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Videos uploaded by user “djp3”
Bitcoin Transaction Details - Part 2
 
19:56
A look at the details of the transactions... it gets a little technical, put on your seatbelts. This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 12408 djp3
Bitcoin Transaction Details - Part 1
 
15:47
A look at how a transaction is constructed This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 32585 djp3
Intro to Asymmetric Key Cryptography
 
15:28
This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 39614 djp3
Uses of the Blockchain
 
17:29
This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 26940 djp3
How to read a smart meter with solar panels
 
07:33
In this video I go through four scenarios of how to read a smart meter on a home in California that is outfitted with photovoltaic solar panels and a smart meter. The meter is operated by Southern California Edison and its brand is "OpenWay". The solar panel inverter is a "Sunny Boy" brand installed by Planet Solar, Inc. The first two scenarios show the meter when the home is consuming energy. The third scenario shows a situation when the home is almost breaking even between the amount of energy being consumed and the amount being used. The fourth scenario shows the home generating electricity and putting it back on the smart grid. We review several codes including "Sync net", "Pld 252", "001", "071" and "082" and demonstrate how you can read the cumulative amount of kilowatt-hours that have been produced by the home, the amount being consumed, and the instantaneous production of the entire home's electrical system. We also briefly show the solar panel's meter that just measures the output from the panels and calculate how much electricity is being used by the home when "idle" (In this case 550 watts)
Views: 48243 djp3
Bitcoin Mining
 
17:45
This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 7471 djp3
Interview with Joseph Tainter: Part 2
 
09:05
This video is part of an online course being taught at the University of California, "ICS 5: Global Disruption and Information Technology". Only a portion of the course material is accessible via YouTube. Course Description: The world is changing rapidly. Environmental concerns, social transformations, and economic uncertainties are pervasive. However, certain human needs remain relatively constant—things like nutritious food, clean water, secure shelter, and close human social contact. This course seeks to understand how sociotechnical systems (that is, collections of people and information technologies) may support a transition to a sustainable civilization that allows for human needs and wants to be met in the face of global change. In this course, students will learn about how information technology works, and how humans and information technology interact. In addition it will provide students with a structured opportunity to interrogate what is important to them in life, and how communities and technologies can support those aspects of their lives. Topics covered will include: introductions to information technology, the science behind global change, and scientific studies of human wellbeing, and a range of topical discussions such as IT for local food production, computational systems to support resource sharing, resilient currency technologies, and localized, low-energy technological infrastructure.
Views: 2801 djp3
How to take an online Coursera course for free
 
02:46
I have put together a great sequence of courses on iOS development that are being hosted by an online courseware company called Coursera. As part of my agreement for doing theses MOOC courses, anyone can take them for free. The only things you don't get access to are the assessments (like the quizzes and the homework assignments). If you want to get a certificate then you have to pay to take the course and do the assessments. This video shows you how to simply audit the course. I hope it will help you learn something new! This is my specialization: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/ios-development
Views: 28884 djp3
Interview with Joseph Tainter: Part 1
 
11:14
This video is part of an online course being taught at the University of California, "ICS 5: Global Disruption and Information Technology". Only a portion of the course material is accessible via YouTube. Course Description: The world is changing rapidly. Environmental concerns, social transformations, and economic uncertainties are pervasive. However, certain human needs remain relatively constant—things like nutritious food, clean water, secure shelter, and close human social contact. This course seeks to understand how sociotechnical systems (that is, collections of people and information technologies) may support a transition to a sustainable civilization that allows for human needs and wants to be met in the face of global change. In this course, students will learn about how information technology works, and how humans and information technology interact. In addition it will provide students with a structured opportunity to interrogate what is important to them in life, and how communities and technologies can support those aspects of their lives. Topics covered will include: introductions to information technology, the science behind global change, and scientific studies of human wellbeing, and a range of topical discussions such as IT for local food production, computational systems to support resource sharing, resilient currency technologies, and localized, low-energy technological infrastructure.
Views: 3279 djp3
Quality of Life vs. Standard of Living
 
03:55
This video is part of an online course being taught at the University of California, "ICS 5: Global Disruption and Information Technology". Only a portion of the course material is accessible via YouTube. Course Description: The world is changing rapidly. Environmental concerns, social transformations, and economic uncertainties are pervasive. However, certain human needs remain relatively constant—things like nutritious food, clean water, secure shelter, and close human social contact. This course seeks to understand how sociotechnical systems (that is, collections of people and information technologies) may support a transition to a sustainable civilization that allows for human needs and wants to be met in the face of global change. In this course, students will learn about how information technology works, and how humans and information technology interact. In addition it will provide students with a structured opportunity to interrogate what is important to them in life, and how communities and technologies can support those aspects of their lives. Topics covered will include: introductions to information technology, the science behind global change, and scientific studies of human wellbeing, and a range of topical discussions such as IT for local food production, computational systems to support resource sharing, resilient currency technologies, and localized, low-energy technological infrastructure.
Views: 12046 djp3
What is a Hash Code? part 2
 
14:08
This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 8966 djp3
Introduction to Information Technology: Part 1
 
08:19
This video is part of an online course being taught at the University of California, "ICS 5: Global Disruption and Information Technology". Only a portion of the course material is accessible via YouTube. Course Description: The world is changing rapidly. Environmental concerns, social transformations, and economic uncertainties are pervasive. However, certain human needs remain relatively constant—things like nutritious food, clean water, secure shelter, and close human social contact. This course seeks to understand how sociotechnical systems (that is, collections of people and information technologies) may support a transition to a sustainable civilization that allows for human needs and wants to be met in the face of global change. In this course, students will learn about how information technology works, and how humans and information technology interact. In addition it will provide students with a structured opportunity to interrogate what is important to them in life, and how communities and technologies can support those aspects of their lives. Topics covered will include: introductions to information technology, the science behind global change, and scientific studies of human wellbeing, and a range of topical discussions such as IT for local food production, computational systems to support resource sharing, resilient currency technologies, and localized, low-energy technological infrastructure.
Views: 15650 djp3
Rebound Effect
 
05:02
This video is part of an online course being taught at the University of California, "ICS 5: Global Disruption and Information Technology". Only a portion of the course material is accessible via YouTube. Course Description: The world is changing rapidly. Environmental concerns, social transformations, and economic uncertainties are pervasive. However, certain human needs remain relatively constant—things like nutritious food, clean water, secure shelter, and close human social contact. This course seeks to understand how sociotechnical systems (that is, collections of people and information technologies) may support a transition to a sustainable civilization that allows for human needs and wants to be met in the face of global change. In this course, students will learn about how information technology works, and how humans and information technology interact. In addition it will provide students with a structured opportunity to interrogate what is important to them in life, and how communities and technologies can support those aspects of their lives. Topics covered will include: introductions to information technology, the science behind global change, and scientific studies of human wellbeing, and a range of topical discussions such as IT for local food production, computational systems to support resource sharing, resilient currency technologies, and localized, low-energy technological infrastructure.
Views: 2730 djp3
What happens when you load a webpage?
 
12:39
In this video Prof. Patterson describes what happens when you load a web page in a browser. This lecture brings together the process of DNS resolution, routing, HTML creation on the webserver and rendering in your local browser. Having a correct mental model of the web page loading sequence is important for effectively building web sites and web application infrastructures. This video was filmed to support UC Irvine's Master's of Human Computer Interaction and Design (MHCID) program.
Views: 3515 djp3
Life Cycle Assessment
 
10:51
This video is part of an online course being taught at the University of California, "ICS 5: Global Disruption and Information Technology". Only a portion of the course material is accessible via YouTube. Course Description: The world is changing rapidly. Environmental concerns, social transformations, and economic uncertainties are pervasive. However, certain human needs remain relatively constant—things like nutritious food, clean water, secure shelter, and close human social contact. This course seeks to understand how sociotechnical systems (that is, collections of people and information technologies) may support a transition to a sustainable civilization that allows for human needs and wants to be met in the face of global change. In this course, students will learn about how information technology works, and how humans and information technology interact. In addition it will provide students with a structured opportunity to interrogate what is important to them in life, and how communities and technologies can support those aspects of their lives. Topics covered will include: introductions to information technology, the science behind global change, and scientific studies of human wellbeing, and a range of topical discussions such as IT for local food production, computational systems to support resource sharing, resilient currency technologies, and localized, low-energy technological infrastructure.
Views: 8003 djp3
Bitcoin Block Details
 
11:49
A look at the details of a bitcoin blockchain block This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 3711 djp3
The Origins of Bitcoin
 
05:15
A graphical visualization of the first transactions on the bitcoin network. Each dot is a bitcoin address ("Hello!" when it appears). There is a line between dots when there is a transaction between them ("Transfer"). The size of the dots represent the amount of "influence" that address has (PageRank). It is sized relative to the probability that a bitcoin will end up in that address given the transactions that have been seen. It is approximately the first 1000 transactions starting at block 0. If you would like to use it you may have the following license to use it: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US Title of work: The Origins of Bitcoin Attribute work to name: Donald J. Patterson, Laboratory for Ubiquitous Computing and Interaction Attribute work to URL: http://luci.ics.uci.edu Source work URL: http://youtu.be/lsPxeNbgbZ4
Views: 2445 djp3
Remote iOS Push Notification Tutorial using Firebase
 
45:21
In this video I walk through the steps to create a remote push notification app in iOS with Xcode via Google's Firebase service. Remote push notifications can be used to initiate marketing messages to apps or to connect apps with external software services. The focus of this tutorial is on connecting all the pieces between Xcode, the Apple Developer Site and Google's Firebase web notification service. I don't cover what to do with the notification when you get it or making a User Interface for it instead we focus on all the certificates that need to be made and uploaded in different places and how to do it. I do this in Objective-C and if you follow closely you copy all the code. Porting it to Swift would be trivial. This could easily be incorporated into an existing app or be the basis of a new one. This is an example of some of the course material that is available in a longer course that I put together with Coursera in an online iOS specialization course. That sequence of courses can be audited for free: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/ios-development The source code for this tutorial can be downloaded from gumroad. The first 100 people who use the coupon code firebase2016 can get it for $1.99 (Just trying to pay the various hosting fees I've got, not trying to gouge anyone for source code!) Check it out here: https://gum.co/firebaseAPNS
Views: 33560 djp3
Alternative Currency Pt 1
 
17:15
Professor Bill Maurer discusses Alternative Currency This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 3699 djp3
Alternative Currency Pt 2
 
07:02
Professor Bill Maurer discusses Alternative Currency This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 1900 djp3
Open and Closed Loop Payment Systems Slideshow
 
26:28
This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 2379 djp3
Payment Systems
 
13:11
This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 2438 djp3
Tutorial on making an Android AR scene
 
39:46
It's not going to win any Academy Awards, but in this video I step through the process of using Unity, Vuforia and Eclipse to create an Augmented Related Application for Android. It makes a city scene that is registered to a ten dollar bill. This was made for the ICS 163 class at UCI, but maybe other people will want to watch it too? Who knows? It's a crazy world.
Views: 80706 djp3
Running a custom java jar on an AWS EMR cluster (Part 3/3)
 
13:21
In this three part tutorial, Prof. Patterson shows how to get a Java program running in the Hadoop Map/Reduce framework used by Amazon's Web Services platform. Part 1 is an overview of Map/Reduce and how it is used as a dataflow architecture to do BIg Data jobs. Part 2 is an example of how to configure and program Eclipse to create a Java jar that can be uploaded to Amazon's Elastic Map/Reduce (EMR) service. Part 3 demonstrates how to configure an Amazon cluster so that EMR works with EC2 and S3 to run a distributed data processing job
Views: 1742 djp3
Sending Bitcoin - Part 2
 
19:37
What is it like to send bitcoin? This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 1186 djp3
Intro to Ubiquitous Computing
 
21:08
In this video Prof. Patterson introduces Ubiquitous Computing, a perspective through which to look at Human-Computer Interaction and User Experience. The term and concepts are anchored in a 1991 Scientific American article by Mark Weiser called "The Computer for the 21st Century" This video was filmed to support UC Irvine's Master's of Human Computer Interaction and Design (MHCID) program.
Views: 4022 djp3
Regulation And Bitcoin
 
14:09
Overview of U.S. regulatory perspectives on bitcoin This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 825 djp3
Aquaponics
 
13:21
This video is part of an online course being taught at the University of California, "ICS 5: Global Disruption and Information Technology". Only a portion of the course material is accessible via YouTube. Course Description: The world is changing rapidly. Environmental concerns, social transformations, and economic uncertainties are pervasive. However, certain human needs remain relatively constant—things like nutritious food, clean water, secure shelter, and close human social contact. This course seeks to understand how sociotechnical systems (that is, collections of people and information technologies) may support a transition to a sustainable civilization that allows for human needs and wants to be met in the face of global change. In this course, students will learn about how information technology works, and how humans and information technology interact. In addition it will provide students with a structured opportunity to interrogate what is important to them in life, and how communities and technologies can support those aspects of their lives. Topics covered will include: introductions to information technology, the science behind global change, and scientific studies of human wellbeing, and a range of topical discussions such as IT for local food production, computational systems to support resource sharing, resilient currency technologies, and localized, low-energy technological infrastructure.
Views: 2048 djp3
Introduction to Map/Reduce (Part 1/3)
 
13:57
In this three part tutorial, Prof. Patterson shows how to get a Java program running in the Hadoop Map/Reduce framework used by Amazon's Web Services platform. Part 1 is an overview of Map/Reduce and how it is used as a dataflow architecture to do BIg Data jobs. Part 2 is an example of how to configure and program Eclipse to create a Java jar that can be uploaded to Amazon's Elastic Map/Reduce (EMR) service. Part 3 demonstrates how to configure an Amazon cluster so that EMR works with EC2 and S3 to run a distributed data processing job
Views: 831 djp3
The Origin of Money Pt 2
 
10:59
In which Prof Bill Maurer introduces the origin of money. This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 1900 djp3
What is a Hash Code? part 1
 
14:43
This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 40892 djp3
Here is bitcoin - Part 1
 
05:42
This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 1658 djp3
Introduction to Sustainability
 
16:33
This video is part of an online course being taught at the University of California, "ICS 5: Global Disruption and Information Technology". Only a portion of the course material is accessible via YouTube. Course Description: The world is changing rapidly. Environmental concerns, social transformations, and economic uncertainties are pervasive. However, certain human needs remain relatively constant—things like nutritious food, clean water, secure shelter, and close human social contact. This course seeks to understand how sociotechnical systems (that is, collections of people and information technologies) may support a transition to a sustainable civilization that allows for human needs and wants to be met in the face of global change. In this course, students will learn about how information technology works, and how humans and information technology interact. In addition it will provide students with a structured opportunity to interrogate what is important to them in life, and how communities and technologies can support those aspects of their lives. Topics covered will include: introductions to information technology, the science behind global change, and scientific studies of human wellbeing, and a range of topical discussions such as IT for local food production, computational systems to support resource sharing, resilient currency technologies, and localized, low-energy technological infrastructure.
Views: 4103 djp3
Sociotechnical Systems
 
09:21
This video is part of an online course being taught at the University of California, "ICS 5: Global Disruption and Information Technology". Only a portion of the course material is accessible via YouTube. Course Description: The world is changing rapidly. Environmental concerns, social transformations, and economic uncertainties are pervasive. However, certain human needs remain relatively constant—things like nutritious food, clean water, secure shelter, and close human social contact. This course seeks to understand how sociotechnical systems (that is, collections of people and information technologies) may support a transition to a sustainable civilization that allows for human needs and wants to be met in the face of global change. In this course, students will learn about how information technology works, and how humans and information technology interact. In addition it will provide students with a structured opportunity to interrogate what is important to them in life, and how communities and technologies can support those aspects of their lives. Topics covered will include: introductions to information technology, the science behind global change, and scientific studies of human wellbeing, and a range of topical discussions such as IT for local food production, computational systems to support resource sharing, resilient currency technologies, and localized, low-energy technological infrastructure.
Views: 4124 djp3
The Relationship between Github and Heroku
 
04:53
In this video Prof. Patterson describes the relationship between Github and Heroku and gives a short introduction to what they actually do. This video was filmed to support UC Irvine's Master's of Human Computer Interaction and Design (MHCID) program.
Views: 819 djp3
The Origin of Money Pt 1
 
09:30
In which Prof Bill Maurer introduces the origin of money. This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 3235 djp3
Welcome to Bitcoin Summer Session I 2015
 
10:41
This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 1644 djp3
Intro to Symmetric Key Cryptography
 
16:31
This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. photocredits from the video: https://d3tixod1wp885b.cloudfront.net/7c/b7807f6583218dcfaccf5f5f3f9284/book-safe.jpg http://thefrencheye.blogspot.com/2011/01/bank-vault-doors.html http://www.informationsecuritybuzz.com/securitybuzz/wp-content/uploads/google-Bot.jpg "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer." photocredits from the video https://d3tixod1wp885b.cloudfront.net/7c/b7807f6583218dcfaccf5f5f3f9284/book-safe.jpg http://thefrencheye.blogspot.com/2011/01/bank-vault-doors.html http://www.informationsecuritybuzz.com/securitybuzz/wp-content/uploads/google-Bot.jpg
Views: 3514 djp3
Sending Bitcoin - Part 1
 
14:20
What is it like to send bitcoin? This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 3051 djp3
Creating a Java Program for Map/Reduce (Part 2/3)
 
30:36
In this three part tutorial, Prof. Patterson shows how to get a Java program running in the Hadoop Map/Reduce framework used by Amazon's Web Services platform. Part 1 is an overview of Map/Reduce and how it is used as a dataflow architecture to do BIg Data jobs. Part 2 is an example of how to configure and program Eclipse to create a Java jar that can be uploaded to Amazon's Elastic Map/Reduce (EMR) service. Part 3 demonstrates how to configure an Amazon cluster so that EMR works with EC2 and S3 to run a distributed data processing job
Views: 1120 djp3
Bitcoin Developments - Payment Protocol
 
08:28
This video is part of a larger online course, "From Barter to Bitcoin: Society, Technology and the Future of Money" run by Prof. Bill Maurer and Prof. Donald J. Patterson In addition to the video on YouTube there is a variety of other content available to students enrolled in the class. "In 2008, a person calling himself or herself or themselves Satoshi Nakamoto released a paper suggesting a system for an anonymous, peer-to-peer alternative money. Bitcoin was born. Although not the first digital currency ever proposed, nor the first challenger to fiat money, bitcoin is the first to have captured the broad imagination of speculators, coders, regulators, criminals and the mass media. This course puts Bitcoin in context: how do we understand money as a social, political and technological phenomenon? From discussions of ancient transactions to the rise of state-issued currencies, we will explore the social and technical aspects of bitcoin, its predecessors and potential successors, and how its features echo aspects of many different historical transaction systems. No prior knowledge of economics or computing is required. There is little academic writing on bitcoin. And this may be the first truly academic class on the topic. We want to put bitcoin in a wider perspective, to reflect on what it means for society, politics and economics, as well as how it helps us think about money both a social and a technical phenomenon. This class is not an advanced seminar on bitcoin--we will not be delving deeply into the inner workings of the system, but instead providing a bird's-eye overview with enough technical detail for you to be able to put media stories, hype and hope around bitcoin in perspective. Similarly, this is not a class in monetary economics--we won't go too deeply into monetary theory or policy, the money supply, or inflation. Instead the class invites you to think more deeply about one of the oldest systems of technology on the planet, and most ubiquitous: money, whether coin, cash, credit card or cryptocurrency, we humans have been making money for most of the past 10,000 years. How we do so in the future is a question bitcoin just maybe helps us answer."
Views: 844 djp3
Introduction to Information Technology: Part 2
 
07:45
This video is part of an online course being taught at the University of California, "ICS 5: Global Disruption and Information Technology". Only a portion of the course material is accessible via YouTube. Course Description: The world is changing rapidly. Environmental concerns, social transformations, and economic uncertainties are pervasive. However, certain human needs remain relatively constant—things like nutritious food, clean water, secure shelter, and close human social contact. This course seeks to understand how sociotechnical systems (that is, collections of people and information technologies) may support a transition to a sustainable civilization that allows for human needs and wants to be met in the face of global change. In this course, students will learn about how information technology works, and how humans and information technology interact. In addition it will provide students with a structured opportunity to interrogate what is important to them in life, and how communities and technologies can support those aspects of their lives. Topics covered will include: introductions to information technology, the science behind global change, and scientific studies of human wellbeing, and a range of topical discussions such as IT for local food production, computational systems to support resource sharing, resilient currency technologies, and localized, low-energy technological infrastructure.
Views: 4624 djp3
Introduction to Scientific Thinking
 
10:33
This video is part of an online course being taught at the University of California, "ICS 5: Global Disruption and Information Technology". Only a portion of the course material is accessible via YouTube. Course Description: The world is changing rapidly. Environmental concerns, social transformations, and economic uncertainties are pervasive. However, certain human needs remain relatively constant—things like nutritious food, clean water, secure shelter, and close human social contact. This course seeks to understand how sociotechnical systems (that is, collections of people and information technologies) may support a transition to a sustainable civilization that allows for human needs and wants to be met in the face of global change. In this course, students will learn about how information technology works, and how humans and information technology interact. In addition it will provide students with a structured opportunity to interrogate what is important to them in life, and how communities and technologies can support those aspects of their lives. Topics covered will include: introductions to information technology, the science behind global change, and scientific studies of human wellbeing, and a range of topical discussions such as IT for local food production, computational systems to support resource sharing, resilient currency technologies, and localized, low-energy technological infrastructure.
Views: 3796 djp3
Encrypting Email on OS X and iOS Tutorial
 
30:08
In this video I walk through the steps to encrypt email using S/MIME technology on OS X and then on iOS devices. I leverage the Comodo email certificate service which is free and has no relationship to me. To follow this tutorial you will need a Mac computer and an iOS device and email service. Encrypted email can be used to meet privacy regulations, to protect whistle-blowing activity, to communicate commercial secrets using adversarial networks, or to communicate with foreign nationals in locations in which the state controls significant portions of the Internet infrastructure. The focus of this tutorial is on connecting all the pieces between Keychain Access, and Apple Mail on iOS and OS X. No programming is required.
Views: 4078 djp3
2017 MacBook Pro (Kaby Lake) Unboxing Video
 
06:01
In which Prof. Patterson unboxes a new 2017 MacBook Pro laptop. Silver case. 15 inch. 3.1 Ghz. 16 GB RAM. 1 TB SSD drive. Radeon Pro 560. He is so grateful for this new machine which will enable him to do important work faster.
Views: 1788 djp3
Overview of the Domain Name Service (DNS)
 
15:51
In this video Prof. Patterson introduces the role and basic operation of the Domain Name Service or (DNS). The domain name service is the system responsible for translating human readable names like (www.djp3.net) to IP addresses like (104.196.197.190). The process has many hierarchical layers, and caching mechanisms to improve redundancy and resiliency and reduce latency in the system. This video was filmed to support UC Irvine's Master's of Human Computer Interaction and Design (MHCID) program.
Views: 202 djp3
iOS Sidescroller Game Coding Tutorial
 
01:05:40
In this video I walk through the steps to create a simple sidescrolling game in iOS with Xcode. I walk through the process of creating the project, importing the assets, building the game world, setting up physics and handling touch input. I do this in Objective-C and if you follow closely you can make your own game with me. It could be a fun hobby project or a unique gift for a friend. This is an example of some of the course material that is available in a longer course that I put together with Coursera in an online iOS specialization course. That sequence of courses can be audited for free: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/ios-development The source code for this tutorial can be downloaded from gumroad. The first 100 people who use the coupon code ytmartha2016 can get it for $1.99 (Just trying to pay the various hosting fees I've got, not trying to gouge anyone for source code!) Check it out here: https://gum.co/marthasworld
Views: 4504 djp3
Unity GPS Draw Assignment Part 1
 
10:01
http://www.ics.uci.edu/~djp3/classes/2014_03_ICS163/tasks/gpsdraw2.html
Views: 7693 djp3
Callbacks for Light Sensor
 
17:21
Tutorial Videos for Fall 2014 INF 133: Android Sensor App: http://www.ics.uci.edu/~djp3/classes/2014_09_INF133/tasks/task_android.html
Views: 1510 djp3
Basic Network Routing Concepts
 
20:40
In this video Prof. Patterson provides a basic introduction to the idea of Internet routing. The idea that there are many computers involved in the transportation of data from one point on the Internet to another, how that path can be identified and what the implications are for security of Internet protocols http and https. This video was filmed to support UC Irvine's Master's of Human Computer Interaction and Design (MHCID) program.
Views: 2851 djp3