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TRIPS (Trade Related of Intellectual Property Rights) - The Hindu Editorial Decode
 
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TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) video deal with the IAS preparation. TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) would help you in in IAS 2017 exam and IAS 2018 exam. TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) tutorial deals with Patent ,Trips , Trips plus dissected Video by BrainyIAS for IAS Preparation. How to prepare for IAS exam, Best IAS Coaching, IAS Civil Services Syllabus, Study Material for IAS Exam, IAS Civil Services Exam, UPSC Preparation, Tips for IAS, Material for IAS Preparation, UPSC Exam Material, IAS How to prepare, Other good resources: , IAS preparation tips, How to prepare for IAS 2015,free ias classes, TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "What is Bhima koregaon issue? | Current Affairs-6th Class" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HH4smPm8G5s -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 23619 Brainy IAS
Trade-related Intellectual Property rights
 
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http://www.wto.org/ 11.07.07 Does the TRIPS agreement strike the right balance? The speakers Celine Charveriat, head of Oxfams advocacy office in Geneva and Harvey Bale, Director General of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association discuss whether the TRIPS agreement strikes the right balance between the rights of governments and the rights of patent holders. Each speaker has two minutes to make their case, followed by three and a half minutes of exchange and a 30-second summing up. The moderator is WTO spokesperson Keith Rockwell. More trade debates: http://www.youtube.com/user/WTO#grid/user/F80C09FFF3DCFFD6 More information on Intellectual Property Rights is available on the WTO's website: http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_E/trips_e/trips_e.htm
#54, Intellectual property rights and entrepreneurship
 
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class 11 business studies intellectual property rights (IPR)and entrepreneurship defination intellectual property include 1-patent 2-copyright 3-trademark mind your own business video 54 #commerce #business studies #IPR and entrepreneurship -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- "How to prepare for business exam | Class 12 board exam | preparation |" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaW4qGVoJMw -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 20195 Mind your own business
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY in HINDI
 
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Find the notes of INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY on this link - https://viden.io/knowledge/intellectual-property?utm_campaign=creator_campaign&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=youtube&utm_term=ajaze-khan-1
Views: 107560 LearnEveryone
WTO (Part 3): GATS, TRIMs, TRIPs ; For UPSC and other competitive Exams
 
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WTO (Part 3 ) : General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) , Trade-Related Investment Measures (TRIMs), Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) For UPSC and other competitive exams Subscribe to https://www.youtube.com/c/palpalgk
Views: 44318 palpal GK
What is Intellectual Property Rights? Why Should I Care? By Saurabh Lal in hindi
 
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In this video Mr. Saurabh Lal, a well known Intellectual Property Attorney talks about IPR and why you should pay attention to this? Watch this video if you're looking for... Intellectual Property or IP Intellectual Property Rights or IPR Importance of Intellectual Property Why you need Intellectual Property Rights Importance of Intellectual Property for Business For more important updates and resources, visit http://www.consultease.com/resources Connect with us on facebook, twitter & linked in, to stay up-to-date Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/consultease/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/consultease LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/13181997/ DISCLAIMER ******** This video is mere a general guide meant for learning purposes only. All the instructions, references, content or documents are for educational purposes only and do not constitute a legal advice. We do not accept any liabilities whatsoever for any losses caused directly or indirectly by the use/reliance of any information contained in this video or for any conclusion of the information. Prior to acting upon this video, you're suggested to seek the advice of your financial, legal, tax or professional advisors as to the risks involved may be obtained and necessary due diligence, etc may be done at your end. Category
Views: 72516 ConsultEase
Intellectual Property Rights, Patents and Indian Patent Laws - IPR  [UPSC/SSC/All Government Exam]
 
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Intellectual Property Rights, Patents and Indian Patent Laws - IPR [UPSC/SSC/All Government Exam] Intellectual Property Rights,Patents and Indian Patent Laws - Intellectual property rights IPR & their significance Intellectual property is an intangible property or proprietary asset, which applies to any product of the human intellect that has commercial value. Intellectual Property Rights (I P Rights) are one’s legal rights in respect of the ‘property’ created by one’s mind – such as an invention, or piece of music, or an artistic work, or a name or slogan or symbol, or a design, which is used in commerce, in the form of books, music, computer software, designs, technological know-how, trade symbols, etc. These rights are largely covered by the laws governing Patents, Trademarks, Copyright and Designs. These various laws protect the holder of IP rights from third party encroachment of these rights. It also allows them to exercise various exclusive rights over their intellectual property. Intellectual property laws and enforcement vary widely from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. There are inter-governmental efforts to harmonise them through international treaties such as the 1994 World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs), while other treaties may facilitate registration in more than one jurisdiction at a time. With companies, institutions and individuals constantly forging ahead in newer fields and geographical territories and with path breaking inventions becoming the norm, the field of Intellectual Property Rights has assumed primordial importance, especially in emerging economies like India. UPSC CSE/IAS 2019 Strategy for Prelims & Mains - Sources and Approach Telegram group link:- https://t.me/knowledgehouse2819 Our Facebook page:- https://www.facebook.com/Knowledge-Ho...
Views: 3931 Manvendra's Academy
What is NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK? What does NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK mean?
 
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What is NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK? What does NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK mean? NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK meaning - NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK definition - NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A non-conventional trademark, also known as a nontraditional trademark, is any new type of trademark which does not belong to a pre-existing, conventional category of trade mark, and which is often difficult to register, but which may nevertheless fulfill the essential trademark function of uniquely identifying the commercial origin of products or services. The term is broadly inclusive as it encompasses marks which do not fall into the conventional set of marks (e.g. those consisting of letters, numerals, words, logos, pictures, symbols, or combinations of one or more of these elements), and therefore includes marks based on appearance, shape, sound, smell, taste and texture. Non-conventional trademarks may therefore be visible signs (e.g. colors, shapes, moving images, holograms, positions), or non-visible signs (e.g. sounds, scents, tastes, textures). Certain types of non-conventional trademarks have become more widely accepted in recent times as a result of legislative changes expanding the definition of "trademark". Such developments are the result of international treaties dealing with intellectual property, such as the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, which sets down a standardised, inclusive legal definition. Single colour trademarks, motion trademarks, hologram trademarks, shape trademarks (also known as three-dimensional trademarks or 3D trademarks), and sound trademarks (also known as aural trademarks), are examples of such marks. In the United Kingdom, colours have been granted trademark protection when used in specific, limited contexts such as packaging or marketing. The particular shade of turquoise used on cans of Heinz baked beans can only be used by the H. J. Heinz Company for that product. In another instance, BP claims the right to use green on signs for petrol stations. In a widely disputed move, Cadbury's (confectioners) has been granted "the colour Purple". In the United States, it is possible, in some cases, for color alone to function as a trademark. Originally, color was considered not a valid feature to register a trademark Leshen & Sons Rope Co. v. Broderick & Bascom Rope Co., 201 U.S. 166 (1906). Later, with the passage of the Lanham Act the United States Supreme Court in the case of Qualitex Co. v. Jacobson Products Co., 514 U.S. 159, 165, 115 S.Ct. 1300, 1304, 131 L.Ed.2d 248 (1995) would rule that under the Lanham Act, subject to the usual conditions, a color is registrable as a trademark. The right to exclusive use of a specific color as a trademark on packaging has generally been mixed in U.S. court cases. Specific cases denying color protection include royal blue for ice cream packages (AmBrit Inc. v. Kraft, Inc., 812 F.2d 1531 (11th Cir. 1986), cert. denied, 481 U.S. 1041 (1987)); a series of stripes or multiple colors on candy packages (Life Savers v. Curtiss Candy Co., 82 F.2d 4 (7th Cir. 1950)); green for farm implements (Deere & Co. v. Farmhand Inc. (560 F. Supp. 85 (S.D. Iowa 1982) aff'd, 721 F.2d 253 (8th Cir. 1983)); black for motors (Brunswick Corp. v. British Seagull, Ltd., 35 F.3d 1527 (Fed. Cir.), cert. denied, 115 S. Ct. 1426 (1994)); and the use of red for one half of a soup can (Campbell Soup Co. v. Armour & Co., 175 F. 2d 795 (Court of App. 3d Cir., 1949)). A successful case granting color protection involved the use of the color red for cans of tile mastic Dap Products, Inc. v. Color Tile Mfg., Inc. 821 F. Supp. 488 (S.D. Ohio 1993), and a green-gold color for dry cleaning pads (Qualitex Co. v. Jacobson Products Co., 514 U.S. 159, 165, 115 S.Ct. 1300, 1304, 131 L.Ed.2d 248 (1995)). Although scent trademarks (also known as olfactory trademarks or smell trademarks), are sometimes specifically mentioned in legislative definitions of "trademark", it is often difficult to register such marks if consistent, non-arbitrary and meaningful graphic representations of the marks cannot be produced. This tends to be an issue with all types of non-conventional trademarks, especially in Europe. United States practice is generally more liberal; a trademark for plumeria scent for sewing thread was registered in 1990. In Europe, a written description, with or without a deposited sample, is not sufficient to allow the mark to be registered, whereas such formalities are acceptable in the United States. However, even in the United States "functional" scents that are inherent in the product itself, such as smell for perfume, are not accepted for registration.
Views: 409 The Audiopedia
Theories of Intellectual Property right?
 
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The Vietnam Intellectual Property Law No. 50/2005/QH11 stipulates copyright, copyright-related rights; industrial property rights; rights in plant varieties and for the protection of these rights. This law applies to Vietnamese organizations and individuals, foreign organizations and individuals that satisfy the requirements stipulated in this Law and international treaties to which the Socialist Republic of Vietnam is party of. IP Enforcement in Vietnam https://bit.ly/2VjNb8x Intellectual Properties Rights in Vietnam: https://bit.ly/2GCtu3o Trademark Infringement Vietnam: https://goo.gl/u753CZ
Views: 23 Jennifer Pham
International treaties for protecting intellectual property
 
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International treaties for protecting intellectual property
Views: 2972 btech cse tutorial
Access to Medicines (part III) - Intellectual Property
 
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In this episode of This Week in Global Health, the panel continue the series on Access to Medicines and focus on Intellectual Property issues. For more information or to subscribe to the Show Notes go to www.twigh.org The discussion looks at the World Trade Organization (WTO) trade agreements TRIPS and its affect on access to medicines and treatment in poor countries. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Know how interpret an epidemic curve?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SM4PN7Yg1s -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Intellectual Property Rights | Inside the Issues 5.20
 
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CIGI Senior Fellow Myra J. Tawfik visits the Inside the Issues studio to discuss intellectual property (IP) rights with co-host and Senior Fellow Andrew Thompson. In addition to touching on the basics of intellectual property rights -- what they are and why they are important -- the conversation considers international trade aspects, dispute and enforcement mechanisms, and the future of IP rights. Tawfik also shares information on her project that helps to bring IP law support to start-up organizations. For more on CIGI's International Law Research Program, visit: https://www.cigionline.org/programs/international-law Find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/cigionline http://twitter.com/colonialip
What role for intellectual Property Rights in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership?
 
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SHORT CLIP ALDE spokesperson and shadow rapporteur for EU-US Trade Relations MEP Marietje Schaake cordially invites you to: What role for intellectual Property Rights in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership? A panel discussion on Intellectual Property Right (IPR) provisions in the upcoming EU-US Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Both the EU and the US have expressed their intent to include an IPR chapter in TTIP, though its final scope will be subject of negotiations. Given the vast economic potential of TTIP and the huge volume of trade in goods and services an IPR chapter seems unavoidable. To enable an open and fact-based discussion on the role of IPR in TTIP, she would like to facilitate an open discussion between experts, stakeholders and officials to explore the different aspects of IPR in TTIP. The outcomes of the discussion will provide valuable input for the MEPs and others interested in TTIP.
Views: 340 RenewEurope
Leaving TRIPS behind: Understanding and resisting TRIPS-plus measures
 
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Moderator: Fifa Rahman, Malaysia - Trading out our lives Loon Gangte, ITPC, India - Are there health and human rights concerns in trade deals: a perspective from the Mediterranean Region Mohammed Said Saadi, Economist and Former Minister, Morocco - Negotiating on behalf developing countries Daniel R. Pinto, Counselor, Intellectual Property Division, Brazilian Ministry of Foreign Relations - EU-Mercusor FTA: Impact on Access to Medicines Lorena di Giano, FGEP, Argentina Marcela Fogaca Viera, Brazil - Ukraine - EU Association Agreement Oksana Kashyntseva, National Institute on Intellectual Property Sergey Kondratyuk, the Network - TPP: The peoples resistance (in Spanish with translation) Javier Llamoza, AIS, Peru - Surviving in an Unhealthy TRIPS-Plus World: Options and Recommendations Mohammed El Said, Lancashire Law School, UCLAN, UK
TRIPS Agreement
 
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The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights is an international agreement administered by the World Trade Organization that sets down minimum standards for many forms of intellectual property regulation as applied to nationals of other WTO Members. It was negotiated at the end of the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade in 1994. The TRIPS agreement introduced intellectual property law into the international trading system for the first time and remains the most comprehensive international agreement on intellectual property to date. In 2001, developing countries, concerned that developed countries were insisting on an overly narrow reading of TRIPS, initiated a round of talks that resulted in the Doha Declaration. The Doha declaration is a WTO statement that clarifies the scope of TRIPS, stating for example that TRIPS can and should be interpreted in light of the goal "to promote access to medicines for all." This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 12702 Audiopedia
What is TRIPS AGREEMENT? What does TRIPS AGREEMENT mean? TRIPS AGREEMENT meaning & explanation
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ GET FREE BITCOINS just for surfing the web as you usually do - https://bittubeapp.com/?ref?2JWO9YEAJ ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is TRIPS AGREEMENT? What does TRIPS AGREEMENT mean? TRIPS AGREEMENT meaning - TRIPS AGREEMENT definition - TRIPS AGREEMENT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) is an international agreement administered by the World Trade Organization (WTO) that sets down minimum standards for many forms of intellectual property (IP) regulation as applied to nationals of other WTO Members. It was negotiated at the end of the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) in 1994. The TRIPS agreement introduced intellectual property law into the international trading system for the first time and remains the most comprehensive international agreement on intellectual property to date. In 2001, developing countries, concerned that developed countries were insisting on an overly narrow reading of TRIPS, initiated a round of talks that resulted in the Doha Declaration. The Doha declaration is a WTO statement that clarifies the scope of TRIPS, stating for example that TRIPS can and should be interpreted in light of the goal "to promote access to medicines for all." Specifically, TRIPS requires WTO members to provide copyright rights, covering content producers including performers, producers of sound recordings and broadcasting organizations; geographical indications, including appellations of origin; industrial designs; integrated circuit layout-designs; patents; new plant varieties; trademarks; trade dress; and undisclosed or confidential information. TRIPS also specifies enforcement procedures, remedies, and dispute resolution procedures. Protection and enforcement of all intellectual property rights shall meet the objectives to contribute to the promotion of technological innovation and to the transfer and dissemination of technology, to the mutual advantage of producers and users of technological knowledge and in a manner conducive to social and economic welfare, and to a balance of rights and obligations.
Views: 22400 The Audiopedia
International IP Law: Crash Course Intellectual Property #6
 
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This week, Stan Muller teaches you how intellectual property law functions internationally. Like, between countries. Well, guess what. There's kind of no such thing as international law. But we can talk about treaties. There are a bevy of international treaties that regulate how countries deal with each others' IP. The upside is that this cooperation tends to foster international trade. The downside is, these treaties tend to stifle creativity by making it harder to shorten copyright terms. You win some, you lose some. Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Sandra Aft, Brad Wardell, Christian Ludvigsen, Robert Kunz, Jason, A Saslow, Jacob Ash, Jeffrey Thompson, Jessica Simmons, James Craver, Simun Niclasen, SR Foxley, Roger C. Rocha, Nevin, Spoljaric, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jessica Wode -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 137286 CrashCourse
Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRIPS_Agreement 00:02:08 1 Background and history 00:04:15 2 The requirements of TRIPS 00:07:15 2.1 Access to essential medicines 00:09:00 2.2 Software and business method patents 00:09:42 3 Implementation in developing countries 00:11:37 4 Post-TRIPS expansion 00:13:03 5 Panel reports 00:14:40 6 Criticism 00:18:52 7 See also 00:19:04 7.1 Related treaties and laws 00:19:37 7.2 Related organizations 00:19:52 7.3 Other Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8052394335605246 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) is an international legal agreement between all the member nations of the World Trade Organization (WTO). It sets down minimum standards for the regulation by national governments of many forms of intellectual property (IP) as applied to nationals of other WTO member nations. TRIPS was negotiated at the end of the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) in 1994 and is administered by the WTO. The TRIPS agreement introduced intellectual property law into the international trading system for the first time and remains the most comprehensive international agreement on intellectual property to date. In 2001, developing countries, concerned that developed countries were insisting on an overly narrow reading of TRIPS, initiated a round of talks that resulted in the Doha Declaration. The Doha declaration is a WTO statement that clarifies the scope of TRIPS, stating for example that TRIPS can and should be interpreted in light of the goal "to promote access to medicines for all." Specifically, TRIPS requires WTO members to provide copyright rights, covering content producers including performers, producers of sound recordings and broadcasting organizations; geographical indications, including appellations of origin; industrial designs; integrated circuit layout-designs; patents; new plant varieties; trademarks; trade dress; and undisclosed or confidential information. TRIPS also specifies enforcement procedures, remedies, and dispute resolution procedures. Protection and enforcement of all intellectual property rights shall meet the objectives to contribute to the promotion of technological innovation and to the transfer and dissemination of technology, to the mutual advantage of producers and users of technological knowledge and in a manner conducive to social and economic welfare, and to a balance of rights and obligations.
Views: 14 wikipedia tts
Protection of IP at Trade Fairs
 
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This video discusses how to protect your intellectual property rights (IPR) at trade fairs in China, including the registration and enforcement mechanisms in place. For more info, visit: http://www.stopfakes.gov/china-ipr-webinar/protection-ip-trade-fairs October 11, 2011
Introduction to Intellectual Property: Crash Course IP 1
 
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This week, Stan Muller launches the Crash Course Intellectual Property mini-series. So, what is intellectual property, and why are we teaching it? Well, intellectual property is about ideas and their ownership, and it's basically about the rights of creators to make money from their work. Intellectual property is so pervasive in today's world, we thought you ought to know a little bit about it. We're going to discuss the three major elements of IP: Copyright, Patents, and Trademarks. ALSO, A DISCLAIMER: he views expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect those of the United States Copyright Office, the Library of Congress, or the United States Government. The information in this video is distributed on "As Is" basis, without warranty. While precaution has been taken in the preparation of the video, the author shall not have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by any information contained in the work. This video is intended for educational purposes only and is not intended to be, nor should it be construed as, legal advice. Intellectual property law is notoriously fact specific, and this video (or any other single resource) cannot substitute for expert guidance from qualified legal counsel. To obtain legal guidance relevant to your particular circumstances, you should consult a qualified lawyer properly licensed in your jurisdiction. You can contact your local bar association for assistance in finding such a lawyer in your area. The Magic 8 Ball is a registered Trademark of Mattel Citation 1: Brand, Stewart. Quote from speech given at first Hackers' Conference, 1984 Citation 2: Plato, Phaedrus. 390 BC p. 157 Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly (and have your contributions matched by Patreon through April 30th!) by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Suzanne, Dustin & Owen Mets, Amy Fuller, Simon Francis Max Bild-Enkin, Ines Krueger, King of Conquerors Gareth Mok, Chris Ronderos, Gabriella Mayer, jeicorsair, Tokyo Coquette Boutique, Konradical the nonradical TO: Everyone FROM: Bob You CAN'T be 'Based off' of anything! BASED ON! TO: the world FROM: denial Nou Ani Anquietas. Hic Qua Videum. Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 585185 CrashCourse
Trademark infringement and passing off
 
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Subject:Law Paper: Intellectual property law
Views: 16672 Vidya-mitra
Intellectual Property Rights Part 1
 
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You can be an inventor, a businessperson, a painter, a novelist. Any creative person needs to know the importance of Intellectual Property Rights. This is the first part of the video. We will upload the second and final part soon.
Views: 25921 Abhinit Rai
Marcus Stephen Harris Software And Intellectual Property Attorney (312) 263-0570
 
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Marcus Harris focuses his practice on all aspects of technology law and intellectual property law, including domestic and international trademark prosecution, trademark opinions and counseling, due diligence, copyright and trade secret law. Mr. Harris has extensive experience litigating software and technology related contracts in state and federal courts. He also has extensive experience in transactions involving technology licensing, including software licensing, ERP, SCM and CRM implementations, software development agreements and confidentiality matters. Mr. Harris has extensive legal and related business experience in the technology industry. Prior to forming Marcus Stephen Harris LLC, he spent over 3 years with the Legal/Contracts Department of SAP America where he negotiated hundreds of technology related agreements with SAP's Fortune 500 client base. Mr. Harris was also Senior Corporate Counsel in charge of intellectual property at SSA Global Technologies where he developed and managed an extensive international trademark and patent portfolio, managed intellectual property litigation, conducted intellectual property due diligence and reviewed advertising material to verify compliance with legal requirements. During law school Mr. Harris completed an advanced externship at the United States Copyright Office in Washington D.C. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DfabQYMmjII
TRIPS AND TRIMS ( meaning in hindi ) part 1.
 
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TRIPS AND TRIMS ( Meaning in hindi ) part 1 by R.G.A.D commerce classes.
Views: 3959 deepikaAnoop Mishra
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN INDIA
 
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Find the notes of INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY on this link - https://viden.io/knowledge/intellectual-property?utm_campaign=creator_campaign&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=youtube&utm_term=ajaze-khan-1
Views: 12351 LearnEveryone
Intellectual property rights in India
 
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This video talks about The patent Act, Trade Marks Act, Goods (Registration & Protection) Act, The Copyright Act
Views: 613 learn services
Legal English VV 49 - Intellectual Property Law (1) | Business English Vocabulary
 
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Download this Business English Vocabulary video for legal English: https://www.businessenglishpod.com/category/legal-english/ In this Business English vocabulary lesson we’ll look at English vocabulary related to intellectual property, or IP. Intellectual property includes patents, as well as trademarks and trade secrets. IP may be licensed to others, but it still belongs to the rights holder. We’ll cover activities such as counterfeiting, as well as reverse engineering. And finally, we’ll look at designation of origin.
Theories of Intellectual Property Rights
 
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#NTANETLAW2019 #IPR
Views: 266 Jayareen Classes
Intellectual Property Rights (Introduction)
 
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#NTANETLAW2019 #IPR #TheoriesofIPR #MeaningofIPR Theories of IPR are:- Natural and Labour Reward Incentive Spiritual Economic Natural Monopoly Hope you like the video..!!
Views: 159 Jayareen Classes
Ilan Vertinsky - Health & Intellectual Property Rights: Dynamics of Coordinated Compliance
 
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Ilan Vertinsky explores the ways China interprets its international obligations to support the rights of its people to health and affordable basic medicines. He will discuss the various policies introduced to achieve the affordable medicine objectives and examine their effectiveness. He will then examine the apparent conflict between these objectives and China's obligations under the World Trade Organization agreement, Trade-Related Aspect of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) to protect intellectual property and explore the extent to which China utilizes available TRIPS flexibilities. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of the political economy of the pharmaceutical sector explaining the dynamics of coordinated compliance in the supply of affordable medicines.
Intellectual Property Rights Explained in hindi
 
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Intellectual Property Rights Explained in hindi Hello dosto, aaj is video me mai aapko samjhaunga ki Intellectual property kya hota hai aur intellectual property right kya hota hai. is law ke ander kya kya topic aata hai jaise ki copyright or Patent or Trademark or Industry Design or Geographical Indication etc. ------------------------ What about your opinions? tell me in comment. ------------------------ Follow us on Facebook-https://www.facebook.com/asinformer Follow us on Twitter -https://twitter.com/asinformer Follow us on Instagram-https://www.instagram.com/asinformer Subscribe us-https://www.youtube.com/asinformer Website - http://www.techaj.com/ ------------------------ Thanks for watching my Video , Keep liking and subscribe my channel About : AS Informer channel contains daily tech news, How to guide and review with lot of technology concept. Incoming Terms : intellectual property rights intellectual property intellectual property law intellectual property rights in hindi intellectual property law in hindi intellectual property rights in india
Views: 46997 AS Informer
Intellectual Property Right : Compulsory Licensing in India -I
 
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This lecture is on Pharmaceutical Patenting and Public Health with a special focus on Compulsory Licensing. Objectives: 1.) To understand the issues related with Intellectual Property Rights with respect of Pharmaceutical Patenting and Public Health. 2.) To understand, in particular, compulsory licensing in Pharmaceutical Patenting.
Views: 3892 cec
Introduction to Intellectual Property
 
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This Lecture talks about Introduction to Intellectual Property
Views: 46012 cec
INTELLECUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS TALKSHOW URSB 18TH MAY 2018
 
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According to the world intellectual property organization (WIPO), Intellectual property refers to creations of the mind, such as inventions; literary and artistic works; designs; and symbols, names and images used in commerce. Intellectual property is protected in law by, for example, patents, copyright and trademarks, which enable people to earn recognition or financial benefit from what they invent or create. The Copyright concept came about with the invention of the printing press and with wider literacy. As a legal concept, its origins in Britain were from a reaction to printers' monopolies at the beginning of the 18th century. The English Parliament was concerned about the unregulated copying of books and passed the 1662 licensing of the Press Act, which established a register of licensed books and required a copy to be deposited with the Stationers' Company, essentially continuing the licensing of material that had long been in effect. The first international arrangement on copyright issues was the 1886 Berne Convention which recognized copyrights among sovereign nations, rather than merely bilaterally. Subsequently, the Universal Copyright Convention was drafted in 1952 as another less demanding alternative to the Berne Convention, and ratified by nations such as the Soviet Union and developing nations. Apparently, the regulations of the Berne Convention are incorporated into the World Trade Organization's Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) agreement of 1995, thus giving the Berne Convention effectively near-global application. In 1961, the United International Bureaux for the Protection of Intellectual Property signed the Rome Convention for the Protection of Performers, Producers of Phonograms and Broadcasting Organizations. In 1996, this organization was succeeded by the founding of the World Intellectual Property Organization, which launched the 1996 WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty and the 2002 WIPO Copyright Treaty, which enacted greater restrictions on the use of technology to copy works in the nations that ratified it. Uganda’s Copyright laws are standardized somewhat through these international conventions such as the Berne Convention and Universal Copyright Convention. These multilateral treaties have been ratified by nearly all countries including Uganda. On the other hand, a trademark is a recognizable sign, design, or expression which identifies products or services of a particular source from those of others, although trademarks used to identify services are usually called service marks. As for a patent, it is an exclusive right granted by the government for an invention, which is either a product or process that provides, in general, a new way of doing something, or offers a new technical solution to a problem. The exclusive rights help inventors to prevent others from taking advantage of their ideas/inventions. A patent provides protection for 20 years to an inventor for a new product or process in return for the disclosure of their invention. The Uganda intellectual property laws and rights are provided for under the; The 2004 Uganda Registration Services Bureau Act (Cap. 210) , The Trademarks Act, 2010 , The Copyright and Neighbouring Rights Act, 2006 and The Industrial Property Act, 2014.
Views: 23 Baldwins Karagaba
💡 Industrial Property - Definition - Difference to Intellectual Property #rolfclaessen
 
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Industrial Property - how is it defined? What does it mean? What is it good for? 🔴 Subscribe ► https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=rolfclaessen Thank you! ☺️ #rolfclaessen 🔴 Decsription: What is Industrial Property? And what is the difference between Intellectual Property and Industrial Property? Where is it defined? In the end, I will tell you, why this distinction is important and what important treaties give you what advantages. I am Rolf Claessen, patent attorney and partner with FREISCHEM & PARTNER, and I publish a new video about patents, trademarks and designs every Thursday, and in this video I will tell you, what Industrial Property is all about. Industrial Property basically is a large subset of Intellectual Property. Where Intellectual Property encompasses all creations of the human mind, Industrial Property includes patents, trademarks, industrial designs, utility models, service marks, trade names, and geographical indications. In the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property dated 1883, we find the “official definition” in Article 1 (3): Industrial property shall be understood in the broadest sense and shall apply not only to industry and commerce proper, but likewise to agricultural and extractive industries and to all manufactured or natural products, for example, wines, grain, tobacco leaf, fruit, cattle, minerals, mineral waters, beer, flowers, and flour. This is a definition of 1883 – so the language seems a little outdated. The World Intellectual Property Organization WIPO has a much more timely definition: Industrial property takes a range of forms, the main types of which are outlined here. These include patents for inventions, industrial designs (aesthetic creations related to the appearance of industrial products), trademarks, service marks, layout-designs of integrated circuits, commercial names and designations, geographical indications and protection against unfair competition. In some cases, aspects of an intellectual creation, although present, are less clearly defined. What counts then is that the object of industrial property consists of signs conveying information, in particular to consumers, regarding products and services offered on the market. Protection is directed against unauthorized use of such signs that could mislead consumers, and against misleading practices in general. There is also a very simple but common negative definition of Industrial Property: Industrial Property is Intellectual Property without Copyright. Why is all this important to know? Well, I already mentioned the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property, right? Nearly all industrialized countries are member to this treaty. And it guarantees certain rights to holders of Industrial Property rights, such as patents, trademarks and designs. As an example, you get the priority right, meaning you do not have to file a patent in each and every country of interest when first filing the patent but you have 12 months time to make this decision. You do not have this right for copyrights, because it is not an Industrial Property right which would be governed by the Paris Convention. I hope I was able to explain what Indutrial Property is. If you want to watch more of my videos on patents, trademarks and designs, please subscribe to my channel. Most importantly: protect your intellectual property and go make it count! 🔴 Contact: Dr. Rolf Claessen FREISCHEM & PARTNER Patentanwälte mbB Salierring 47 – 53 50677 Cologne Germany 📞 +49 221 2705770 📠 +49 221 27057710 ✉️ [email protected] https://www.freischem.eu 🔴 Über Rolf Claessen Rolf Claessen ist Patentanwalt und Partner der Kanzlei FREISCHEM & PARTNER in Köln. Die Kanzlei betreut über 6500 Patente und über 4500 Marken. Rolf Claessen betreut die Anmeldung und Durchsetzung von Patenten, Marken und Designs. Das meiste Geschäft macht er mit mittelständischen deutschen Mandanten. Seit einiger Zeit kümmert er sich auch besonders um Fragestellungen rund um Amazon. 🔴 Legalese and Disclaimer You have been watching a video by Rolf Claessen. The views expressed by the participants of this program are their own and do not represent the views of nor are they endorsed by their respective law firms. None of the content should be considered legal advice. This video should not be construed as legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. The contents of this video are intended for general informational purposes only and you are urged to consult your own patent attorney on any specific legal questions. As always, consult a patent attorney.
Views: 455 FREISCHEM & PARTNER
What is NATIONAL TREATMENT? What does NATIONAL TREATMENT mean? NATIONAL TREATMENT meaning
 
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What is NATIONAL TREATMENT? What does NATIONAL TREATMENT mean? NATIONAL TREATMENT meaning - NATIONAL TREATMENT definition - NATIONAL TREATMENT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ National treatment is a principle in international law vital to many treaty regimes. It essentially means treating foreigners and locals equally. Under national treatment, if a state grants a particular right, benefit or privilege to its own citizens, it must also grant those advantages to the citizens of other states while they are in that country. In the context of international agreements, a state must provide equal treatment to those citizens of other states that are participating in the agreement. Imported and locally produced goods should be treated equally — at least after the foreign goods have entered the market. While this is generally viewed as a desirable principle, in custom it conversely means that a state can deprive foreigners of anything of which it deprives its own citizens. An opposing principle calls for an international minimum standard of justice (a sort of basic due process) that would provide a base floor for the protection of rights and of access to judicial process. The conflict between national treatment and minimum standards has mainly played out between industrialized and developing nations, in the context of expropriations. Many developing nations, having the power to take control over the property of their own citizens, wished to exercise it over the property of aliens as well. Though support for national treatment was expressed in several controversial (and legally non-binding) United Nations General Assembly resolutions, the issue of expropriations is almost universally handled through treaties with other states and contracts with private entities, rather than through reliance upon international custom. National treatment only applies once a product, service or item of intellectual property has entered the market. Therefore, charging customs duty on an import is not a violation of national treatment even if locally produced products are not charged an equivalent tax. National treatment is an integral part of many World Trade Organization agreements. Together with the Most-Favoured-Nation principle, national treatment is one of the cornerstones of WTO trade law. It is found in all 3 of the main WTO agreements (GATT, GATS and TRIPS). National treatment is a basic principle of GATT/WTO that prohibits discrimination between imported and domestically produced goods with respect to internal taxation or other government regulation. The principle of national treatment is formulated in Article 3 of the GATT 1947 (and incorporated by reference in GATT 1994); Article 17 of the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS); and in Article 3 of the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). The aim of this trade rule is to prevent internal taxes or other regulations from being used as a substitute for tariff protection. A good summary is found in Japan-Alcohol which states; " national treatment obligation is a general prohibition on the use of internal taxes and other internal regulatory measures so as to afford protection to domestic production".
Views: 1348 The Audiopedia
RPSC AEN MAINS SOCIAL ASPECT OF ENGINEERING LECTURES | CHAPTER 3/Globalization of Economy|
 
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RPSC AEN MAINS SOCIAL ASPECT OF ENGINEERING LECTURES | |AenBird| CHAPTER 3/Globalization of Economy| #1_ON_TRENDING #rpsc##aen# 1.RPSC AEN MAINS | ( |social aspects of Engineering|) | |RPSC AEN MAINS 2018 SOCIAL ASPECT OF ENGINEERING CHAPTER 3 | | Watch previous Lectures from here | | Social Aspect of Engineering Lecture 1 | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6eXwvgRJgFU&t=2s | Social Aspect of Engineering Lecture 2 | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tq61WIsZEco Playlists Social Aspect of Engineering https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNJ364_NfpLVaR1BNnRds8fInpyL-1eHa Technical Lectures CIVIL ENGINEERING https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNJ364_NfpLXYiVfviTWcGgvicakpNzXo #your_subcription_is_our_motivation_subscribe_and_share_for_upcoming_lectures. Chapter 3 syllabus to be cover in this video 1. |Introduction: Globalization of Economy| 2. | World trade Organization (W. T. O.) | 3. | Trade Related Intellectual Property Right (TRIPS) | 4. | Quality Assurance and Quality Control | 5. |ISO Certification| 6. | 5 'S' Theory | 7. | Optimizations of Human ,Capital and Material Resources. | |Do like and Subscribe to our Channel for more updates.| Download Pdf of this lecture From here https://drive.google.com/open?id=10war4UmCb32bOd-7KdtTlyIXWRaJplMD You can Join WhatsApp Group for Suggestions, Discussion and Study Material. https://chat.whatsapp.com/IM3jJ5wyoy19UfFaEIOjvd This is 3rd lecture out of total 15,for |social aspect of engineering.| We have started |Technical Lecture Series| also for |RPSC Aen 2018 mains|
Views: 5024 AenBird
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS EXPLAINED IN HINDI
 
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Find the notes of INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY on this link - https://viden.io/knowledge/intellectual-property?utm_campaign=creator_campaign&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=youtube&utm_term=ajaze-khan-1
Views: 68633 LearnEveryone
IR 5.12.2 Concept Of 'Compulsory License' Under The Patents Act, 1970 || UPSC PREPARATION
 
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What Is The Concept Of 'Compulsory License' Under The Patents Act, 1970? What is a Patent? The Patents Act, 1970 was amended three times in 1999, 2002, 2005 respectively to include the concept of ‘compulsory license’ and these are given in the sections 84-92 of the Indian Patents Act, 1970. A patent is an exclusive right granted for an invention, whether it is a product or a process which gives a new technical solution to a problem, and this patent is granted for a specific period to the inventor. What are ‘compulsory licenses’ under the Patents Act? In simple terms, compulsory licenses are authorizations given to a third-party by the Government to make, use or sell a particular product or use a particular process which has been patented, without the need of the permission of the patent owner. images-3The provisions regarding compulsory licenses are given in the Indian Patents Act, 1970 and in the TRIPS (Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) Agreement at the International level. Although this works against the patent holder, generally compulsory licenses are only considered in certain cases of national emergency, and health crisis. There are certain pre-requisite conditions which need to be fulfilled if the Government wants to grant a compulsory license in favor of someone. Under Indian Patents Act, 1970 the provisions of ‘compulsory license’ are specifically given under Chapter XVI, and the conditions which need to be fulfilled are given is Sections 84-92 of the said Act. India’s first case of granting compulsory license– India’s first case of granting compulsory license was granted by the Patent office in 2012 to an Indian Company called Natco Pharma for the generic production of Bayer Corporation’s Nexavar. All the 3 conditions of Sec 84 was fulfilled that the reasonable requirements of the public were not fulfilled, and that it was not available at an affordable price and that the patented invention was not worked around in Impacts of Compulsory Licensing The areas which will be impacted by compulsory license are as follows:- Innovation – In Underdeveloped countries, the innovation of pharmaceutical companies will be less as they will be dependent on generic drugs. They will prefer getting the compulsory license to a generic drug rather than funding the Research & Development separately, which is often a very costly thing. imagesMoreover, research-based pharmaceutical companies will not launch patent module in the developing countries as there is always the risk of losing the patent, and losing money in research. Competition & Cost- Compulsory licensing will increase the number of companies producing generic medicines. Hence the supply will go up, and the cost will come down. This will also force the innovator countries to introduce differential pricing of their patent module so that they can stand on the market. Patients- Patients will get medicines at a significantly cheaper rate. Also, the big pharmaceutical companies often introduce plans like free access to medicine to protect their patents in the developing countries. Conclusion The patient versus patent issue is one of the most important problems now in the modern healthcare system. Although India has only passed one compulsory license yet, the number of compulsory licenses granted worldwide is on the rise. The underdeveloped and developing countries want to pass compulsory licenses, and the developed, and the big pharmaceutical companies do not want the compulsory licenses to be passed. The main reason the big pharmaceutical companies do not want compulsory licenses to be passed is that it takes a lot of money and effort to create the drugs, and even then there is no certainty. They have to recoup the costs of the innovation. Hence the companies have to fix the cost of their patented module according to the economic status of the country if they want to protect their product from compulsory licensing. India, in particular, faces a challenge, owing to the economic condition of the majority population. On one hand, it has to comply strictly with the international standards of patent protection and on the other hand, it has to safeguard public health. We can say that compulsory licensing has now become the hope for financially challenged patients in underdeveloped countries, and compulsory licensing is now one of the most controversial topics in International Property matters. Source : blog.ipleaders.in
Views: 233 UPSC Preparation
What is intellectual property right? (in Hindi) - Expected Question with Model Answer
 
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बौद्धिक सम्पदा अधिकार किसे कहते हैं? बौद्धिक सम्पदा अधिकारों का वर्णन करें. - संभावित प्रश्नोत्तर - BPSC मुख्य परीक्षा Like | SUBSCRIBE| Share With Friends इन्टरनेट से किताबें यहाँ से लें - https://amzn.to/2JS0YJI हमारा Telegram चैनल - https://t.me/BiharJobs हमारा Whatsapp ग्रुप - https://chat.whatsapp.com/4l7xbmdJ6y1BvWBhZuHhTE ये किताब जरूर से पढ़े: लुसेंट सामान्य ज्ञान (2018 संस्करण): https://amzn.to/2MbI2aS Lucent General Knowledge(2018 Edition): https://amzn.to/2KiwdxT Objective General Knowledge: https://amzn.to/2OyPI8w पूरा Lucent GK विडियो में देखिये COMPLETE Lucent GK Playlist - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLjK6e9lLCFzg-oD5D4XLRBZ8DIgUYCbg अगर आप BPSC / JPSC / सरकारी नौकरिओं की तैयारी कर रहे हैं तो तुरंत हमारा ये चैनल subscribe करिये. हमारे विडियो आपको काफी सहायक होंगे. धन्यवाद What is the intellectual property right? Describe the intellectual property rights. (in Hindi) - Expected Question with Model Answer
Views: 8654 DEFINITE Bihar Jobs
What is CONFUSING SIMILARITY? What does CONFUSING SIMILARITY mean? CONFUSING SIMILARITY meaning
 
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What is CONFUSING SIMILARITY? What does CONFUSING SIMILARITY mean? CONFUSING SIMILARITY meaning - CONFUSING SIMILARITY definition - CONFUSING SIMILARITY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In trademark law, confusing similarity is a test used during the examination process to determine whether a trademark conflicts with another, earlier mark, and also in trademark infringement proceedings to determine whether the use of a mark infringes a registered trademark. In many jurisdictions this test has been superseded by the concepts of similarity and likelihood of confusion, due to the harmonizing effects of the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights. Where mark X is not identical to a registered trademark, the use of mark X may still amount to an infringement if it is "confusingly similar" to the registered trademark. Mark X may share elements of spelling or style that would lead a reasonable observer to believe the trademarks were related. For example, in the computer industry, Microsoft has become such a well known trade name and trade mark that other businesses in the industry may want to use the term "micro" or "soft" in their names. As Microsoft generally does not hold exclusive rights in these terms, it would need to establish that any trade names or trademarks which include these terms is confusingly similar to "Microsoft". The reputation attaching to a trademark is also significant, such that "Microsafe" or "Micro Software", although clearly not identical, could potentially be confusingly similar and amount to an infringement. In addition, the style of a trade mark, such as a logo or font, can become relevant. For example, Microsoft products are distinguished in the marketplace by a consistent font. Competitors may not use the same font on their product, particularly when using a name which would not be confusingly similar except for the use of the font. For example, a brand called "Microsystems" would most likely not be confused with Microsoft. However if Microsystems used the same font as Microsoft, it would be confusingly similar. Some styles, like the script used on Coca-Cola products, are so well known that even a completely different name in a similar script could be held to be confusingly similar. Cases of this type can be proven by using surveys which show that members of the public who are likely to use the services or goods protected by the trade mark have been confused by it. However, courts can also take judicial notice that an infringing mark is confusingly similar if it is obvious to even a casual observer. There are examples of electoral confusion caused by would-be candidates deliberately choosing similar names to confuse the electorate, hence potentially affecting the outcome of an election. For example, in three instances in the United Kingdom during 1994-5: a candidate attempting to stand as a member of the 'Literal Democrat' party (in the UK there is a Liberal Democratic Party), and two instances of candidates standing for the 'Conservatory' party and the 'Conversative' party (against the Conservative Party candidate). All candidatures were rejected by the Returning Officer and the candidates had to stand using more distinguishable party names.
Views: 211 The Audiopedia