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Floating vs. Fixed Exchange Rates- Macroeconomics 5.4
 
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Float it or fix it? Mr. Clifford expalins the difference between floating and fixed exchange rates and how countries peg the value of their currency to another currency. Make sure to watch this video first: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DVYVfI81R8
Views: 245085 Jacob Clifford
Fixed and Floating Exchange Rates
 
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Fixed and Floating Exchange Rates - A look at the difference between fixed and floating exchange rates, specifically looking at how fixed exchange rate regimes are managed
Views: 68056 EconplusDal
How Exchange Rates Work
 
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● We explain topics simply. So Subscribe if you want to learn while being entertained. ✔ Please like the video and comment if you enjoyed - it helps a lot! ▶ If you want a question answered then ask in the comments and we may make a video about it! About the video: You may have traveled a lot and wondered why you get more of one currency when you exchange it for another. If so, you have witnessed exchange rates in action, but do you know how they work? Watch the video to find out what exchange rates are, how to convert between them and the different systems which determine a currencies exchange rate. Historically the gold standard system had been used, which fixed currency to a select value of gold, held in a vault. The three main systems are the floating, managed and fixed exchange rate systems. The floating system has minimal government intervention, using supply and demand to determine the exchange rate. The managed exchange rate is allowed to be within a permitted band and a fixed exchange rate is usually pegged to a currency with the interest of being competitive in the international market. The video explains this in more detail and with helpful picture to guide you through the subject.
Views: 266692 SimplyExplain
Floating and Fixed Exchange Rates
 
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This revision video looks at fixed, managed floating and fixed exchange rates and considers some of the advantages / drawbacks of each choice of currency system. A Level Economics Revision Flashcards These superb packs of revision flashcards contain everything you need to cover for AQA & Edexcel A Level Economics A 20% discount is automatically applied if you order 4 or more flashcard packs in the same order! https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards CONNECT WITH TUTOR2U ECONOMICS Web: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics Twitter: tutor2u Economics: https://twitter.com/tutor2uEcon Twitter: Geoff Riley https://twitter.com/tutor2uGeoff Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tutor2u Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tutor2uecon/ MORE HELP WITH A LEVEL & IB ECONOMICS Online webinars: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/events/students/online Revision Workshops: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/events/students/face-to-face Study Notes on every Topic: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/reference/study-notes Key topics: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/topics - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 24196 tutor2u
#72, Foreign exchange rate (Class 12 macroeconomics)
 
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Class 12 macroeconomics ..... Foreign exchange rate.... Foreign exchange.... Types of foreign exchange rate ..... Depreciation and appreciation of currency.... Contact for my book 7690041256 Economics on your tips video 72
Views: 280870 Economics on your tips
Fixed vs Floating Exchange Rates (Arguments For and Against)
 
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Fixed vs Floating Exchange Rates (Arguments For and Against) - The arguments for and against a fixed and floating exchange rate
Views: 51424 EconplusDal
Exchange Rates Unit:  Fixed Exchange Rate System
 
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Hey Everyone, This is video 3 of 10 videos in “The Exchange Rates Series”. Watch the entire series right here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNI2Up0JUWkH_sdGVbD8ADVwIApVuVIMe As a teacher of IB Economics in Santiago, Chile, these videos were created to help Standard Level students navigate their way through their two-year course of study. I have made these videos public in the hope that they might be helpful to other economics students around the world. It is important to note that I use Jocelyn Blink and Ian Dorton's "IB Economics Course Companion" as the primary text in class. As a result, many of these videos use this text as source material. I have found it to be an excellent resource for students. Another source you may find helpful is Jason Welker’s site www.econclassroom.com. Welker’s site and course companions are excellent and have served as another source for these videos. Thank you Jocelyn, Ian, and Jason. I hope you find these videos helpful to your study of IB Economics and please let me know if you have any suggestions to improve them. Enjoy! Brad Cartwright
Imports, Exports, and Exchange Rates: Crash Course Economics #15
 
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What is a trade deficit? Well, it all has to do with imports and exports and, well, trade. This week Jacob and Adriene walk you through the basics of imports, exports, and exchange. So, you remember the specialization and trade thing, right? So, that leads to imports and exports. Economically, in the aggregate, this is usually a good thing. Globalization and free trade do tend to increase overall wealth. But not everybody wins. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 828171 CrashCourse
The Determinants of Exchange Rates in a Floating Exchange Rate System
 
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To understand how a country's currency might appreciate or depreciate, you must understand the variable that can affect demand or supply for the currency on the forex market. This lesson will introduce a useful acronym (TIPSY) for remembering the determinants of exchange rates, and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of floating exchange rate systems. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 23826 Jason Welker
What is a Crawling Peg?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Crawling Peg” A crawling peg is a system of exchange rate adjustment in which a currency with a fixed exchange rate is allowed to fluctuate within a band of rates. The procedure in which a currency's exchange rate is periodically adjusted, usually to counter the effects of inflation. The exchange rate remains fixed between one change (crawl) to the next. The par value of the stated currency is also adjusted frequently due to market factors such as inflation. This gradual shift of the currency's par value is done as an alternative to a sudden and significant devaluation of the currency. For example, in the 1990s, Mexico had fixed its peso with the U.S. dollar. However, due to the significant inflation in Mexico, as compared to the U.S., it was evident that the peso would need to be severely devalued. Because a rapid devaluation would create instability, Mexico put into place a crawling peg exchange rate adjustment system, and the peso was slowly devalued toward a more appropriate exchange rate. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy - ITA
Fixed exchange rates
 
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In this video you will learn how fixed exchange rate systems work, their advantages and disadvantages and what is meant by devaluation and revaluation.
Views: 2640 EnhanceTuition
Effectiveness of different policies for mundell-fleming ISLM model
 
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A short clip about the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policy in mundell-fleming model, which is similar to the ISLM framework.
Views: 62509 Bryan Lim
Fixed and Floating Exchange Rates
 
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​This is a video recording of a revision webinar looking at the economics of floating, managed floating and fixed exchange rates. ​​ - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 4721 tutor2u
What is Exchange Rate : Explained with Animation
 
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This Video Explains the following: 1)Exchange Rates. 2)Why the value of Currency Fluctuates. 3)How the value of a currency is decided. 4)How Demand of Goods influences the Value of a Currency. For More Animated Explanations under 5 minutes, Subscribe to Science Digest. (Suggestions/Errors, please let us know. We appreciate it.)
Views: 62178 Science Digest
Fixed Exchange Rate System
 
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Fixed Exchange Rate System watch more videos at https://www.tutorialspoint.com/videotutorials/index.htm Lecture By: Ms. Madhu Bhatia, Tutorials Point India Private Limited
FLOATING AND FIXED EXCHANGE RATE
 
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ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES -- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 8430 Vape Factory
Forex Markets - Exchange Rates & the Balance of Payments (1/4) | Principles of Macroeconomics
 
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The focus of this video is explaining the foreign exchange market. Other topics in the series: - the foreign exchange market - exchange rates - demand in the foreign exchange market - supply in the foreign exchange market - market equilibrium in the foreign exchange market - changes in demand in the foreign exchange market - changes in supply in the foreign exchange market - changes in the exchange rate - arbitrage - exchange rate policy - flexible exchange rates - fixed exchange rates - crawling peg - balance of payments accounts - borrowers and lenders - debtors and creditors - the global loanable funds market foreign exchange market | foreign exchange market macroeconomics | foreign exchange trading | foreign exchange risk
Views: 2990 Inspirare
Advantages of a Fixed Exchange Rate
 
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See more videos at: http://talkboard.com.au/ In this video, we will look at the advantages and disadvantages of a fixed exchange rate. It is important to understand what a fixed exchange rate is, so that we can work out how it benefits an economy.
Views: 2795 talkboard.com.au
Macro Unit 5, Question 6: Exchange Rate and Inflation
 
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Mr. Clifford's app is now available at the App Store and Google play. His mobile app is perfect for students in AP macroeconomics or college introductory macro courses. It is designed to help you ace the exam, final, or AP test. The app includes over 60 new economics videos that are not available on YouTube. These videos explain complex concepts in a student-friendly, easy to understand manor that will help you retain the information. Join the hundreds of thousands of students that have used Mr. Clifford's videos and resources to ace your macroeconomics course.
Views: 14372 Jacob Clifford
Flexible Exchange Rate System
 
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Flexible Exchange Rate System watch more videos at https://www.tutorialspoint.com/videotutorials/index.htm Lecture By: Ms. Madhu Bhatia, Tutorials Point India Private Limited
Exchange rate regimes: gold standard, fixed and flexible exchange rate (ECO)
 
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Subject : Economic Paper :Advanced Macroeconomics
Views: 12725 Vidya-mitra
Fixed vs. Flexible Exchange Rate Regimes and Policies
 
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Interview granted to "Nova Makedonija" 1. What is your opinion about fixed exchange rate regimes? A. Fixed exchange rate regimes are useful in crisis circumstances, when the restoration of stability and the trust of citizens, investors, and speculators is essential. Such harsh measures, usually coupled with capital controls, should be short-term and lifted immediately when the economy had picked up and expectations have settled. Maintaining a fixed-rate regime in the long-term has nefarious and dangerous consequences as the exchange rate diverges further and further from the real value of the currency, adjusted to inflation. This erodes the competitiveness of exporters, renders imports relatively cheap, distorts the price signal throughout the economy (in other words: people don't know what the real value of their currency is abroad). It also leads to speculative attacks on the currency from the outside (if the currency is convertible and traded in free foreign exchange markets) - or from the inside (in the form of a thriving black foreign exchange market.) 2. What is the connection between exchange rate policies and better economic results? A. This depends on how open the country is to the global capital markets and what percentage of its GDP is made up of international trade and various transfers from abroad (such as remittances.) As a rule, the more exposed a country is to the ups and downs of the global market, the more it should have a flexible and adaptable exchange rate policy. A country that exports and imports a lot needs to have competitive manufacturing, services (e.g., tourism), and agricultural sectors. An important part of such competitiveness is having the correct exchange rate which reflects inflation differentials, purchasing power disparities, relative advantages, and structural elements. Such constant adjustment (up AND down, for instance within a band) is excluded by a fixed rate regime. By adopting a fixed exchange rate, the country is giving up on one of its most important automatic economic stabilizers and policy tools, as Greece is discovering now to its great cost. 3. Is a fixed exchange rate good for controlling inflation? Is there a possibility to control the prices and make a correction of the value of the currency? Inflation reflects expectations of the population regarding the future level of prices. These expectations are affected by the level of stability inside the country - but also by factors outside it. In a country that is open to international trade, foreign capital flows, and foreign direct investment, external instability is far more important than internal stability. Indeed, in countries like Macedonia, Israel, and Brazil, most of the inflation comes from the outside via the soaring prices of imports such as energy products, foodstuffs, and raw materials. There is little the monetary authorities can do to affect such imported inflation. Still, it is true that a string of unannounced, arbitrary, unscripted, incomprehensible, and large devaluations will create inflation. The exchange rate policy has to be transparent, predictable, rational, and adaptable. There are dozens of countries around the world with various modesl of flexible exchange rates and, yet, with stable prices: these two are not mutually exclusive. Flexible exchange rates mean that the currency can do down (devaluation) - but also up (appreciation or revaluation.) 4. What happens to an economy if people from abroad stop sending money? Depends on: (1) What is the share of remittances in the GDP; and (2) What are the remittances used for. In most poor countries remittances constitute 10-15% of GDP and they are used by the recipients mostly for consumption. When remittances decline, consumption and GDP are adversely affected, the level of foreign exchange reserves declines, and outlays on social welfare increase. 5. Can a country defeat the trade deficit with a fixed exchange rate? The exchange rate is only one component in the overall competitiveness of the economy. Structural reforms in the public sector and various institutions; infusion of management and marketing skills; innovation; a functioning financial system; new inputs (equipment, information technology, intellectual property under license); focused and up-to- date training and re-skilling; better access to core export markets; the economic conditions in these export markets; level and relevance of the workforce's education; mentality and ethos - all these are as important as the exchange rate alone. Germany and Japan had overvalued currencies for decades and still were able to achieve prosperity and dominate international trade.
Views: 10190 vakninmusings
Fixed Exchange Rate
 
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See more videos at: http://talkboard.com.au/ In this video, we look at the central government can fix the value of the currency either above or below the fundamental value.
Views: 12968 talkboard.com.au
Introduction to Exchange Rates and Forex Markets
 
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Different countries have different currencies, and understanding how their values are determined is fundamental to understanding how trade between nations takes place. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 35914 Jason Welker
L3/P2: Rupee Devaluation & Exchange rate regimes
 
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Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: - if $1=50 or $1=60: who decides this exchange rate and how? - Fixed exchange rate regime: mechanism and limitations. - Floating exchange rate regime: mechanism limitations. - Difference between devaluation and depreciation of Rupee - Difference between revaluation and appreciation of rupee? - Historic trend of Indian rupee’s fall/weakening against US dollar - How does devaluation of the currency boost its exports? - Difference between NEER and REER? How does it help determining whether currency is undervalued or overvalued? - “Managed” floating extended rate regime. Powerpoint available at http://Mrunal.org/download Exam-Utility: UPSC CSAT, CDS, CAPF, Bank, RBI, IBPS, SSC and other competitive exams, IIM, XLRI, MBA interviews and GDPI Venue: Sardar Patel Institute of Public Administration (SPIPA), Satellite, Ahmedabad, Gujarat,India
Views: 226989 Mrunal Patel
The Gold Standard: How Does it Work? Do We Need It?
 
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The Gold Standard: How Does it Work? Do We Need It? 🌟SPECIAL OFFERS: ► Free 30 day Audible Trial & Get 2 Free Audiobooks: https://amzn.to/2Iu08SE ...OR: 🌟 try Audiobooks.com 🎧for FREE! : http://affiliates.audiobooks.com/tracking/scripts/click.php?a_aid=5b8c26085f4b8 The gold standard is a monetary system in which the standard economic unit of account is a fixed weight of gold. There are distinct kinds of gold standard. First, the gold specie standard is a system in which the monetary unit is associated with circulating gold coins, or with the unit of value defined in terms of one particular circulating gold coin in conjunction with subsidiary coinage made from a less valuable metal. Similarly, the gold exchange standard typically does not involve the circulation of gold coins, instead using notes or coins made of silver or other metals, but where the authorities guarantee a fixed exchange rate with another country that is on the gold standard. This creates a de facto gold standard, in that the value of the silver coins has a fixed external value in terms of gold that is independent of the inherent silver value. Finally, the gold bullion standard is a system in which gold coins do not circulate, but in which the authorities have agreed to sell gold bullion on demand at a fixed price in exchange for the circulating currency. No country currently uses the gold standard as the basis of its monetary system, although several hold substantial gold reserves. (from Wikipedia) There are strong arguments for and against the gold standard. Others say that neither the Federal Reserve OR the gold standard should exist, and that instead, the U.S. Treasury itself should control the currency supply by issuing a Greenback currency (rather than the PRIVATE Federal Reserve Bank). This position's case has been well made in the documentary film "The Secret of Oz" by Bill Still. Watch "The Secret of Oz" for free on Bill Still's channel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swkq2E8mswI&feature=plcp SUBSCRIBE to Bright Enlightenment: http://www.youtube.com/BrightEnlightenment Join the club: http://www.facebook.com/BrightEnlightenment What do you think? Federal Reserve? Gold Standard? U.S. Treasury Greenbacks? Leave a comments, thoughts, and opinions in the comments!
Views: 100426 Bright Enlightenment
Currency Exchange Introduction
 
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Introduction to how exchange rates can fluctuate More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=itoNb1lb5hY
Views: 538553 Khan Academy
Exchange Rate System in India and its Types - Indian Economy for Prelims 2018
 
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You can join my Live classes on Economy here: https://goo.gl/urfp1H In this lesson, Ayussh explains the exchange rate system and its types. This is an important concept to understand under Indian Economy for UPSC 2018 preparation. An exchange rate regime is the way an authority manages its currency in relation to other currencies and the foreign exchange market. Between the two limits of fixed and freely floating exchange regimes, there can be several other types of regimes. In their operational objective, it is closely related to the monetary policy of the country with both depending on common factors of influence and impact. The exchange system in India has a big impact on world trade and financial flows. The volume of such transactions and the speed at which they are growing makes the exchange rate regime a central piece of Indian Economy. Download the Unacademy Learning App here: Android: https://goo.gl/02OhYI iOS: https://goo.gl/efbytP Download the Unacademy Educator App here: Android: https://goo.gl/H4LGHE iOS: https://goo.gl/1FkFHp Do Subscribe and be a part of the community for more such lessons here: https://goo.gl/gycFVs
Views: 6531 Unacademy
Fixed Exchange Rate and Flexible Exchange Rate | International Trade & Balance of Payment Economics
 
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Fixed Exchange Rate and Flexible Exchange Rate | International Trade & Balance of Payment | Economics Videos | Mathur Sir Classes #InternationalTrade #BalanceofPayment #Economics #bcom #CA #CS #bba #MathurSirClasses If you like this video and wish to support this EDUCATION channel, please contribute via, * Paytm a/c : 9830489610 * Paypal a/c : www.paypal.me/mathursirclasses [Every contribution is helpful] Thanks & All the Best WE NEED YOUR SUPPORT TO GROW UP..SO HELP US!! Hope you guys like this one. If you do, please hit Like!!! Please Share it with your friends! Thank You! Please SUBSCRIBE for more videos. video edited by : Gyankaksh Educational Institute (09051378712) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFzUEzxnRDsbWIA5rnappwQ?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 178 Mathur Sir Classes
The Determinants of Exchange Rates and Managed Exchange Rate Systems - HD
 
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This video lecture walks students through a few scenarios that could lead to a change in a country's exchange rate and introduces the concept of a managed exchange rate system. Japan and the US are used as an example. We'll see what happens to the value of the Yen when the Bank of Japan engages in expansionary monetary policy, as well as what happens to the dollar when foreign investors speculate on its future appreciation. We'll also see how the US government may go about intervening in the market for its own currency to assure a stable exchange rate against the Yen, and show the effect of exchange rate management on the foreign exchange market for dollars in Japan. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 45386 Jason Welker
What is an Exchange Rate?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Exchange Rate”. Exchange rate is the value at which one currency may be converted into another. The exchange rate is used when simply converting one currency to another such as for the purposes of travel to another country, or for engaging in speculation or trading in the foreign exchange market. There are a wide variety of factors which influence the exchange rate, such as interest rates, inflation, and the state of politics and the economy in each country. In finance, an exchange rate also known as a foreign-exchange rate, forex rate, FX rate between two currencies is the rate at which one currency will be exchanged for another. It is also regarded as the value of one country’s currency in terms of another currency. For example, an interbank exchange rate of 91 Japanese yen to the United States dollar means that 91 yen will be exchanged for each US dollar or that one US dollar will be exchanged for each 91 yen. Exchange rates are determined in the foreign exchange market, which is open to a wide range of different types of buyers and sellers where currency trading is continuous: 24 hours a day except weekends. The spot exchange rate refers to the current exchange rate. The forward exchange rate refers to an exchange rate that is quoted and traded today but for delivery and payment on a specific future date. In the retail currency exchange market, a different buying rate and selling rate will be quoted by money dealers. Most trades are to or from the local currency. The buying rate is the rate at which money dealers will buy foreign currency, and the selling rate is the rate at which they will sell the currency. The quoted rates will incorporate an allowance for a dealer's margin (or profit) in trading, or else the margin may be recovered in the form of a "commission" or in some other way. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy
Exchange Rate Determination
 
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Free app! Access all videos on this channel by putting myapp.is/Economics%20Diagrams into your phone browser and follow the instructions This video looks at how exchange rates are determined through the supply and demand of a currency in the Foreign Exchange (FOREX) market
Views: 41050 Steve Lobsey
MMT:  A Gold Standard Or Fixed Exchange Rate Reduces Domestic Policy Space
 
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Professor L. Randall Wray on why a fixed exchange rate regime (such as a gold standard) reduces domestic policy space. This is because the government must operate its budget and the economy in such a way as to ensure that it grows the amount of reserves it has, or at minimum maintains it. In an exchange rate peg, the government makes purchases in the market using its own currency and the foreign currency in order to manipulate the price away from its market value. Therefore, the government must ensure that it has the foreign currency it's pegged to. Foreign currency comes into the country when the country exports (sells goods in exchange for foreign currency), and so the country must export more than it imports. The way to do this is with austerity, to keep domestic wages low so your citizens can't import, or to limit imports by law. With a gold standard, the government must ensure that it has a steady supply of gold to meet conversion demand. So, if the government allowed the money supply to increase (like by deficit spending) this would increase the demand for conversion, and eat into the government's gold supply. To combat this, the government can sell bonds (and allow the market determine the interest rate) to lock that money up so its citizens don't convert. In both cases, the amount the government can spend is limited. In a fixed currency exchange rate, too much spending will promote employment, cause wages to rise, leading to rising imports, and decreasing the government's foreign currency reserve. In a gold standard, the government must issue bonds when it deficit spends, and must let the market determine the interest rate, potentially leading to a runaway deficit and forced default. But on a floating exchange rate, neither of these can happen: the government can determine how much to spend and what interest rates should be, without fear of defaulting on any promises. See the whole video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-KRi9nF8BiA Follow Deficit Owls on Facebook and Twitter: https://www.facebook.com/DeficitOwls/ https://twitter.com/DeficitOwls
Views: 986 Deficit Owls
Exchange rate 04:  Impact on imports and exports .flv
 
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Impact of a change in the Rand/dollar exchange rate on imports and exports
Views: 21205 lostmy1
Foreign exchange rate and its types
 
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In this video I am explaining the topic of Foreign exchange Foreign exchange rate Currency depreciation Currency appreciation Types of foreign exchange rate - Fixed exchange rate Floating exchange rate Managed floating exchange rate Plz like and share the video Subscribe my channel to watch more videos of class Xll economics Give your comments at [email protected]
Fixed vs Floating Exchange Rates
 
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AEI scholar Derek Scissors defines and compares fixed vs. floating exchange rates as part of this Tax Foundation University lecture series on the economics of trade.
Views: 1798 TaxFoundation
Managed Exchange Rate Systems Part 1
 
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To avoid the volatility and uncertainty that often accompany a floating exchange rate, some governments and central banks choose to manage or peg their currency's value against another currency. This lesson explains the tools by which an exchange rate can be managed and maintained within a range of values, using the Swiss National Bank's decision to peg the Swiss franc against the euro in 2011 as an example. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 10045 Jason Welker
Word of the Day: Currency Peg
 
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Watch more Capital Account @ http://www.youtube.com/CapitalAccount http://twitter.com/laurenlyster http://twitter.com/coveringdelta A currency peg, otherwise referred to as a fixed exchange rate, is a type of exchange system wherein a currency's value is matched to the value of another single currency or to a basket of other currencies, or to another measure of value, such as gold. The most readily well-known "currency manipulator" is China, which pegs the yuan to the us dollar. Their's is a flexible peg, but a peg nonetheless, and we look at this during our word of the day, as well as the case of Argentina. These are two very different types of currency pegs. In the case of the yuan, China artificially undervalues their currency relative to the dollar, in an effort to cheapen their exports and drive growth with sales to the US and other countries. This is an export led growth model, facilitated by a cheap currency. The people's bank of china achieves this buy regularly going out into the open market and buying us dollars in return of chinese yuan. This helps to push down the value of the yuan relative to the dollar, cheapening the chinese currency, but also causing inflation domestically because china has to print all this extra money in order to soak up the USD it buys. When a country like china loosens it's peg, its currency will naturally rise. In the case of Argentina, the central bank in that country was keeping its currency artificially high relative to the USD. When Argentina headed into depression during the early 2000's it became increasingly difficult for the country to maintain the peg, because in the case of countries that are artificially increasing the value of their currency, the national central bank had to intervene in the market by selling foreign exchange reserve in return for pesos. This had its limits, since the Argentinian central bank only had so many reserves to sell. The advantage of having a strong and stable currency, as was the case in Argentina throughout the 90's is that it attracts a lot of foreign capital. However, when times get tough, a lot of that capital can leave and then you can find yourself bankrupt very quickly.
Views: 8822 RT America
Why Rupees is falling against Dollar $ / How exchange rate is fixed / by Pritam Rathee
 
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why Rupees is falling against dollar main economic issue today All important explanation has been given in this video so that you can go through with your knowledge/ Doubt easily at home....If you find this video relevant for you so please like, comment and share.... And subscribe our channel.... And for more updates also follow us on Facebook https://m.facebook.com/PritamRathee/posts/?refsrc=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2F&_rdr Instagram https://www.instagram.com/sric_commerce_buzz/ #sriccommercebuzz #ExchangeRate #RupeesVsDoller
Views: 70 Sric Commerce Buzz
Nominal and Real Exchange Rates
 
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An explanation of the difference between nominal and real exchange rates and why the real exchange rate is important, from a world perspective
Views: 80714 Damien King
Balance of Payments - Exchange Rates & the Balance of Payments (4/4) | Principles of Macroeconomics
 
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The focus of this video is explaining the balance of payments. Other topics in the series: - the foreign exchange market - exchange rates - demand in the foreign exchange market - supply in the foreign exchange market - market equilibrium in the foreign exchange market - changes in demand in the foreign exchange market - changes in supply in the foreign exchange market - changes in the exchange rate - arbitrage - exchange rate policy - flexible exchange rates - fixed exchange rates - crawling peg - balance of payments accounts - borrowers and lenders - debtors and creditors - the global loanable funds market foreign exchange market | foreign exchange market macroeconomics | foreign exchange trading | foreign exchange risk
Views: 2824 Inspirare
Calculating Exchange Rates from Linear Equations - part 1
 
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An exchange rate is simply an equilibrium price in a market for a currency, and like the prices of other goods, services and resources, a currency's value can be calculated if the equations for supply and demand are known. This lesson will demonstrate how to calculate an equilibrium exchange rate from linear equations, and in part 2 demonstrate how an intervention by a central bank can lead to a change in demand or supply of a currency and thus trigger a change in its value. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 3253 Jason Welker
Exchange rate primer | AP Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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Learn about what an exchange rate is and how to determine the cost of goods in another currency. AP(R) Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Macroeconomics is all about how an entire nationÕs performance is determined and improved over time. Learn how factors like unemployment, inflation, interest rates, economic growth and recession are caused and how they affect individuals and society as a whole. We hit the traditional topics from an AP Macroeconomics course, including basic economic concepts, economic indicators, and the business cycle, national income and price determination, the financial sector, the long-run consequences of stabilization policies, and international trade and finance. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy. View more lessons or practice this subject at http://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/ap-macroeconomics/ap-open-economy-international-trade-and-finance/exchange-rates/v/exchange-rate-primer-ap-macroeconomics-khan-academy?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc&utm_campaign=apmacroeconomics AP Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Welcome to Economics! In this lesson we'll define Economic and introduce some of the fundamental tools and perspectives economists use to understand the world around us! Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc Volunteer here: https://www.khanacademy.org/contribute?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 4235 Khan Academy
Interest rates and the effect on exchange rates
 
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You wanted an explanation. Here it is.
Views: 2719 Michael Norman
Balance of Payments _ Part1 _ Foreign Exchange Rate _ Mauli Gupta
 
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Excited to share video lectures from the brightest students at IIT & Delhi University. Learner (www.learner.in) is India's largest platform where Students TEACH Students. Download App at http://bit.ly/2l3zRzq and call us at 011-41082172 to get access code. Prepare for Boards for CBSE syllabus, NCERT Pattern, Class 12th. Download app from http://app.learner.in or visit website at http://www.learner.in to get more videos, notes & questions.
Views: 46296 learner.in