysis of existing organizational structure, policies, politics, problems, opportunities, and application architecture to build a business case for change. This analysis employs business analysis techniques such as Variance Analysis, Feasibility Analysis, Force Field Analysis, Decision Analysis, and Key Performance Indicators to support senior management in the decision-making process. The primary outcome of this work is a set of defined, prioritized projects and initiatives that the organization will undertake to create the desired future. If the initiative includes the development of software using an Agile Software Development Methodology (SDM) (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/business-analysis-agile-methodologies/), strategic business analysis techniques identify themes and/or epics, and initiate a product backlog. Tactical Business Analysis is at the project or initiative level to flush out the details of the proposed solution and to ensure that it meets the needs of the business community. Commonly used business analysis techniques at this level include Stakeholder Identification (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/how-to-identify-stakeholders-it-projects/), Interviewing (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/requirements-elicitation-gathering-business-stakeholder-it-requirements/), Facilitation (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/how-to-facilitate-requirements-gathering-workshops/), Baselining, Coverage Matrices, MoSCoW Analysis (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/requirements-prioritization-two-simple-techniques/), Benchmarking, Business Rules Analysis, Change Management, Process and Data Modeling (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/business-data-modeling-informational-requirements/), and Functional Decomposition (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-exposing-functional-and-non-functional-requirements/). In an Agile environment, Tactical Business Analysis adds to the Product Backlog and/or Release Plans expressed in Themes, Business Epics, Architecture Epics, User Stories (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/), and User Story Epics. In a traditional setting, the primary outcome of Tactical Business Analysis is a set of textual and/or modeled Business and Stakeholder Requirements (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-requirements/). ..........
Views: 272768 BA-EXPERTS
Non-Functional Requirements Add Value to User Stories (Part 5)
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/non-functional-requirements-user-stories/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eCourse "Writing Effective User Stories". View full course description and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/. Prefer reading? Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00E8IRUDK/. Rule 5 in How To Write Effective User Stories that Express Business Needs and Minimize Misunderstandings. In this KnowledgeKnugget™ you will learn how to elaborate user stories to identify measurable non-functional requirements. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. How do you express non-functional (quality) requirements? 2. What value do non-functional requirements add to your user stories? SIGN UP at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 25846 BA-EXPERTS
Business Analysis and Agile Methodologies
 
03:31
Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/business-analysis-agile-methodologies/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eCourse "Business Analysis Defined". Take the full version at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00K7MM50O/. DESCRIPTION: Although the field of IT Business Analysis offers great career opportunities for those seeking employment, some business analysis skills are essential for any adult in the business world today. In this KnowledgeKnugget™ you will learn how Agile Software Development approaches affect business analysis activities and requirements gathering efforts. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What is Agile software development? 2. How does it affect your business analysis activities? ABOUT THE ECOURSE: The eCourse “Business Analysis Defined” describes how business analysis is currently practiced. The authors provide insight into this fast-growing field by distinguishing strategic, tactical, and operational business analysis. It provides surveys of what Business Analysts really do and what business analysis techniques people use most often when they are the one “wearing the BA hat”. You will learn what “requirements” really are and what different types of requirements exist. Because many requirements define future information technology (IT) solutions, the authors share their experience on how Waterfall, Iterative, Agile, and Experimental (aka “Chaotic”) Software Development methodologies impact the business analysis responsibility. Upon completion of this course, you can: • Identify and categorize best practices • Defend the need for good requirements • Classify four requirement types • Identify the critical skills required by business analysts • Describe the tools used • Relate the evolving role of today’s business analyst • Discuss how SDMs like Waterfall, Iterative, and Agile affect business analysis activities VIEW COURSE OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. To view even more requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 49246 BA-EXPERTS
Business Process Analysis for Requirements Discovery
 
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Watch the full-length video for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/business-process-analysis-requirements-definition/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eBook "Dataflow Diagramming by Example" http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/dataflow-diagramming-example/. Analyzing a Business Process Model uncovers problems and identifies potential solution requirements. You need to know what the different types of diagrams express and how to analyze each. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What Is Business Process Analysis? 2. What types of Business Process Models can you use? 3. What specific analysis techniques are effective? The eCourse "Dataflow Diagramming by Example" will be available soon. Check regularly at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/self-paced-business-analysis-courses-online/.   To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 19177 BA-EXPERTS
Writing User Stories that Are In Scope of Your Project (Part 3)
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/writing-user-stories-in-scope/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eCourse "Writing Effective User Stories". View full course description and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/. Prefer reading? Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00E8IRUDK/. DESCRIPTION Rule 3 in How To Write Effective User Stories that Express Business Needs and Minimize Misunderstandings. As the author of User Stories, you need to focus on writing stories that the delivered solution will provide. Ensuring that your User Stories are relevant, meaning in scope for your project, reduces the time wasted writing and elaborating unneeded User Stories. Knowing what should become a user story is potentially more challenging for the author than knowing how to structure it. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. How can the SME decide whether a potential user story is relevant (in scope for the project)? 2. Why is relevance important? SIGN UP at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 27453 BA-EXPERTS
How to Draw a Data Flow Diagram
 
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This KnowledgeKnugget™ is an overview of Data Flow Diagrams. If you want to learn step by step how to create Data Flow Diagrams (DFDs), Context-level DFDs, and Rigorous Physical Process Models (RPPM), take the full 18 lectures 1.5 hours) eCourse “Data Flow Diagrams Simply Put!” at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. Prefer reading? Try the ebook version at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/dataflow-diagramming-example/. DESCRIPTION: Getting from someone’s explanations of how they do their job to usable and accurate workflow descriptions can be a daunting proposition. In this 8 minute KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK™), recognized business analysis expert Tom Hathaway explains what a DFD is, which symbols are allowed, and what each symbol means. A good DFD is the baseline for identifying problems and defining the requirements for any solution from the business perspective. ABOUT THE COURSE: This course answers the following questions: • What is a Data Flow Diagram (DFD)? • What is a Rigorous Physical Process Model? • What is a Context-Level DFD? • Why should I use Data Flow Diagrams? • What symbols can I use on each type of diagram? • How can I drill down into a process? • How can I show internal processes and flows that produce the results? • What does balancing a Data Flow Diagram mean and what is the business value? • What is the most efficient approach to balancing a DFD? • What business value do process specifications offer? • How can I express detailed specifications for processes and data? • What is “metadata" and why do you need it? • What does a fully balanced DFD look like? • What value does a DFD fragment provide? SIGN UP for the full course today at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 168277 BA-EXPERTS
Prioritize Your User Stories, Features, Non-functional Requirements or Other Backlog Items
 
03:32
Watch the full-length video for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/requirements-prioritization-two-simple-techniques/ In this KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) you will learn two techniques to prioritize your user stories or IT requirements. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/. Prioritizing User Stories, or User Requirements Is Essential to Focusing Your Limited Resources on the Most Important Items First. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. How can you prioritize requirements based on business needs? 2. How can you apply the MoSCoW prioritization technique?
Views: 21886 BA-EXPERTS
User Stories: What, Not How (Part 2)
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/a-user-story-expresses-what-not-how/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eCourse "Writing Effective User Stories". View full course description and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/. Prefer reading? Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00E8IRUDK/. DESCRIPTION Rule 2 in How To Write Effective User Stories that Express Business Needs and Minimize Misunderstandings. When writing user stories, stakeholders knowledgeable about the role should focus on the business result that the IT solution will enable while leaving technology decisions up to the developers. What can you as the author do to make your life and your developers' lives easier? In a word, lots. In this KnowledgeKnugget™ you will learn how to write User Stories that express the what and avoid the how. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. How can you make sure that your user story expresses the what and not the how? 2. Why is it important that you distinguish between what and how? SIGN UP at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 39854 BA-EXPERTS
How to Identify Stakeholders for IT Projects
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/how-to-identify-stakeholders-it-projects/ In this KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) you will learn several different methods for identifying stakeholders to aid in your requirements gathering efforts. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/. DESCRIPTION: Stakeholder identification is a critical step is a critical step in your requirements gathering effort especially at the beginning of an IT project. Identifying the “right” stakeholders reduces scope creep and avoids missing requirements. Missing a single stakeholder might endanger the entire project. Discovering missed stakeholders late in the project is a major contributing factor to scope creep. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. How do you identify stakeholders early in the project? 2. How do you know when you are done? The eCourse and the ebook “Requirements Gathering Techniques” that this KK is a part of will be available soon. Check regularly at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/self-paced-business-analysis-courses-online/ or, for the readers, http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/business-analysis-ebooks/.
Views: 16694 BA-EXPERTS
Use a Question File to Reduce Uncertainty during Requirements Elicitation
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/question-file-it-projects/ In this KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) you will learn a business analysis technique simply called “the Question File”. This technique will help you manage open issues, document assumptions, be always prepared for requirements interviews, and help you identify stakeholders. Finally, if someone new comes on to the project, the Question File could just be invaluable as a tool for getting them up to speed quickly. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/ DESCRIPTION: Maintaining a Question File is the best approach for getting your head around a new project. By tracking what you do not know, adding what you do know, and capturing assumptions you make as your project progresses, you have a highly visible tool for documenting the current state of your project. The Question File provides a perfect uncertainty ratio that you can present to your manager to graphically communicate your progress toward requirements. In addition, it gives you a leg up in preparing requirements interviews and helps you avoid analysis paralysis making this simple technique a triple-header for business analysis. The Question File is one of the simplest forms of documentation for a project, but it just may be the most important document you create to avoid “analysis paralysis”. It starts life as a list with open questions about your project. This KnowledgeKnugget™ addresses questions like: 1. How do you deal with uncertainty at project initiation? 2. What value does tracking questions provide? The eCourse and the ebook “Requirements Gathering Techniques” that this KK is a part of will be available soon. Check regularly at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/self-paced-business-analysis-courses-online/ or, for the readers, http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/business-analysis-ebooks/. If you need help writing effective requirements take a look at our eCourse “Writing Better Requirements in Plain English ” http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-requirements/.
Views: 15553 BA-EXPERTS
Business Analysis and Waterfall Methodologies
 
02:12
Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/business-analyst-waterfall-methodologies/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eCourse "Business Analysis Defined". Take the full version at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00K7MM50O/. DESCRIPTION: Although the field of IT Business Analysis offers great career opportunities for those seeking employment, some business analysis skills are essential for any adult in the business world today. In this KnowledgeKnugget™ you will learn how Waterfall or Structured System Development approaches affect business analysis activities and requirements gathering efforts. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What are waterfall methodologies? 2. How does Waterfall change or influence your business analysis activities? ABOUT THE ECOURSE: The eCourse “Business Analysis Defined” describes how business analysis is currently practiced. The authors provide insight into this fast-growing field by distinguishing strategic, tactical, and operational business analysis. It provides surveys of what Business Analysts really do and what business analysis techniques people use most often when they are the one “wearing the BA hat”. You will learn what “requirements” really are and what different types of requirements exist. Because many requirements define future information technology (IT) solutions, the authors share their experience on how Waterfall, Iterative, Agile, and Experimental (aka “Chaotic”) Software Development methodologies impact the business analysis responsibility. Upon completion of this course, you can: • Identify and categorize best practices • Defend the need for good requirements • Classify four requirement types • Identify the critical skills required by business analysts • Describe the tools used • Relate the evolving role of today’s business analyst • Discuss how SDMs like Waterfall, Iterative, and Agile affect business analysis activities VIEW COURSE OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. To view even more requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/
Views: 13979 BA-EXPERTS
What is a Data Flow Diagram and Why Do You Need One?
 
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Lesson 1.3 of the eCourse “Data Flow Diagrams — Simply Put!” View the full course overview and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. Prefer reading? Also available as part of an eBook at https://www.amazon.com/Data-Flow-Diagramming-Example-Requirements-ebook/dp/B00VECCGLO/. DESCRIPTION (lesson 1.3) Use a Data Flow Diagram to represent the current workflow and easily recognize disconnects. Comparing an “as-is” DFD with a proposed “to-be” DFD facilitates Gap Analysis. You can create a DFD for many reasons but the main purpose is to have a visual representation of a business process or workflow. A Dataflow Diagram is an invaluable tool in discovering and eliciting functional requirements and can be used in a variety of process analysis techniques. ABOUT THE ECOURSE In this course you will learn process modeling techniques for Requirements Elicitation and Workflow Analysis. Understand and create Data Flow Diagrams (DFDs), Context-level DFDs, and Rigorous Physical Process Models (RPPM). Learn what they are, why they are important, and who can use them. Getting from someone’s explanations of how they do their job to usable and accurate workflow descriptions can be a daunting proposition. This course uses a concrete business scenario to present a simple, easy-to-learn approach for creating these diagrams from an interview with a Subject Matter Expert (SME). You will learn how to create a Rigorous Physical Process Model, evolve it to a Context-Level Data Flow Diagram, and explode the context-level process(es) and data to reveal the nitty-gritty detail (individual process specifications and detailed data specifications) that developers need. In the course, we will present the Who, the What, the When, the Where, the Why, and the How of creating pictures of business processes or workflows. If you are ever responsible for analyzing workflows to identify disconnects or discrepancies, data flow diagramming will help you tremendously. It is a fairly simple idea, it gives you a lot of information on how to look at business processes in a different way. In addition, you will learn the benefits of process visualization for the business community, for the one wearing the BA hat, for those tasked with developing the solution, and ultimately for the entire organization. You will also discover how powerful DFDs are as tools for recognizing and eliminating two of the major problems that haunt IT projects, namely Scope Creep and Project Overruns caused by late project change requests. This course answers the following questions: • What is a Data Flow Diagram (DFD)? • What is a Rigorous Physical Process Model? • What is a Context-Level DFD? • Why should I use Data Flow Diagrams? • What symbols can I use on each type of diagram? • How can I drill down into a process? • How can I show internal processes and flows that produce the results? • What does balancing a Data Flow Diagram mean and what is the business value? • What is the most efficient approach to balancing a DFD? • What business value do process specifications offer? • How can I express detailed specifications for processes and data? • What is “metadata" and why do you need it? • What does a fully balanced DFD look like? • What value does a DFD fragment provide? The course covers the following learning objectives: • Document existing business processes and workflows in Data Flow Diagrams (DFD) to initiate business process analysis • Defend the need for Data Flow Diagrams, Context Diagrams, and Rigorous Physical Process Models • Use the right symbols for each type of diagram to ensure a common interpretation by all parties • Explode a high level Data Flow Diagram to its lower level details to reveal underlying processes and procedures • Balance DFD’s to identify missing processes and reduce late project change requests • Use Horizontal Balancing to discover missing data and minimize redundancies • Document process specifications for functional primitives to guide the solution providers • Express metadata to reveal informational details that developers need to build the solution The authors of this course, Tom and Angela Hathaway, have authored numerous courses and delivered them to students around the world. Based on their experience, they feel very strongly that these techniques that they use in their business analysis endeavors should be available to anyone, anytime, anywhere on the planet. Sign up today at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. If you are tasked with defining the user requirements for an IT Solution, find more business analysis training in the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 5453 BA-EXPERTS
How to Get Started Drawing a Detailed Data Flow Diagram (DFD)
 
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Watch the full-length video for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/how-to-start-dataflow-diagram-dfd/ This KnowledgeKnugget is part of the 18 lecture eCourse “Data Flow Diagrams Simply Put!”.Take this self-paced course at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. Prefer reading? Try the book version at http://www.amazon.com/Data-Flow-Diagramming-Example-Requirements-ebook/dp/B00VECCGLO/ DESCRIPTION (lectures 7 - 9) Looking inside a complex process on a Data Flow Diagram can reveal hidden data and uncover potential problem areas. The first step toward ultimately exploding or levelling a process is to identify the internal processes that will become visible on a more detailed Data Flow Diagram. The problem is that a detailed DFD should never have more than 7 plus/minus 2 processes. How do you know which processes to represent? In lectures 7-9 you will learn how to identify the "RIGHT" Processes for a Data Flow Diagram (DFD). Lectures 7-9 answer questions like: • What does “exploding a process” mean? • What is the business value of doing it? • What processes will the lower level diagram contain? ABOUT THE ECOURSE This KK is part of an eCourse (VIEW FULL COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/). In this course you will learn the answers to these questions: • What is a Data Flow Diagram (DFD) and what does it do for you? • What is the difference between a Rigorous Physical Process Model and a Context-Level DFD? • What symbols can you use on each type of diagram? • What is the business value of exploding or levelling a DFD? • What is a simple approach for drilling down into a process? • How can you show the internal processes and flows that produce the results? • What does balancing a Data Flow Diagram mean and what is the business value? • What is the most efficient approach to balancing a DFD? • What business value do detailed process specifications offer? • How can you express detailed specifications for processes and data? • What is “metadata" and why do you need it? • What does a fully balanced DFD look like? • What value does a DFD fragment provide? To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 4395 BA-EXPERTS
Problem Analysis Uncovers Business Requirements (Part 2)
 
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atch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/problem-analysis-uncovers-business-requirements/ In this KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) you will learn how to use Problem Analysis to identify hidden business requirements. 70-80% of all IT projects are initiated because of problems. Working with a list of problems, you will learn how to distinguish real problems from symptoms and solutions. In addition, reducing your problem list to the core problems makes sure that all the factors and elements that hinder an organization from achieving its objectives may be understand and resolved at the root cause. This KnowledgeKnugget™ addresses questions like: 1. How can you do agile business problem analysis? 2. Why is problem analysis important to your project? The eCourse and the ebook “Requirements Gathering Techniques” that this KK is a part of will be available soon. Check regularly at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/self-paced-business-analysis-courses-online/ or, for the readers, http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/business-analysis-ebooks/. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/
Views: 5759 BA-EXPERTS
Business Problems Drive Business Requirements (Part 1)
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/business-problems-it-user-requirements/ In this KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) you will learn how to gather a list of potential business problems relative to your IT project that will help you discover business requirements. 70-80% of all IT projects are initiated because of problems. Effective Information Technology solutions start with business problem analysis, for which you first need a list of potential problems. This KnowledgeKnugget™ addresses questions like: 1. Why are business problems critical to the success of IT projects? 2. How can you collect a list of problems your project might solve? The eCourse and the ebook “Requirements Gathering Techniques” that this KK is a part of will be available soon. Check regularly at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/self-paced-business-analysis-courses-online/ or, for the readers, http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/business-analysis-ebooks/. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/
Views: 4158 BA-EXPERTS
Create a Context-Level DFD to Visualize Project Scope
 
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Watch the full-length video for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/how-to-draw-context-diagram-level-0-dataflow/ This KnowledgeKnugget is part of the 18 lecture eCourse “Data Flow Diagrams Simply Put!”. Take this self-paced course at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. Prefer reading? Try the book version at http://www.amazon.com/Data-Flow-Diagramming-Example-Requirements-ebook/dp/B00VECCGLO/. DESCRIPTION (lecture 6) Jump-Starting Context Diagrams, Data Flow Diagrams, Workflows, and Process Models by Visualizing Material and Data Movement within an Organization Converting a Rigorous Physical Process Model (RPPM) to a Context-Level Data Flow Diagram (DFD) is a simple but critical step in the early project discussion. An RPPM is a great first-cut diagram that focuses on organizational units and the exchange of material or data. Looking inside an organizational unit to see how they do what they do requires a more detailed perspective. The Context-Level Data Flow Diagram is a phenomenal picture of the scope of a project and sets the stage for drilling down individual processes to get the right requirements for your project. Lecture 6 answers questions like: 1. What is the difference between a Rigorous Physical Process Model and a Context-Level DFD? 2. How can I convert the RPPM to a legitimate DFD? 3. Why is this conversion necessary? ABOUT THE ECOURSE This KK is part of an eCourse (VIEW FULL COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/). In this course you will learn the answers to these questions: • What is a Data Flow Diagram (DFD) and what does it do for you? • What is the difference between a Rigorous Physical Process Model and a Context-Level DFD? • What symbols can you use on each type of diagram? • What is the business value of exploding or levelling a DFD? • What is a simple approach for drilling down into a process? • How can you show the internal processes and flows that produce the results? • What does balancing a Data Flow Diagram mean and what is the business value? • What is the most efficient approach to balancing a DFD? • What business value do detailed process specifications offer? • How can you express detailed specifications for processes and data? • What is “metadata" and why do you need it? • What does a fully balanced DFD look like? • What value does a DFD fragment provide? To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 3586 BA-EXPERTS
How to Avoid Ambiguity in User Stories (Part 4)
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/avoid-ambiguity-user-story/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eCourse "Writing Effective User Stories". View full course description and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/. Prefer reading? Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00E8IRUDK/. DESCRIPTION Rule 4 in How To Write Effective User Stories that Express Business Needs and Minimize Misunderstandings. In this KnowledgeKnugget™ you will learn how to identify and remove ambiguous and subjective terms and phrases in user stories and how to clarify assumptions by adding context. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. How can you ensure that your audience understands your user story as you intend it? 2. How does ambiguity affect the quality of the solution? SIGN UP at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-user-stories/. To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 16752 BA-EXPERTS
Business Analysis and Iterative Methodologies
 
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Watch the full-length version for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/business-analysis-iterative-methodologies/ This KnowledgeKnugget™ (KK) is part of an eCourse "Business Analysis Defined". Take the full version at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00K7MM50O/. DESCRIPTION: Although the field of IT Business Analysis offers great career opportunities for those seeking employment, some business analysis skills are essential for any adult in the business world today. In this KnowledgeKnugget™ you will learn how Iterative System Development approaches such as RUP affect business analysis activities and requirements gathering efforts. This KnowledgeKnugget™ answers questions like: 1. What is an Iterative Methodology? 2. How does an Iterative Methodology influence or change your business analysis activities? ABOUT THE ECOURSE: The eCourse “Business Analysis Defined” describes how business analysis is currently practiced. The authors provide insight into this fast-growing field by distinguishing strategic, tactical, and operational business analysis. It provides surveys of what Business Analysts really do and what business analysis techniques people use most often when they are the one “wearing the BA hat”. You will learn what “requirements” really are and what different types of requirements exist. Because many requirements define future information technology (IT) solutions, the authors share their experience on how Waterfall, Iterative, Agile, and Experimental (aka “Chaotic”) Software Development methodologies impact the business analysis responsibility. Upon completion of this course, you can: • Identify and categorize best practices • Defend the need for good requirements • Classify four requirement types • Identify the critical skills required by business analysts • Describe the tools used • Relate the evolving role of today’s business analyst • Discuss how SDMs like Waterfall, Iterative, and Agile affect business analysis activities VIEW COURSE OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. To view even more requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 9892 BA-EXPERTS
Part 1: Agile, Lean, DevOps, Kanban, ATD, BDD, Cynefin – the New World for Business Analysts
 
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Part 1 of “Strategic, Tactical, and Operational Business Analysis” presented to the IIBA® (International Institute of Business Analysis TM) Cincinnati Chapter and Bluegrass IIBA® Chapter on August 16 and 17, 2017. For FREE Business Analyst Training videos visit us at https://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/free-business-analysis-training/ PRESENTATION OVERVIEW (all parts) The purpose of business analysis is supposedly to define a future that will allow an organization to achieve specific goals and objectives. In reality, the purpose of business analysis can be anything from mindlessly scribbling down “requirements” to predicting the future of the known universe. Although often married to IT (Information Technology), business analysis is a fundamental business process regardless which organizational unit performs it. Because it defines the interface between people and technology, it is by nature complex. Based on experience gained in working with hundreds of organizations of various sizes world-wide, we identify distinct differences in business analysis as practiced at three levels. In a nutshell, Strategic Business Analysis identifies opportunities for improvement. Tactical Business Analysis flushes out the details of defined projects or initiatives. Operational Business Analysis deals with the evolving daily changes in the life of any change process. Defined thusly, these could be three different careers although they share a great deal of common techniques. As the business analyst, you need to be aware of the level at which you are working to morph the techniques for maximum returns. WHAT YOU WILL LEARN: 1. Define strategic, tactical, and operational business analysis audiences, actions, and results 2. Recognize how to leverage the distinction to further your business analysis career 3. Discuss what it means for the future of the business analysis profession TARGET AUDIENCE Project Business Analysts Enterprise Business Analysts Business Systems Analysts Requirements Engineers Business and Solution Architects Business Relationship Managers Project Managers Managers of Business Analysts IT Managers BACoE and PMO Directors PRESENTED BY: Tom Hathaway, Founder and Managing Member of BA-Experts Tom has over 30 years of experience as a practitioner and instructor in the information technology and business analysis fields. He has developed and presented business analysis training and consulting services to a world-wide audience of IT and business professionals. Working closely with his wife and business partner Angela, he created and maintains a business analysis blog and YouTube channel with nearly 1 million views and 12,000 subscribers. Together, they have recorded and published over 30 free “KnowledgeKnuggets™” explaining specific business analysis techniques for “Anyone Wearing the BA Hat”. In addition, they have written and published 7 Business Analysis books (available on Amazon.com) with related video courses (available on Udemy.com) and have more planned.
Views: 855 BA-EXPERTS
Create a Rigorous Physical Process Model as an Easy Start to a Data Flow Diagram
 
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Watch the full-length video for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/draw-rigorous-physical-process-model/ This Knowledge Knugget is part of an 18 lecture eCourse “Data Flow Diagrams Simply Put!”. Take this self-paced course at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. Prefer reading? Try the book version at http://www.amazon.com/Data-Flow-Diagramming-Example-Requirements-ebook/dp/B00VECCGLO/. DESCRIPTION (lectures 4 and 5) A Rigorous Physical Process Model is a simple, powerful tool for creating an easy-to-understand picture of how physical material and data flow through an organization. An excellent mode for presentations and analysis, they also represent a perfect entrée to the world of Data Flow Diagrams, Business Process Models, and Workflow Analysis. Lectures 4 and 5 answer questions like: 1. What is a Rigorous Physical Process Model and why do I need it? 2. What symbols does it use and what does each symbol represent? 3. How can I create a Rigorous Physical Process Model from interview notes? ABOUT THE ECOURSE This KK is part of an eCourse (VIEW FULL COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/). In this course you will learn the answers to these questions: • What is a Data Flow Diagram (DFD) and what does it do for you? • What is the difference between a Rigorous Physical Process Model and a Context-Level DFD? • What symbols can you use on each type of diagram? • What is the business value of exploding or levelling a DFD? • What is a simple approach for drilling down into a process? • How can you show the internal processes and flows that produce the results? • What does balancing a Data Flow Diagram mean and what is the business value? • What is the most efficient approach to balancing a DFD? • What business value do detailed process specifications offer? • How can you express detailed specifications for processes and data? • What is “metadata" and why do you need it? • What does a fully balanced DFD look like? • What value does a DFD fragment provide? To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 3353 BA-EXPERTS
Drawing a Detail Level Data Flow Diagram (Exploding or Leveling a DFD)
 
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Watch the full-length video for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/exploding-leveling-dataflow-diagram-dfd/ This KnowledgeKnugget is part of the 18 lecture eCourse “Data Flow Diagrams Simply Put!”. Take this self-paced course at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. Prefer reading? Try the book version at http://www.amazon.com/Data-Flow-Diagramming-Example-Requirements-ebook/dp/B00VECCGLO/ DESCRIPTION (lecture 10) Looking inside a complex process on a Data Flow Diagram (DFD) can reveal hidden data and uncover potential problem areas. Drilling down into a process also known as “exploding or levelling” a process on a Data Flow Diagram is a revealing exercise for the one wearing the BA hat AND for the subject matter experts that live the process. It is a critical technique for anyone who wants to analyze an existing situation, define the requirements for improvements, and understand the consequences of changing a process. This lecture introduces a simple, repeatable, step-by-step approach for drilling down into a process, explains why you should do it, how to get started, and how to draw the detailed Data Flow Diagram (DFD) with the internal processes, flows, and data stores. Lecture 10 answers questions like: • What does “exploding a process” mean? • What is the business value of doing it? • What processes will the lower level diagram contain? ABOUT THE ECOURSE This KK is part of an eCourse (VIEW FULL COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/). The course will answer the following questions: • What is a Data Flow Diagram (DFD) and what does it do for you? • What is the difference between a Rigorous Physical Process Model and a Context-Level DFD? • What symbols can you use on each type of diagram? • What is the business value of exploding or levelling a DFD? • What is a simple approach for drilling down into a process? • How can you show the internal processes and flows that produce the results? • What does balancing a Data Flow Diagram mean and what is the business value? • What is the most efficient approach to balancing a DFD? • What business value do detailed process specifications offer? • How can you express detailed specifications for processes and data? • What is “metadata" and why do you need it? • What does a fully balanced DFD look like? • What value does a DFD fragment provide?
Views: 4522 BA-EXPERTS
Business Processes, Data Flows, and Value Chains
 
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Lesson 1.2 of the eCourse “Data Flow Diagrams — Simply Put!” View the full course overview and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. Prefer reading? Also available as part of an eBook at https://www.amazon.com/Data-Flow-Diagramming-Example-Requirements-ebook/dp/B00VECCGLO/. DESCRIPTION (lesson 1.2) A Data Flow Diagram (DFD) is a phenomenal tool for presenting and analyzing business processes by studying how business data is created, consumed, stored, and transported. This lecture describes the purpose and use of business Data Flow Diagrams (DFDs). At the end of this lecture you will understand how DFDs are an excellent tool for identifying Stakeholder, Functional, and Data Requirements. ABOUT THE ECOURSE In this course you will learn process modeling techniques for Requirements Elicitation and Workflow Analysis. Understand and create Data Flow Diagrams (DFDs), Context-level DFDs, and Rigorous Physical Process Models (RPPM). Learn what they are, why they are important, and who can use them. Getting from someone’s explanations of how they do their job to usable and accurate workflow descriptions can be a daunting proposition. This course uses a concrete business scenario to present a simple, easy-to-learn approach for creating these diagrams from an interview with a Subject Matter Expert (SME). You will learn how to create a Rigorous Physical Process Model, evolve it to a Context-Level Data Flow Diagram, and explode the context-level process(es) and data to reveal the nitty-gritty detail (individual process specifications and detailed data specifications) that developers need. In the course, we will present the Who, the What, the When, the Where, the Why, and the How of creating pictures of business processes or workflows. If you are ever responsible for analyzing workflows to identify disconnects or discrepancies, data flow diagramming will help you tremendously. It is a fairly simple idea, it gives you a lot of information on how to look at business processes in a different way. In addition, you will learn the benefits of process visualization for the business community, for the one wearing the BA hat, for those tasked with developing the solution, and ultimately for the entire organization. You will also discover how powerful DFDs are as tools for recognizing and eliminating two of the major problems that haunt IT projects, namely Scope Creep and Project Overruns caused by late project change requests. This course answers the following questions: • What is a Data Flow Diagram (DFD)? • What is a Rigorous Physical Process Model? • What is a Context-Level DFD? • Why should I use Data Flow Diagrams? • What symbols can I use on each type of diagram? • How can I drill down into a process? • How can I show internal processes and flows that produce the results? • What does balancing a Data Flow Diagram mean and what is the business value? • What is the most efficient approach to balancing a DFD? • What business value do process specifications offer? • How can I express detailed specifications for processes and data? • What is “metadata" and why do you need it? • What does a fully balanced DFD look like? • What value does a DFD fragment provide? The course covers the following learning objectives: • Document existing business processes and workflows in Data Flow Diagrams (DFD) to initiate business process analysis • Defend the need for Data Flow Diagrams, Context Diagrams, and Rigorous Physical Process Models • Use the right symbols for each type of diagram to ensure a common interpretation by all parties • Explode a high level Data Flow Diagram to its lower level details to reveal underlying processes and procedures • Balance DFD’s to identify missing processes and reduce late project change requests • Use Horizontal Balancing to discover missing data and minimize redundancies • Document process specifications for functional primitives to guide the solution providers • Express metadata to reveal informational details that developers need to build the solution The authors of this course, Tom and Angela Hathaway, have authored numerous courses and delivered them to students around the world. Based on their experience, they feel very strongly that these techniques that they use in their business analysis endeavors should be available to anyone, anytime, anywhere on the planet. Sign up today at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. If you are tasked with defining the user requirements for an IT Solution, find more business analysis training in the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 1782 BA-EXPERTS
FAST TRACK to Building Business Analysis Skills
 
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At BA-EXPERTS http://businessanalysisexperts.com/, we believe that learning is a process, not a single event. That is why we developed FAST TRACK, a comprehensive business analysis skill-building program designed specifically around the 70-20-10 model of learning. We inform you (with courses, videos, and reading materials), we show you (with examples and case studies), and we support you (with feedback and guidance when you apply the skill in real life). As always, our products are not limited to the business analyst but are developed for “Anyone Wearing the Business Analysis Hat!”. If you don’t want an extensive skill building program, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/ to select individual business analysis training offers.
Views: 2358 BA-EXPERTS
What Exactly Is Requirements Elicitation
 
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Lesson 1.2 of the eCourse “Requirements Elicitation Interviews and Workshops – Simply Put! View the full course overview and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-elicitation-interviews-workshops/ Prefer reading? Try the book version at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ebook-requirements-elicitation-interviews-workshops/ DESCRIPTION (lesson 1.2) Instructor Tom Hathaway presents an introduction to requirements elicitation (aka requirements gathering, defining business requirements, gathering stakeholder requirements, etc.). He also defines the challenges that those tasked with getting the right requirements from the right people face in today’s world. Tom concludes the lesson with a look at the skill sets needed for today’s workforce. ABOUT THE ECOURSE This 90-minute course describes the concept of eliciting requirements and explains its necessity. It defines and contrasts 5 specific types of interviews for helping subject matter experts discover their requirements. Since interviewing is not an intuitive skill, we also present a wide range of interviewing techniques and define the characteristics of a good requirements interviewer. To guide you through the intricacies of conducting group interviews, we dedicate an entire section to facilitating Requirements Gathering Workshops (JAD, RDW, User Story Workshops, etc.), a powerful requirements definition technique for cross-functional groups on traditional and Agile software development methodologies. Upon completion of the entire course, you can: • Define and distinguish five specific requirements elicitation approaches from one-on-one Requirements Interviews to Requirements Gathering Workshops • Evaluate the pros and cons of each approach for your organization and project • Prepare, perform, and manage effective requirements gathering interviews and workshops • Use informational and active listening to discover hidden requirements during interviews and workshops • Recognize the specific challenges and strengths of facilitated requirements workshops involving cross-functional groups of stakeholders • Improve your interviewing skills by analyzing the best-practice attitudes and characteristics of effective interviewers SIGN UP for the full course today at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-elicitation-interviews-workshops/ To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 9280 BA-EXPERTS
Part 2: Business Analysis Techniques Used by the Strategic Business Analyst
 
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Part 2 of “Strategic, Tactical, and Operational Business Analysis” presented to the IIBA® (International Institute of Business Analysis TM) Cincinnati Chapter and Bluegrass IIBA® Chapter on August 16 and 17, 2017 For FREE Business Analyst Training videos visit us at https://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/free-business-analysis-training/ PRESENTATION OVERVIEW (all parts) The purpose of business analysis is supposedly to define a future that will allow an organization to achieve specific goals and objectives. In reality, the purpose of business analysis can be anything from mindlessly scribbling down “requirements” to predicting the future of the known universe. Although often married to IT (Information Technology), business analysis is a fundamental business process regardless which organizational unit performs it. Because it defines the interface between people and technology, it is by nature complex. Based on experience gained in working with hundreds of organizations of various sizes world-wide, we identify distinct differences in business analysis as practiced at three levels. In a nutshell, Strategic Business Analysis identifies opportunities for improvement. Tactical Business Analysis flushes out the details of defined projects or initiatives. Operational Business Analysis deals with the evolving daily changes in the life of any change process. Defined thusly, these could be three different careers although they share a great deal of common techniques. As the business analyst, you need to be aware of the level at which you are working to morph the techniques for maximum returns. WHAT YOU WILL LEARN: 1. Define strategic, tactical, and operational business analysis audiences, actions, and results 2. Recognize how to leverage the distinction to further your business analysis career 3. Discuss what it means for the future of the business analysis profession TARGET AUDIENCE Project Business Analysts Enterprise Business Analysts Business Systems Analysts Requirements Engineers Business and Solution Architects Business Relationship Managers Project Managers Managers of Business Analysts IT Managers BACoE and PMO Directors PRESENTED BY: Tom Hathaway, Founder and Managing Member of BA-Experts Tom has over 30 years of experience as a practitioner and instructor in the information technology and business analysis fields. He has developed and presented business analysis training and consulting services to a world-wide audience of IT and business professionals. Working closely with his wife and business partner Angela, he created and maintains a business analysis blog and YouTube channel with nearly 1 million views and 12,000 subscribers. Together, they have recorded and published over 30 free “KnowledgeKnuggets™” explaining specific business analysis techniques for “Anyone Wearing the BA Hat”. In addition, they have written and published 7 Business Analysis books (available on Amazon.com) with related video courses (available on Udemy.com) and have more planned.
Views: 1594 BA-EXPERTS
Introduction to Requirements Elicitation Techniques
 
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Lesson 1.1 of the eCourse “Requirements Elicitation Techniques – Simply Put!" View the full course overview and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-requirements-elicitation-techniques/ Prefer reading? Try the book version at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/book-requirements-elicitation-techniques/ DESCRIPTION (lesson 1.1) In this video, author and instructor Tom Hathaway introduces the learning objectives for the course "Requirements Elicitation Techniques — Simply Put!'. He explains why Requirements Elicitation is such a challenge and how we can manage it. ABOUT THE ECOURSE This 90-minute course teaches you several requirements elicitation techniques designed to improve the outcomes of your elicitation interviews and workshops. The presented techniques will help practicing business analysts, future business analysts, subject matter experts, managers, product owners, project managers, and anyone responsible for getting the right requirements from the right people. Upon completion of the entire course, you can: • Identify potential stakeholders early in the project • Manage the requirements elicitation process with a Question File • Recognize, track, and report progress toward requirements completion • Define, document, and analyze business problems to ferret out hidden requirements • Facilitate effective requirements brainstorming sessions to uncover additional requirements • Use 10 critical questions to initiate the requirements elicitation process • Capture and communicate assumptions about your requirements • Avoid “analysis paralysis” by recognizing when it is time to stop eliciting and start deciding SIGN UP for the full course today at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-requirements-elicitation-techniques/ To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 1913 BA-EXPERTS
How To Write Data and Process Specifications
 
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Watch the full-length video for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/how-to-write-process-specifications/ This KnowledgeKnugget is part of the 18 lecture eCourse “Data Flow Diagrams Simply Put!”. Take this self-paced course at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. Prefer reading? Try the ebook version at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/dataflow-diagramming-example/ . DESCRIPTION (lectures 13 - 14) This lecture builds on the previous lectures and assumes that you have a detailed Data Flow Diagram (DFD) and need to write process specifications for one or more processes. You will learn techniques for writing detailed process specifications. In the second part of the lecture this course teaches how to create data specifications that the solution providers / developers need to develop your IT solution. Lectures 13 - 14 answer questions like: 1. What business value do detailed process specifications offer? 2. How can I express detailed specifications for processes and data? 3. What is “metadata” and why do you need it? … ABOUT THE ECOURSE This KK is part of an eCourse (view course description and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/). In this course you will learn the answers to these questions: • What is a Data Flow Diagram (DFD) and what does it do for you? • What is the difference between a Rigorous Physical Process Model and a Context-Level DFD? • What symbols can you use on each type of diagram? • What is the business value of exploding or levelling a DFD? • What is a simple approach for drilling down into a process? • How can you show the internal processes and flows that produce the results? • What does balancing a Data Flow Diagram mean and what is the business value? • What is the most efficient approach to balancing a DFD? • What business value do detailed process specifications offer? • How can you express detailed specifications for processes and data? • What is “metadata" and why do you need it? • What does a fully balanced DFD look like? • What value does a DFD fragment provide? To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/
Views: 2965 BA-EXPERTS
Using Cynefin to Prioritize and Analyze Features, User Stories, and Functional Requirements
 
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Lesson 5 of “Getting and Writing IT Requirements in a Lean and Agile World”. View the full course description and outline at Udemy (https://goo.gl/CZ5hMF). COURSE DESCRIPTION: Meeting the Agile, Lean, and Continuous Delivery Challenge Problem solvers are in demand in every organization, large and small, from a Mom and Pop shop to the federal government. Increase your value to yourself and to your group or organization by improving your ability to extract, express, and analyze business needs in formats that are supported by Agile, Lean, and DevOps philosophies. The single largest challenge facing organizations around the world is how to leverage their Information Technology to gain competitive advantage. This is not about how to program the devices, it is determining what the devices should do. The skills required to identify and define the best IT solutions are invaluable for every role in the organization. These skills can propel you from the mail room to the boardroom by making your organization more effective and more profitable. An Agile Approach for Getting from Visions and Requirements to Test Scenarios In this course, you will learn how the concepts of Agile, Lean, and Continuous Delivery software development philosophies influence the discovery, expression, and analysis of business needs. You will learn how to express those needs in user story format, as features or requirement statements, and ultimately as Given-When-Then structures. This is the language that allows developers to deliver the IT solutions the organization needs. This exercise-rich, interactive requirements discovery workshop provides a proven set of core business analysis techniques, methods and tricks. The presented content will help agile and lean software development teams, business analysts, product owners, test developers, and subject matter experts discover, capture, clarify, and confirm the kind of IT requirements that solution providers need to deliver the right information technology solutions for the business. Upon completion of the entire course, you can: 1. Define the capabilities and challenges of Lean and Agile software development philosophies 2. Adapt 10 different requirements gathering (elicitation) techniques to Lean, Agile, and Continuous Delivery software development environments 3. Support Lean or Agile teams by expressing business needs and wants in formats that optimally support all modern Software Development Methodologies (SDM) 4. Reduce the time wasted on miscommunication between stakeholders of IT projects by recognizing and removing terms and phrases that can be easily misinterpreted 5. Drill-down into requirements, features, user stories, and functions to identify and express test scenarios in Given-When-Then statements to facilitate automated testing 6. Identify 17 types of Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) and develop Given-When-Then (GWT) test scenarios for them 7. Leverage the learning curve to incorporate the presented techniques into your job SIGN UP for the full course today at Udemy (https://goo.gl/CZ5hMF). To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 846 BA-EXPERTS
The Value of Solution Requirements
 
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Lesson 1.2 of the eCourse “Exposing Functional AND Non-Functional Requirements” View the full course overview and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-exposing-functional-and-non-functional-requirements/. Prefer reading? Also available as part of an eBook at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/eworkbook-how-to-write-effective-requirements/. DESCRIPTION (lesson 1.2) Solution requirements represent a level of detail developers need (independent of software development methodology) to deliver software applications that meet the business needs. In this section, Co-author and presenter Tom Hathaway defines solution requirements for IT projects in both their functional and non-functional flavors. ABOUT THE ECOURSE Business and Stakeholder Requirements define the business need in business terminology that all involved parties can understand, but the devil lies in the detail. Solution Providers (i.e., those responsible for building, buying, assembling, or configuring an IT application) need to know what the application has to do, what data it will deal with, and what qualities it has to possess to meet the business needs. In other words, they need Functional and Non-functional (aka Solution) Requirements at a level of detail that most subject matter experts can only provide when prompted and led. A functional requirement specifies something the system should do. Non-functional requirements describe the system’s quality characteristics or quality attributes. This course, “Exposing Functional AND Non-Functional Requirements”, offers a tried-and-true approach for analyzing and decomposing any set of requirements expressed in simple sentences. The outcome is a list of functions with related data, and associated non-functional attributes (such as availability, reliability, maintainability, etc.) of both. Applying the presented techniques will significantly improve the communication between those tasked with defining the need (aka “the one wearing the Business Analysis Hat”) and Solution Providers, thereby reducing the risk of misunderstandings. To enhance the learning process, the eCourse includes several exercises in each section and provides expert feedback for each exercise. Upon completion of this course, you can: • Decompose well-structured requirement statements to identify Functional and Non-Functional Requirements • Give those responsible for designing, building, and/or buying the solution the kind of information they need to make the decisions that are right for the business • Identify Informational, Performance, and Constraining Requirements from a list of Functional Requirements • Document and manage Business, Stakeholder, Functional and Non-Functional Requirements • Capture and clarify Business Rules and External Constraints that mandate limits to the delivered solution • Develop measurable Solution Requirements that facilitate End-User Acceptance Testing VIEW THE FULL COURSE OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-exposing-functional-and-non-functional-requirements/ To view even more requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 753 BA-EXPERTS
Acceptance Test Driven Development (ATDD) and BDD for the Business Analyst
 
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Lesson 27 of “Getting and Writing IT Requirements in a Lean and Agile World”. View the full course description and outline at Udemy (https://goo.gl/CZ5hMF). COURSE DESCRIPTION: Meeting the Agile, Lean, and Continuous Delivery Challenge Problem solvers are in demand in every organization, large and small, from a Mom and Pop shop to the federal government. Increase your value to yourself and to your group or organization by improving your ability to extract, express, and analyze business needs in formats that are supported by Agile, Lean, and DevOps philosophies. The single largest challenge facing organizations around the world is how to leverage their Information Technology to gain competitive advantage. This is not about how to program the devices, it is determining what the devices should do. The skills required to identify and define the best IT solutions are invaluable for every role in the organization. These skills can propel you from the mail room to the boardroom by making your organization more effective and more profitable. An Agile Approach for Getting from Visions and Requirements to Test Scenarios In this course, you will learn how the concepts of Agile, Lean, and Continuous Delivery software development philosophies influence the discovery, expression, and analysis of business needs. You will learn how to express those needs in user story format, as features or requirement statements, and ultimately as Given-When-Then structures. This is the language that allows developers to deliver the IT solutions the organization needs. This exercise-rich, interactive requirements discovery workshop provides a proven set of core business analysis techniques, methods and tricks. The presented content will help agile and lean software development teams, business analysts, product owners, test developers, and subject matter experts discover, capture, clarify, and confirm the kind of IT requirements that solution providers need to deliver the right information technology solutions for the business. Upon completion of the entire course, you can: 1. Define the capabilities and challenges of Lean and Agile software development philosophies 2. Adapt 10 different requirements gathering (elicitation) techniques to Lean, Agile, and Continuous Delivery software development environments 3. Support Lean or Agile teams by expressing business needs and wants in formats that optimally support all modern Software Development Methodologies (SDM) 4. Reduce the time wasted on miscommunication between stakeholders of IT projects by recognizing and removing terms and phrases that can be easily misinterpreted 5. Drill-down into requirements, features, user stories, and functions to identify and express test scenarios in Given-When-Then statements to facilitate automated testing 6. Identify 17 types of Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) and develop Given-When-Then (GWT) test scenarios for them 7. Leverage the learning curve to incorporate the presented techniques into your job SIGN UP for the full course today at Udemy (https://goo.gl/CZ5hMF). To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 713 BA-EXPERTS
Business Rules, Business Policies, and External Constraints
 
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Lesson 3.5 of the eCourse “Exposing Functional AND Non-Functional Requirements” View the full course overview and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-exposing-functional-and-non-functional-requirements/. Prefer reading? Also available as part of an eBook at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/eworkbook-how-to-write-effective-requirements/. DESCRIPTION (lesson 3.5) Constraints express absolute limits that any solution has to meet or it will fail. In this section, co-author and presenter Tom Hathaway defines, contrasts, and presents examples of both internal and external constraints. Internal constraints are often expressed in the form of business policies or business rules whereas external constraints are imposed by the physical or regulatory environment. ABOUT THE ECOURSE Business and Stakeholder Requirements define the business need in business terminology that all involved parties can understand, but the devil lies in the detail. Solution Providers (i.e., those responsible for building, buying, assembling, or configuring an IT application) need to know what the application has to do, what data it will deal with, and what qualities it has to possess to meet the business needs. In other words, they need Functional and Non-functional (aka Solution) Requirements at a level of detail that most subject matter experts can only provide when prompted and led. A functional requirement specifies something the system should do. Non-functional requirements describe the system’s quality characteristics or quality attributes. This course, “Exposing Functional AND Non-Functional Requirements”, offers a tried-and-true approach for analyzing and decomposing any set of requirements expressed in simple sentences. The outcome is a list of functions with related data, and associated non-functional attributes (such as availability, reliability, maintainability, etc.) of both. Applying the presented techniques will significantly improve the communication between those tasked with defining the need (aka “the one wearing the Business Analysis Hat”) and Solution Providers, thereby reducing the risk of misunderstandings. To enhance the learning process, the eCourse includes several exercises in each section and provides expert feedback for each exercise. Upon completion of this course, you can: • Decompose well-structured requirement statements to identify Functional and Non-Functional Requirements • Give those responsible for designing, building, and/or buying the solution the kind of information they need to make the decisions that are right for the business • Identify Informational, Performance, and Constraining Requirements from a list of Functional Requirements • Document and manage Business, Stakeholder, Functional and Non-Functional Requirements • Capture and clarify Business Rules and External Constraints that mandate limits to the delivered solution • Develop measurable Solution Requirements that facilitate End-User Acceptance Testing VIEW THE FULL COURSE OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-exposing-functional-and-non-functional-requirements/ To view even more requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 2798 BA-EXPERTS
Business Analysis Defined
 
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Take the full version of the self-paced eCourse “Business Analysis Defined” at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. Also available as Paperback or Kindle eBook at http://www.amazon.com/Business-Analysis-Defined-Waterfall-techniques-ebook/dp/B00K7MM50O/. DESCRIPTION: This eCourse is an introduction to the field of business analysis. It defines how business analysis is currently practiced and what "requirements” really are. It also explains how different software development methodologies (Agile, Structured or Waterfall, Iterative) impact business analysis activities. In addition, the eCourse/book describes what business analysis techniques are widely used by business analysts (or anyone wearing the business analysis hat). In today’s world, every organization does some form of business analysis whether they use the term or not. For many (especially larger organizations), it is an extremely structured, managed process while others thrive on change and only do business analysis when and as needed. The perception that business analysis is only needed to develop IT solutions is not entirely accurate. Actually, it is a critical component of any change initiative within an organization whether software is involved or not. “Business Analysis Defined” provides insight into this fast-growing field by distinguishing strategic, tactical, and operational business analysis. It is based in part on surveys of what BAs really do and what business analysis techniques people use most often when they are the one “wearing the BA hat”. Because of the tight relationship between requirements and information technology, the authors also share their experience on how software development methodologies impact the business analysis responsibility. Upon completion of this course, you can: • Identify and categorize best practices • Defend the need for good requirements • Classify four requirement types • Identify the critical skills required by business analysts • Describe the tools used • Relate the evolving role of today’s business analyst • Discuss how SDMs like Waterfall, Iterative, and Agile affect business analysis activities VIEW COURSE OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-business-analysis-defined/. If you are tasked with defining the user requirements for an IT Solution, find more business analysis eCourses at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/self-paced-business-analysis-courses-online/ To view even more requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/
Views: 420 BA-EXPERTS
How DFDs Combat Scope Creep and Mitigate Project Risks
 
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Watch the full-length video for FREE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/dfd-scope-creep-project-risk/ This KnowledgeKnugget is part of the 18 lectures eCourse “Data Flow Diagrams Simply Put!”. Take this self-paced online course at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. Prefer reading? Try the ebook version at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/dataflow-diagramming-example/ . ABOUT THIS VIDEO: Project resources are limited and the one wearing the BA hat has to decide how to get the best requirements in the allotted time. Understanding how people use existing technology to do their job is a critical prerequisite to defining changes. This KnowledgeKnugget™ explains why drawing and using a Data Flow Diagram (DFD) might be the best decision you can make. In this 9 minute KnowledgeKnugget™, recognized business analysis expert, Tom Hathaway, summarizes the results of the 18 lecture eCourse “Data Flow Diagrams Simply Put!” If you are responsible for eliciting the requirements for an IT application or for improving manual procedures, the Data Flow Diagram might just be your best ally. It helps you and the business community visualize the process, current problems, and potential solutions. This KnowledgeKnugget™ addresses questions like: 1. Why should I draw a Data Flow Diagram? 2. What does a fully balanced DFD look like? 3. What value does a DFD fragment provide? This KK is part of an eCourse. If you take the full course (view description and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/) you will learn the answers to these questions: • What is a Data Flow Diagram (DFD) and what does it do for you? • What is the difference between a Rigorous Physical Process Model and a Context-Level DFD? • What symbols can you use on each type of diagram? • What is the business value of exploding or levelling a DFD? • What is a simple approach for drilling down into a process? • How can you show the internal processes and flows that produce the results? • What does balancing a Data Flow Diagram mean and what is the business value? • What is the most efficient approach to balancing a DFD? • What business value do detailed process specifications offer? • How can you express detailed specifications for processes and data? • What is “metadata" and why do you need it? • What does a fully balanced DFD look like? • What value does a DFD fragment provide? If you are tasked with defining the user requirements for an IT Solution, find more business analysis training in the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/
Views: 1777 BA-EXPERTS
Data Flow Diagrams - Simply Put!
 
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Take the full version of the self-paced eCourse “Data Flow Diagrams Simply Put!” http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. Prefer reading? Try the book version at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/dataflow-diagramming-example/ . DESCRIPTION Learn about Data Flow Diagrams (DFDs), Context-level DFDs, and Rigorous Physical Process Models (RPPM), what they are, why they are important, and who can use them. Getting from someone’s explanations of how they do their job to usable and accurate workflow descriptions can be a daunting proposition. This course uses a concrete business scenario to present a simple, easy-to-learn approach for creating these diagrams from an interview with a Subject Matter Expert (SME). You will learn how to create a Rigorous Physical Process Model, evolve it to a Context-Level Data Flow Diagram, and explode the context-level process(es) and data to reveal the nitty-gritty detail (individual process specifications and detailed data specifications) that developers need. In the course, we will present the Who, the What, the When, the Where, the Why, and the How of creating pictures of business processes or workflows. If you are ever responsible for analyzing workflows to identify disconnects or discrepancies, data flow diagramming will help you tremendously. It is a fairly simple idea, it gives you a lot of information on how to look at business processes in a different way. In addition, you will learn the benefits of process visualization for the business community, for the one wearing the BA hat, for those tasked with developing the solution, and ultimately for the entire organization. You will also discover how powerful DFDs are as tools for recognizing and eliminating two of the major problems that haunt IT projects, namely Scope Creep and Project Overruns caused by late project change requests. This course answers the following questions: • What is a Data Flow Diagram (DFD)? • What is a Rigorous Physical Process Model? • What is a Context-Level DFD? • Why should I use Data Flow Diagrams? • What symbols can I use on each type of diagram? • How can I drill down into a process? • How can I show internal processes and flows that produce the results? • What does balancing a Data Flow Diagram mean and what is the business value? • What is the most efficient approach to balancing a DFD? • What business value do process specifications offer? • How can I express detailed specifications for processes and data? • What is “metadata" and why do you need it? • What does a fully balanced DFD look like? • What value does a DFD fragment provide? The authors of this course, Tom and Angela Hathaway, have authored numerous courses and delivered them to students around the world. Based on their experience, they feel very strongly that these techniques that they use in their business analysis endeavors should be available to anyone, anytime, anywhere on the planet. COURSE OUTLINE AND OBJECTIVES: http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-data-flow-diagrams-context-model/. If you are tasked with defining the user requirements for an IT Solution, find more business analysis training in the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 725 BA-EXPERTS
BA EXPERTS: Requirements ARE Our Business!
 
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Check out http://businessanalysisexperts.com/. BA-EXPERTS offer Business Analysis Training for “Anyone Wearing the Business Analysis Hat!”. We provide a blended training curriculum for building business analysis skills. Everyone has a preferred learning style and we deliver business analysis training that fits each style and each wallet. For the corporation or government agency, we offer business analysis classroom training onsite and online (http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/business-analysis-classroom-training/). For individuals, we have eCourses, eBooks, and KnowledgeKnuggets™. Visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/. If you are tasked with defining the user requirements for an IT Solution, find more business analysis eCourses at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/self-paced-business-analysis-courses-online/
Views: 1685 BA-EXPERTS
What Are Test Scenarios, Test Cases, and Test Outlines Using the Given-When-Then Format (Gherkin)
 
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Lesson 28 of “Getting and Writing IT Requirements in a Lean and Agile World”. View the full course description and outline at Udemy (https://goo.gl/CZ5hMF). COURSE DESCRIPTION: Meeting the Agile, Lean, and Continuous Delivery Challenge Problem solvers are in demand in every organization, large and small, from a Mom and Pop shop to the federal government. Increase your value to yourself and to your group or organization by improving your ability to extract, express, and analyze business needs in formats that are supported by Agile, Lean, and DevOps philosophies. The single largest challenge facing organizations around the world is how to leverage their Information Technology to gain competitive advantage. This is not about how to program the devices, it is determining what the devices should do. The skills required to identify and define the best IT solutions are invaluable for every role in the organization. These skills can propel you from the mail room to the boardroom by making your organization more effective and more profitable. An Agile Approach for Getting from Visions and Requirements to Test Scenarios In this course, you will learn how the concepts of Agile, Lean, and Continuous Delivery software development philosophies influence the discovery, expression, and analysis of business needs. You will learn how to express those needs in user story format, as features or requirement statements, and ultimately as Given-When-Then structures. This is the language that allows developers to deliver the IT solutions the organization needs. This exercise-rich, interactive requirements discovery workshop provides a proven set of core business analysis techniques, methods and tricks. The presented content will help agile and lean software development teams, business analysts, product owners, test developers, and subject matter experts discover, capture, clarify, and confirm the kind of IT requirements that solution providers need to deliver the right information technology solutions for the business. Upon completion of the entire course, you can: 1. Define the capabilities and challenges of Lean and Agile software development philosophies 2. Adapt 10 different requirements gathering (elicitation) techniques to Lean, Agile, and Continuous Delivery software development environments 3. Support Lean or Agile teams by expressing business needs and wants in formats that optimally support all modern Software Development Methodologies (SDM) 4. Reduce the time wasted on miscommunication between stakeholders of IT projects by recognizing and removing terms and phrases that can be easily misinterpreted 5. Drill-down into requirements, features, user stories, and functions to identify and express test scenarios in Given-When-Then statements to facilitate automated testing 6. Identify 17 types of Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) and develop Given-When-Then (GWT) test scenarios for them 7. Leverage the learning curve to incorporate the presented techniques into your job SIGN UP for the full course today at Udemy (https://goo.gl/CZ5hMF). To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 649 BA-EXPERTS
PREVIEW eCourse/eBook: How to Write Effective Requirements for IT Solutions
 
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Overview of the UDEMY course “Writing Requirements for IT — Simply Put! Use Four Simple Rules to Improve the Quality of Your User Stories, Features, or IT Requirements”. View the full course description and outline at https://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-requirements/. Prefer reading? Also available as a book at https://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/eworkbook-how-to-write-effective-requirements/. DESCRIPTION: Effective Requirements Reduce Project Failures Writing requirements is one of the core competencies for anyone in an organization responsible for defining future Information Technology (IT) applications. However, nearly every independently executed root-cause analysis of IT project problems and failures in the past half-century have identified "misunderstood or incomplete requirements" as the primary cause. This has made writing requirements the bane of many projects. The real problem is the subtle differences between "understanding" someone else’s requirement and "sharing a common understanding" with the author. "Writing Requirements for IT — Simply Put!" gives you a set of 4 simple rules that will make your requirement statements more easily understood by all target audiences. The focus is to increase the "common understanding" between the author of a requirement and the solution providers (e.g., in-house or outsourced IT designers, developers, analysts, and vendors). The rules we present in this book will reduce the failure rate of projects suffering from poor requirements. Regardless of your job title or role, if you are tasked with communicating your future needs to others, this course is for you. How to Get the Most Out of this Course? To maximize the learning effect, you will have optional, online exercises to assess your understanding of each presented technique. Lessons prefaced with the phrase “Exercise” contain an exercise that we have prepared to give you an opportunity to try the presented technique yourself. These exercises are optional and they do not “test” your knowledge in the conventional sense. Their purpose is to demonstrate the use of the technique more real-life than our explanations can supply. We hope you enjoy them and that they make it easier for you to apply the techniques in real life. What you will learn when you enroll in the full course: - Find missing requirements by analyzing the business and IT components of a proposed solution - Reduce the number of invalid assumptions by using a question file - Translate business needs into well-formed business requirement statements - Write business requirements that express WHAT the solution should deliver - Confirm that your requirements are in scope for your project - Defend the need for expressing requirements that all affected target audiences understand - Isolate and address ambiguous words and phrases in requirements - Use our Peer Perception technique to find words and phrases that can lead to misunderstandings - Improve your requirements with revision, definition, and clarification techniques - Use corporate and industry standard terms to improve communication - Define ambiguous terms and expand acronyms in a glossary to avoid miscommunication - Reduce the ambiguity of a statement by adding context - Utilize standard readability indices to reduce the potential for misunderstandings on your projects - Decompose requirement statements to identify Functional and Non-Functional Requirements - Give those responsible for designing, building, and/or buying the solution the kind of information they need to make the decisions that are right for the business - Identify Informational, Performance, and Constraining Requirements from a list of Functional Requirements - Document and manage Business, Stakeholder, Functional and Non-Functional Requirements in XL - Capture Business Rules and External Constraints that mandate limits to the delivered solution - Develop Measurable Solution Requirements that Facilitate End-User Acceptance Testing
Views: 17147 BA-EXPERTS
Part 4: Business Analysis Techniques Used by the Operational Business Analyst
 
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Part 4 of “Strategic, Tactical, and Operational Business Analysis” presented to the IIBA® (International Institute of Business Analysis TM) Cincinnati Chapter and Bluegrass IIBA® Chapter on August 16 and 17, 2017 For FREE Business Analyst Training videos visit us at https://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/free-business-analysis-training/ PRESENTATION OVERVIEW (all parts) The purpose of business analysis is supposedly to define a future that will allow an organization to achieve specific goals and objectives. In reality, the purpose of business analysis can be anything from mindlessly scribbling down “requirements” to predicting the future of the known universe. Although often married to IT (Information Technology), business analysis is a fundamental business process regardless which organizational unit performs it. Because it defines the interface between people and technology, it is by nature complex. Based on experience gained in working with hundreds of organizations of various sizes world-wide, we identify distinct differences in business analysis as practiced at three levels. In a nutshell, Strategic Business Analysis identifies opportunities for improvement. Tactical Business Analysis flushes out the details of defined projects or initiatives. Operational Business Analysis deals with the evolving daily changes in the life of any change process. Defined thusly, these could be three different careers although they share a great deal of common techniques. As the business analyst, you need to be aware of the level at which you are working to morph the techniques for maximum returns. WHAT YOU WILL LEARN: 1. Define strategic, tactical, and operational business analysis audiences, actions, and results 2. Recognize how to leverage the distinction to further your business analysis career 3. Discuss what it means for the future of the business analysis profession TARGET AUDIENCE Project Business Analysts Enterprise Business Analysts Business Systems Analysts Requirements Engineers Business and Solution Architects Business Relationship Managers Project Managers Managers of Business Analysts IT Managers BACoE and PMO Directors PRESENTED BY: Tom Hathaway, Founder and Managing Member of BA-Experts Tom has over 30 years of experience as a practitioner and instructor in the information technology and business analysis fields. He has developed and presented business analysis training and consulting services to a world-wide audience of IT and business professionals. Working closely with his wife and business partner Angela, he created and maintains a business analysis blog and YouTube channel with nearly 1 million views and 12,000 subscribers. Together, they have recorded and published over 30 free “KnowledgeKnuggets™” explaining specific business analysis techniques for “Anyone Wearing the BA Hat”. In addition, they have written and published 7 Business Analysis books (available on Amazon.com) with related video courses (available on Udemy.com) and have more planned.
Views: 510 BA-EXPERTS
Part 6: The Now and Future Business Analyst Profession
 
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Part 6 of “Strategic, Tactical, and Operational Business Analysis” presented to the IIBA® (International Institute of Business Analysis TM) Cincinnati Chapter and Bluegrass IIBA® Chapter on August 16 and 17, 2017 For FREE Business Analyst Training videos visit us at https://businessanalysisexperts.com/product-category/free-business-analysis-training/ PRESENTATION OVERVIEW (all parts) The purpose of business analysis is supposedly to define a future that will allow an organization to achieve specific goals and objectives. In reality, the purpose of business analysis can be anything from mindlessly scribbling down “requirements” to predicting the future of the known universe. Although often married to IT (Information Technology), business analysis is a fundamental business process regardless which organizational unit performs it. Because it defines the interface between people and technology, it is by nature complex. Based on experience gained in working with hundreds of organizations of various sizes world-wide, we identify distinct differences in business analysis as practiced at three levels. In a nutshell, Strategic Business Analysis identifies opportunities for improvement. Tactical Business Analysis flushes out the details of defined projects or initiatives. Operational Business Analysis deals with the evolving daily changes in the life of any change process. Defined thusly, these could be three different careers although they share a great deal of common techniques. As the business analyst, you need to be aware of the level at which you are working to morph the techniques for maximum returns. WHAT YOU WILL LEARN: 1. Define strategic, tactical, and operational business analysis audiences, actions, and results 2. Recognize how to leverage the distinction to further your business analysis career 3. Discuss what it means for the future of the business analysis profession TARGET AUDIENCE Project Business Analysts Enterprise Business Analysts Business Systems Analysts Requirements Engineers Business and Solution Architects Business Relationship Managers Project Managers Managers of Business Analysts IT Managers BACoE and PMO Directors PRESENTED BY: Tom Hathaway, Founder and Managing Member of BA-Experts Tom has over 30 years of experience as a practitioner and instructor in the information technology and business analysis fields. He has developed and presented business analysis training and consulting services to a world-wide audience of IT and business professionals. Working closely with his wife and business partner Angela, he created and maintains a business analysis blog and YouTube channel with nearly 1 million views and 12,000 subscribers. Together, they have recorded and published over 30 free “KnowledgeKnuggets™” explaining specific business analysis techniques for “Anyone Wearing the BA Hat”. In addition, they have written and published 7 Business Analysis books (available on Amazon.com) with related video courses (available on Udemy.com) and have more planned.
Views: 488 BA-EXPERTS
eCourse/eBook Overview: Writing Effective User Stories
 
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This is an old version of the video https://youtu.be/rHwL3iBpiG8
Views: 768 BA-EXPERTS
Requirements Elicitation Techniques - Simply Put!
 
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Introducing our newest eCourse “Requirements Elicitation Techniques – Simply Put!" View the full course overview and outline at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-requirements-elicitation-techniques/ Prefer reading? Try the book version at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/book-requirements-elicitation-techniques/ DESCRIPTION (lesson 1.1) In this video, author and instructor Tom Hathaway introduces the learning objectives for the course "Requirements Elicitation Techniques — Simply Put!'. He explains why Requirements Elicitation is such a challenge and how we can manage it. ABOUT THE ECOURSE This 90-minute course teaches you several requirements elicitation techniques designed to improve the outcomes of your elicitation interviews and workshops. The presented techniques will help practicing business analysts, future business analysts, subject matter experts, managers, product owners, project managers, and anyone responsible for getting the right requirements from the right people. Upon completion of the entire course, you can: • Identify potential stakeholders early in the project • Manage the requirements elicitation process with a Question File • Recognize, track, and report progress toward requirements completion • Define, document, and analyze business problems to ferret out hidden requirements • Facilitate effective requirements brainstorming sessions to uncover additional requirements • Use 10 critical questions to initiate the requirements elicitation process • Capture and communicate assumptions about your requirements • Avoid “analysis paralysis” by recognizing when it is time to stop eliciting and start deciding SIGN UP for the full course today at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/ecourse-requirements-elicitation-techniques/ To view more IT requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 1052 BA-EXPERTS
Writing Requirements for IT — Simply Put!
 
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Use four simple rules to improve the quality of your IT requirements. Take the full self-paced eCourse at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-requirements/. Prefer reading? Also available as part of an eBook at http://www.amazon.com/Write-Effective-Requirements-Solutions-Exercise-Based-ebook/dp/B00O92Q4G4/. DESCRIPTION: In the world of IT, misunderstood, ambiguous, and assumption-laden requirements cause more project failures than any other single factor. A recent study reported that over seventy percent of all IT project failures are blamed on poor requirements. "Writing Requirements for IT — Simply Put!" gives you a set of 4 simple rules that will make your requirement statements more easily understood by all target audiences. The focus is to increase the "common understanding" between the author of a requirement and the solution providers (e.g., in-house or outsourced IT designers, developers, analysts, and vendors). To enhance the learning process, the course includes several exercises in each section and provides expert feedback for each exercise. Upon completion of this course, you can: • Write requirements that focus on the business need • Test the relevance of each requirement to ensure that it is in scope for your project • Create and maintain a question file to reduce the impact of incorrect assumptions • Minimize the risk of scope creep caused by missed requirements • Confirm that each audience shares a common understanding of the requirements • Use our Peer Perception technique to find ambiguous words and phrases that can lead to misunderstandings • Reduce the ambiguity of a statement by adding context and using standard terms and phrases VIEW THE FULL COURSE OUTLINE at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/product/video-course-writing-requirements/ To view even more requirements training, visit the Business Analysis Learning Store at http://businessanalysisexperts.com/business-analysis-training-store/.
Views: 626 BA-EXPERTS