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Trade-related Intellectual Property rights
 
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http://www.wto.org/ 11.07.07 Does the TRIPS agreement strike the right balance? The speakers Celine Charveriat, head of Oxfams advocacy office in Geneva and Harvey Bale, Director General of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association discuss whether the TRIPS agreement strikes the right balance between the rights of governments and the rights of patent holders. Each speaker has two minutes to make their case, followed by three and a half minutes of exchange and a 30-second summing up. The moderator is WTO spokesperson Keith Rockwell. More trade debates: http://www.youtube.com/user/WTO#grid/user/F80C09FFF3DCFFD6 More information on Intellectual Property Rights is available on the WTO's website: http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_E/trips_e/trips_e.htm
TRIPS (Trade Related of Intellectual Property Rights) - The Hindu Editorial Decode
 
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TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) video deal with the IAS preparation. TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) would help you in in IAS 2017 exam and IAS 2018 exam. TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) tutorial deals with Patent ,Trips , Trips plus dissected Video by BrainyIAS for IAS Preparation. How to prepare for IAS exam, Best IAS Coaching, IAS Civil Services Syllabus, Study Material for IAS Exam, IAS Civil Services Exam, UPSC Preparation, Tips for IAS, Material for IAS Preparation, UPSC Exam Material, IAS How to prepare, Other good resources: , IAS preparation tips, How to prepare for IAS 2015,free ias classes, TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) TRIPS(Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "What is Bhima koregaon issue? | Current Affairs-6th Class" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HH4smPm8G5s -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 14540 Brainy IAS
Intellectual Property Rights Explained in hindi
 
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Intellectual Property Rights Explained in hindi Hello dosto, aaj is video me mai aapko samjhaunga ki Intellectual property kya hota hai aur intellectual property right kya hota hai. is law ke ander kya kya topic aata hai jaise ki copyright or Patent or Trademark or Industry Design or Geographical Indication etc. ------------------------ What about your opinions? tell me in comment. ------------------------ Follow us on Facebook-https://www.facebook.com/asinformer Follow us on Twitter -https://twitter.com/asinformer Follow us on Instagram-https://www.instagram.com/asinformer Subscribe us-https://www.youtube.com/asinformer Website - http://www.techaj.com/ ------------------------ Thanks for watching my Video , Keep liking and subscribe my channel About : AS Informer channel contains daily tech news, How to guide and review with lot of technology concept. Incoming Terms : intellectual property rights intellectual property intellectual property law intellectual property rights in hindi intellectual property law in hindi intellectual property rights in india
Views: 30009 AS Informer
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY in HINDI
 
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Find the notes of INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY on this link - https://viden.io/knowledge/intellectual-property?utm_campaign=creator_campaign&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=youtube&utm_term=ajaze-khan-1
Views: 66295 LearnEveryone
Intellectual Property Rights, Patents and Indian Patent Laws - IPR  [UPSC/SSC/All Government Exam]
 
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Intellectual Property Rights, Patents and Indian Patent Laws - IPR [UPSC/SSC/All Government Exam] Intellectual Property Rights,Patents and Indian Patent Laws - Intellectual property rights IPR & their significance Intellectual property is an intangible property or proprietary asset, which applies to any product of the human intellect that has commercial value. Intellectual Property Rights (I P Rights) are one’s legal rights in respect of the ‘property’ created by one’s mind – such as an invention, or piece of music, or an artistic work, or a name or slogan or symbol, or a design, which is used in commerce, in the form of books, music, computer software, designs, technological know-how, trade symbols, etc. These rights are largely covered by the laws governing Patents, Trademarks, Copyright and Designs. These various laws protect the holder of IP rights from third party encroachment of these rights. It also allows them to exercise various exclusive rights over their intellectual property. Intellectual property laws and enforcement vary widely from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. There are inter-governmental efforts to harmonise them through international treaties such as the 1994 World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs), while other treaties may facilitate registration in more than one jurisdiction at a time. With companies, institutions and individuals constantly forging ahead in newer fields and geographical territories and with path breaking inventions becoming the norm, the field of Intellectual Property Rights has assumed primordial importance, especially in emerging economies like India. UPSC CSE/IAS 2019 Strategy for Prelims & Mains - Sources and Approach Telegram group link:- https://t.me/knowledgehouse2819 Our Facebook page:- https://www.facebook.com/Knowledge-Ho...
Views: 508 Knowledge House
TRIPS: The Story of How Intellectual Property Became Linked to Trade (1/7)
 
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In this 7 part series, Professor Peter Drahos explains how multinationals from US, Europe, and Japan collaborated to create a global platform for multinationals to privatize knowledge Link to full series http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=832&Itemid=74&jumival=1561
Views: 9278 TheRealNews
Intellectual Property tutorial: How to Gain Rights in a Trademark | quimbee.com
 
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A brief excerpt from Quimbee's tutorial video on how to gain rights in a trademark, such as the "use in commerce" requirement for all trademarks, as well as the issues of distinctiveness and descriptiveness. Watch more at https://www.quimbee.com/courses/13/tutorials/60. This video is just one of five videos in our "Trademark I" tutorial, in which you'll learn the basics of trademark law, including exploring what can function as a trademark, how to obtain one, and the test for trademark infringement. "Trademark I" table of contents: 1. What Can Be Protected? 2. How to Gain Rights in a Trademark 3. Trademark Infringement I 4. Trademark Infringement II 5. Dilution The "Trademark I" tutorial also contains quizzes and a test to gauge your understanding of the concepts discussed in the videos. You can even earn the "Trademark I" merit badge.
Views: 71 Quimbee
Introduction to Intellectual Property: Crash Course IP 1
 
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This week, Stan Muller launches the Crash Course Intellectual Property mini-series. So, what is intellectual property, and why are we teaching it? Well, intellectual property is about ideas and their ownership, and it's basically about the rights of creators to make money from their work. Intellectual property is so pervasive in today's world, we thought you ought to know a little bit about it. We're going to discuss the three major elements of IP: Copyright, Patents, and Trademarks. ALSO, A DISCLAIMER: he views expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect those of the United States Copyright Office, the Library of Congress, or the United States Government. The information in this video is distributed on "As Is" basis, without warranty. While precaution has been taken in the preparation of the video, the author shall not have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by any information contained in the work. This video is intended for educational purposes only and is not intended to be, nor should it be construed as, legal advice. Intellectual property law is notoriously fact specific, and this video (or any other single resource) cannot substitute for expert guidance from qualified legal counsel. To obtain legal guidance relevant to your particular circumstances, you should consult a qualified lawyer properly licensed in your jurisdiction. You can contact your local bar association for assistance in finding such a lawyer in your area. The Magic 8 Ball is a registered Trademark of Mattel Citation 1: Brand, Stewart. Quote from speech given at first Hackers' Conference, 1984 Citation 2: Plato, Phaedrus. 390 BC p. 157 Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly (and have your contributions matched by Patreon through April 30th!) by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Suzanne, Dustin & Owen Mets, Amy Fuller, Simon Francis Max Bild-Enkin, Ines Krueger, King of Conquerors Gareth Mok, Chris Ronderos, Gabriella Mayer, jeicorsair, Tokyo Coquette Boutique, Konradical the nonradical TO: Everyone FROM: Bob You CAN'T be 'Based off' of anything! BASED ON! TO: the world FROM: denial Nou Ani Anquietas. Hic Qua Videum. Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 535573 CrashCourse
What is TRIPS AGREEMENT? What does TRIPS AGREEMENT mean? TRIPS AGREEMENT meaning & explanation
 
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What is TRIPS AGREEMENT? What does TRIPS AGREEMENT mean? TRIPS AGREEMENT meaning - TRIPS AGREEMENT definition - TRIPS AGREEMENT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) is an international agreement administered by the World Trade Organization (WTO) that sets down minimum standards for many forms of intellectual property (IP) regulation as applied to nationals of other WTO Members. It was negotiated at the end of the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) in 1994. The TRIPS agreement introduced intellectual property law into the international trading system for the first time and remains the most comprehensive international agreement on intellectual property to date. In 2001, developing countries, concerned that developed countries were insisting on an overly narrow reading of TRIPS, initiated a round of talks that resulted in the Doha Declaration. The Doha declaration is a WTO statement that clarifies the scope of TRIPS, stating for example that TRIPS can and should be interpreted in light of the goal "to promote access to medicines for all." Specifically, TRIPS requires WTO members to provide copyright rights, covering content producers including performers, producers of sound recordings and broadcasting organizations; geographical indications, including appellations of origin; industrial designs; integrated circuit layout-designs; patents; new plant varieties; trademarks; trade dress; and undisclosed or confidential information. TRIPS also specifies enforcement procedures, remedies, and dispute resolution procedures. Protection and enforcement of all intellectual property rights shall meet the objectives to contribute to the promotion of technological innovation and to the transfer and dissemination of technology, to the mutual advantage of producers and users of technological knowledge and in a manner conducive to social and economic welfare, and to a balance of rights and obligations.
Views: 17353 The Audiopedia
International IP Law: Crash Course Intellectual Property #6
 
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This week, Stan Muller teaches you how intellectual property law functions internationally. Like, between countries. Well, guess what. There's kind of no such thing as international law. But we can talk about treaties. There are a bevy of international treaties that regulate how countries deal with each others' IP. The upside is that this cooperation tends to foster international trade. The downside is, these treaties tend to stifle creativity by making it harder to shorten copyright terms. You win some, you lose some. Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Sandra Aft, Brad Wardell, Christian Ludvigsen, Robert Kunz, Jason, A Saslow, Jacob Ash, Jeffrey Thompson, Jessica Simmons, James Craver, Simun Niclasen, SR Foxley, Roger C. Rocha, Nevin, Spoljaric, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jessica Wode -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 126783 CrashCourse
Legal English VV 49 - Intellectual Property Law (1) | Business English Vocabulary
 
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Download this Business English Vocabulary video for legal English: https://www.businessenglishpod.com/category/legal-english/ In this Business English vocabulary lesson we’ll look at English vocabulary related to intellectual property, or IP. Intellectual property includes patents, as well as trademarks and trade secrets. IP may be licensed to others, but it still belongs to the rights holder. We’ll cover activities such as counterfeiting, as well as reverse engineering. And finally, we’ll look at designation of origin.
Fashion & Intellectual Property
 
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Fashion is a three trillion dollar a year industry with a 100% participation rate. So how do companies like Louis Vuitton, Ralph Lauren, Gucci, and Christian Louboutin promote their brands globally while still protecting their designs? To what extent are creators, from individual fashion designers to million-dollar brands, protected under intellectual property law? How do you balance protecting IP with fostering innovation? Lawyers, law professors, and industry experts discuss the role of intellectual property in the fashion industry, explaining three recent cases that continue to spark debate on design protection in the United States. OFFICIAL SELECTION Seattle Fashion Film Festival -Winner, Best Documentary Madrid International Film Festival 2018 - Nominee for Best Short Documentary - Nominee for Best Director of a Short Documentary Film Miami Fest - Semi-Finalist Aesthetica Short Film Festival Chelsea Fashion Film Festival Fashion Film Festival Chicago DAMN! Film Series Miami Fashion Film Festival Milan Fashion Film Festival Milan Lombardy International Film Festival * * * * * As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker. Featuring: - Leila Amineddoleh, Amineddoleh & Associates LLC https://www.artandiplawfirm.com/member/leila-a-amineddoleh/ - Jura Zibas, Wilson Elser https://www.wilsonelser.com/attorneys/jura_christine_zibas - Lee Sporn, Olshan Frome Wolosky LLP https://www.olshanlaw.com/attorneys-Lee-Sporn.html - Ryan Triplette, Canary Global Strategic https://canaryglobalstrategic.com/ - Howard Deutchman, Meridian Textiles http://meridiantex.com/ - Susan Scafidi, Fordham University School of Law https://www.fordham.edu/info/23380/susan_scafidi - Barbara Kolsun, Cardozo School of Law https://cardozo.yu.edu/directory/barbara-kolsun - Stephen Doniger, Doniger/Burroughs APC http://donigerlawfirm.com/who-we-are/ Related Links: World Intellectual Property Organization Magazine: IP and Business: Intellectual Property in the Fashion Industry http://www.wipo.int/wipo_magazine/en/2005/03/article_0009.html Fortune: Are copyright trolls taking over the fashion industry? http://fortune.com/2015/10/07/patent-trolls-fashion/ Bustle: Fashion Designs Aren’t Protected By Copyright Law, So Knockoffs Thrive As Designers Suffer https://www.bustle.com/articles/4527-fashion-designs-arent-protected-by-copyright-law-so-knockoffs-thrive-as-designers-suffer TED: Johanna Blakley: Lessons From Fashion’s Free Culture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zL2FOrx41N0 CREDITS: Produced by: Samantha Schroeder Written by: Samantha Schroeder, Elizabeth Claeys, Anna Wunderlich Directed by: Matthew Ziegler & Samantha Schroeder Director of Photography/Editor: Matthew Ziegler Line Producer: Alex Yershov Associate Producers: Elizabeth Claeys, Anna Wunderlich, Matt Wood, Daniel T. Richards Second Unit DP: Matt Wood Camera Operators: John Abbott, Alex Li, Andy Reynolds Title Typography: Louise Fili Special Thanks: Refinery Hotel
Views: 52627 The Federalist Society
Union Cabinet approves National IPR Policy
 
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Union Cabinet approves National Intellectual Property Rights Policy, Finance Minister Arun Jaitley says the Policy aims to create awareness about economic, social and cultural benefits of IPRs among all sections of society. ----------------------------------------­------------------------------------- ‘DD News’ is the News Channel of India's Public Service Broadcaster 'Prasar Bharati'. DD News has been successfully discharging its responsibility to give balanced, fair and accurate news without sensationalizing as well as by carrying different shades of opinion. Follow DD News on Twitter (English): https://twitter.com/ddnewslive Twitter (Hindi):https://twitter.com/DDNewsHindi Face Book: https://www.facebook.com/DDNews Visit DD News Website (English): www.ddinews.gov.in Visit DD News Website (Hindi): http://ddinews.gov.in/Hindi/
Views: 2359 DD News
How To Make Money From Your Ideas: A Talk About Intellectual Property
 
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Is your idea safe from your competitors? Do you know about trade secrets? What is intellectual property? Can you make money from your ideas? Jim Haugen and Tom Hendrickson answer all these questions in this VIBE Brown Bag talk on Patents, Trademark, and Copyright. After finishing law school Tom worked for a year and half with Lucas Film Animation as Resource Manager on the “Clone Wars” animated television series. He now practices Intellectual Property Law; works as an adjunct professor at the DigiPen Technical Institute, an animation and game college located in Redmond, WA; and consults with Rigos Professional Education on their bar review program. Film and animation remain a passion, so he writes screenplays and stays current with development in 3d animation, stereoscopic projection and 3d printing. Jim Haugen is the founder of Seattle Patent Group. He has been working with patents since January 2006, and has been a registered practitioner with the United States Patent and Trademark Office since February 2007. During this time, he has done patent prosecution (writing patent applications and responding to office actions from the USPTO to obtain patents), advising clients on strategies to protect intellectual property to ensure optimal intellectual property protection within a given budget, and patent infringement analysis for litigation support. He joined the Washington State Bar Association in 2013.
Views: 281 UW Tacoma Extended
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS EXPLAINED IN HINDI
 
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Find the notes of INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY on this link - https://viden.io/knowledge/intellectual-property?utm_campaign=creator_campaign&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=youtube&utm_term=ajaze-khan-1
Views: 53955 LearnEveryone
360° VIEW II TRIPS & TRIMS II WTO SERIES II ALL DOUBTS DESTROYED
 
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The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Agreement on Trade-Related Investment Measures (TRIMS)
Views: 934 Online GS
Introduction to Intellectual Property
 
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This Lecture talks about Introduction to Intellectual Property
Views: 41120 Cec Ugc
TRIPS Agreement
 
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The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights is an international agreement administered by the World Trade Organization that sets down minimum standards for many forms of intellectual property regulation as applied to nationals of other WTO Members. It was negotiated at the end of the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade in 1994. The TRIPS agreement introduced intellectual property law into the international trading system for the first time and remains the most comprehensive international agreement on intellectual property to date. In 2001, developing countries, concerned that developed countries were insisting on an overly narrow reading of TRIPS, initiated a round of talks that resulted in the Doha Declaration. The Doha declaration is a WTO statement that clarifies the scope of TRIPS, stating for example that TRIPS can and should be interpreted in light of the goal "to promote access to medicines for all." This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 11051 Audiopedia
Intellectual Property Rights Policy , 2016  - Everything you should know About.
 
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on 13th may 2016, Union Government of India Published Intellectual Property Rights policy, This tutorial will enable you understand the history and other details-of the policy it also state various objectives, mission, vision of the government about the law. http://pib.nic.in/newsite/PrintRelease.aspx?relid=145338 This tutorial will enable the viewers to understand everything about the Intellectual Property Rights. Subscribe to the channel Government,India,Telecom,Ministry of Home Affairs,Geospatial,Regulation,Bill,Draft,Loksabha,Rajyasabha,upsc,civil,service,exam,cse,preparation
What role for intellectual Property Rights in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership?
 
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SHORT CLIP ALDE spokesperson and shadow rapporteur for EU-US Trade Relations MEP Marietje Schaake cordially invites you to: What role for intellectual Property Rights in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership? A panel discussion on Intellectual Property Right (IPR) provisions in the upcoming EU-US Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Both the EU and the US have expressed their intent to include an IPR chapter in TTIP, though its final scope will be subject of negotiations. Given the vast economic potential of TTIP and the huge volume of trade in goods and services an IPR chapter seems unavoidable. To enable an open and fact-based discussion on the role of IPR in TTIP, she would like to facilitate an open discussion between experts, stakeholders and officials to explore the different aspects of IPR in TTIP. The outcomes of the discussion will provide valuable input for the MEPs and others interested in TTIP.
Views: 333 ALDEGroup
Intellectual Property Right : Compulsory Licensing in India -I
 
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This lecture is on Pharmaceutical Patenting and Public Health with a special focus on Compulsory Licensing. Objectives: 1.) To understand the issues related with Intellectual Property Rights with respect of Pharmaceutical Patenting and Public Health. 2.) To understand, in particular, compulsory licensing in Pharmaceutical Patenting.
Views: 3487 Cec Ugc
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS in HINDI
 
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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS yaniki bhauhdik sampda hindi me samaj ne ki koshish ki hai
Views: 1518 creative
Intellectual Property Rights | Inside the Issues 5.20
 
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CIGI Senior Fellow Myra J. Tawfik visits the Inside the Issues studio to discuss intellectual property (IP) rights with co-host and Senior Fellow Andrew Thompson. In addition to touching on the basics of intellectual property rights -- what they are and why they are important -- the conversation considers international trade aspects, dispute and enforcement mechanisms, and the future of IP rights. Tawfik also shares information on her project that helps to bring IP law support to start-up organizations. For more on CIGI's International Law Research Program, visit: https://www.cigionline.org/programs/international-law Find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/cigionline http://twitter.com/colonialip
Redrawing Trade Secrets as Powerful Driver of Globalisation: Patent Lawyer India
 
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You can mail us at [email protected] & [email protected] for more details. Grow Wealth & Influence by being part of Transformative Emerging Technologies www.patentbusinessidea.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/patentindiaiplawpritykhastgir/ How to protect TRADE SECRETS in India? The primary goal of “Make in India” initiative was to make India a “Global Manufacturing Hub”. With both multinational companies and domestic companies manufacturing their products within the country, the significance of exports and the manufacturing sector in India has increased considerably. Several measures have been taken to ensure continuous and unending improvement of the Indian IP ecosystem in the country due to the need to extend such to exports for its proper commercialization. Just as other Intellectual Property Rights, Trade Secrets are extremely valuable and sometimes even critical for a company’s growth and survival. Trade secret is a formula, process, device, method, technique or other business information having commercial value. This information is kept confidential and exclusive. Reasonable steps have been taken to maintain its secrecy to get competitive advantage over the competitors. For example, Trade secrets like Coca-Cola's formula for its aerated drinks have been preserved for many decades and is not in the public domain. India has no specific law for the protection of trade secrets. But, Article 39 of Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Agreement to which India is a signatory provides for the specific provision for the protection of undisclosed information. Article 39 of the TRIPS Agreement states that: 1. In the course of ensuring effective protection against unfair competition as provided in Article 10b is of the Paris Convention (1967), Members shall protect undisclosed information in accordance with paragraph 2 and data submitted to governments or governmental agencies in accordance with paragraph 3. 2. Natural and legal persons shall have the possibility of preventing information lawfully within their control from being disclosed to, acquired by, or used by others without their consent in a manner contrary to honest commercial practices (10) so long as such information: (a) is secret in the sense that it is not, as a body or in the precise configuration and assembly of its components, generally known among or readily accessible to persons within the circles that normally deal with the kind of information in question; (b) has commercial value because it is secret; and (c) has been subject to reasonable steps under the circumstances, by the person lawfully in control of the information, to keep it secret. 3. Members, when requiring, as a condition of approving the marketing of pharmaceutical or of agricultural chemical products which utilize new chemical entities, the submission of undisclosed test or other data, the origination of which involves a considerable effort, shall protect such data against unfair commercial use. In addition, Members shall protect such data against disclosure, except where necessary to protect the public, or unless steps are taken to ensure that the data are protected against unfair commercial use. Ask your Patent and Intellectual Property queries by using hashtag #askpatentexpert on twitter. #business #innovation #technology #bigdata #AI #ML #AugmentedReality #VirtualReality #Chatbots
WTO TRIPS amendment: DG Azevêdo
 
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The amendment to the TRIPS Agreement creates a permanent legal pathway for access to affordable medicines for developing and least-developed countries reliant on pharmaceutical imports. In this video statement , Director-General Roberto Azevêdo says that the amendment, the first to any WTO agreement, shows that "the WTO can negotiate smart solutions for real problems affecting people's lives". TRIPS is the WTO agreement dealing with trade-related intellectual property rights, including patents on medicines and other health technologies. The amendment entered into force on 23 January 2017, after two thirds of WTO members accepted the 2005 protocol amending the agreement. Learn more at wto.org/tripshealth -- Director-General Azevedo’s Statement For the WTO, and for me as Director-General, it is a priority to ensure that trade can support development and better livelihoods around the world. This means making sure that trade policies can complement other vital public policy goals, such as environmental policies or public health. Recently, we have marked a very important milestone in those efforts. WTO members have brought into force an amendment to the global agreement which deals with intellectual property rights and trade – known as the TRIPS Agreement. This is the first ever amendment to a multilateral trade agreement in the WTO. And it responds to a public health concern among developing countries. It’s all about access to medicines. Under the old system, the rules restricted the export of generic medicines. So if you couldn't produce the medicines domestically, the rules made it difficult to import them. Now this meant that the poorest could face the biggest hurdles in accessing essential drugs. But now, this matter has been resolved once and for all. This Amendment gives legal certainty that generic medicines can be imported by countries with no pharmaceutical production capacity – or those with limited capacity. And it ensures that those medicines can be imported in satisfactory quantities. And by doing so it helps some of the most vulnerable people who are suffering from diseases such as HIV/ AIDS, tuberculosis or malaria, as well as other epidemics. Clearly, this is a very important enterprise. This right had previously been granted to members but only as a waiver. It was the drive and the leadership of WTO's African members that gave this mechanism a more solid legal grounding. They sought the consensus needed to insert this right permanently into WTO rules, making it a norm, and not an exception. And they were supported by widespread calls for action on this point by various UN bodies. Two thirds of the WTO membership – over 100 countries – have now formally accepted the amendment, and so it has come into force. The next step is for Members to make effective use of the amendment as a practical procurement tool. And this will help to ensure that the supply of medicines match with patient needs. It will also contribute to the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. So I would like to thank all of those involved in making this a reality. It shows that the WTO can negotiate smart solutions for real problems affecting people's lives. We should keep this in mind as we seek to ensure that the benefits of trade are available for everybody, complementing other important priorities, now and in the future.
Law of the Land - Intellectual Property (PUPFIP) Bill, 2008
 
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The Protection and Utilisation of Public Funded Intellectual Property Bill, 2008 Anchor: Amritanshu Rai
Views: 1275 Rajya Sabha TV
Intellectual Property Rights Part 1
 
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You can be an inventor, a businessperson, a painter, a novelist. Any creative person needs to know the importance of Intellectual Property Rights. This is the first part of the video. We will upload the second and final part soon.
Views: 22859 Abhinit Rai
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN INDIA
 
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Find the notes of INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY on this link - https://viden.io/knowledge/intellectual-property?utm_campaign=creator_campaign&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=youtube&utm_term=ajaze-khan-1
Views: 11267 LearnEveryone
What is BERNE THREE-STEP TEST? What does BERNE THREE-STEP TEST mean? BERNE THREE-STEP TEST meaning
 
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What is BERNE THREE-STEP TEST? What does BERNE THREE-STEP TEST mean? BERNE THREE-STEP TEST meaning - BERNE THREE-STEP TEST definition - BERNE THREE-STEP TEST explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ The Berne three-step test is a clause that is included in several international treaties on intellectual property. Signatories of those treaties agree to standardize possible limitations and exceptions to exclusive rights under their respective national copyright laws. The three-step test was first established in relation to the exclusive right of reproduction under Article 9(2) of the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works in 1967. Article 9 of the Berne Convention states that: Right of Reproduction: 1. Generally; 2. Possible exceptions; 3. Sound and visual recordings - (1) Authors of literary and artistic works protected by this Convention shall have the exclusive right of authorizing the reproduction of these works, in any manner or form. (2) It shall be a matter for legislation in the countries of the Union to permit the reproduction of such works in certain special cases, provided that such reproduction does not conflict with a normal exploitation of the work and does not unreasonably prejudice the legitimate interests of the author. (3) Any sound or visual recording shall be considered as a reproduction for the purposes of this Convention. The three-step test in Article 9(2) of the Berne does not apply to copyright exceptions that are implemented under other parts of the Berne convention that have a separate standard, such as those in articles 2(4), 2(7), 2(8), 1 bis, 10, 10 bis and 13(1), or the Berne Appendix. Since then, the three-step test has been modified and transplanted into the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, the WIPO Copyright Treaty (Article 10), the WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty, the EU Computer Programs Directive (Article 6(3)), the EU Database Directive (Article 6(3)), and the EU Copyright Directive (Article 5(5)). The test as included in Article 13 of TRIPs reads: "Members shall confine limitations and exceptions to exclusive rights to certain special cases which do not conflict with a normal exploitation of the work and do not unreasonably prejudice the legitimate interests of the rights holder." The WTO three-step test does not apply to cases where the Berne or Rome Conventions provide separate standards for exceptions, or for rights not covered in the TRIPS Agreement. The technical legal reasoning which has been applied to suggest how this wording should be interpreted is arcane (see the references below). To date, only one case (before a WTO dispute settlement panel, involving U.S. copyright exemptions allowing restaurants, bars and shops to play radio and TV broadcasts without paying licensing fees, passed in 1998 as a rider to the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act) has actually required an interpretation of the test. The three-step test may prove to be extremely important if any nations attempt to reduce the scope of copyright law, because unless the WTO decides that their modifications comply with the test, such states are likely to face trade sanctions. Exceptions to copyright protection are required to be clearly defined and narrow in scope and reach. For instance, the three-step test was invoked as a justification for refusing certain exceptions to copyright wished for by members of the French parliament during the examination of the controversial DADVSI copyright bill. TRIPs Article 30, covering limitations and exemptions to patent law, is also derived from a somewhat different three-step test, that includes "taking account of the legitimate interests of third parties." Exceptions to exclusive patent rights are not subject to this test if they are implemented through Article 31 of the TRIPS, or Articles 6, 40 or 44.2.
Views: 432 The Audiopedia
World Intellectual Property Organisation - WIPO , विश्व बौद्धिक सम्पदा संगठन
 
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PLEASE LIKE SHARE SUBSCRIBE FOLLOW ON - https://www.facebook.com/onlyias.target.5 INDIAN GEOGRAPHY SERIES -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ry2b38dInEc&list=PLS45g3ls5KuppKUtbB8K1AZ_a0N5UUlYc world history series - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_k4cJ6SWKY& list=PLS45g3ls5KupJWPIe6x576bBdYHcy8a3f GROUPS AND BODIES - https://youtu.be/sT0yqvgjyHM MISSION IAS 2019 CURRENT - https://youtu.be/RT2MlIsk2V4 world geography series - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gv8avpX4yt8&list=PLS45g3ls5Kuoy1hsE2CgEkbTtkMuS9-FZ
Views: 467 Only ias Target
TRIPS Agreement
 
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TRIPS Agreement The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights TRIPS is an international agreement administered by the World Trade Organization WTO that sets down minimum standards for many forms of intellectual property IP regulation as applied to nationals of other WTO Members3 It was negotiated at the end of the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade GATT in 1994 The TRIPS agreement introduced intellectual property law into the international trading system for the first time and remains the most comprehensive international agreement on intellectual property to date In 2001, developing countries, concerned that developed countries were insisting on an overly narrow reading of TRIPS, initiated a round of talks that resulted in the Doha Declaration The Doha declaration is a WTO statement that clarifies the scope of TRIPS, stating for example that TRIPS can and should be interpreted in light of the goal "to promote access to medicines for all" Specifically, TRIPS requires WTO members to provide copyright rights, covering content producers including perfo TRIPS Agreement Click for more; https://www.turkaramamotoru.com/en/trips-agreement-24618.html There are excerpts from wikipedia on this article and video
Views: 37 Search Engine
CLP Speaker Series - Lawyering for the Commons: Public Interest & Global Intellectual Property
 
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December 3, 2013 By Adriana Benedict Adriana's research explores the role of public interest lawyering in the field of intellectual property in emerging economies, particularly as impacted by international trade and investment agreements and related arbitration. To begin her research, she is traveling to Brazil to participate in the 2012 Global Congress on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest, where she will be speaking to public interest lawyers from emerging economies about how intellectual property provisions in international trade and investment agreements impact their work. Importantly, Adriana's research will aim to assess the current challenges and opportunities for South-North collaboration in this realm. Adriana is a student fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics. She holds leadership roles with the Universities Allied for Essential Medicines, the Right to Research Coalition, and the Harvard Human Rights Journal, and is a researcher with the HSPH Program on Human Rights in Development. Adriana holds an S.M. (Global Health and Population) from the Harvard School of Public Health, and an A.B. from Harvard College (History and Science, with a secondary field in Government, and a Certificate in Mind, Brain and Behavior). For more information, please visit http://www.law.harvard.edu/programs/plp/
Views: 131 HLS CLP
What is NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK? What does NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK mean?
 
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What is NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK? What does NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK mean? NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK meaning - NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK definition - NON-CONVENTIONAL TRADEMARK explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A non-conventional trademark, also known as a nontraditional trademark, is any new type of trademark which does not belong to a pre-existing, conventional category of trade mark, and which is often difficult to register, but which may nevertheless fulfill the essential trademark function of uniquely identifying the commercial origin of products or services. The term is broadly inclusive as it encompasses marks which do not fall into the conventional set of marks (e.g. those consisting of letters, numerals, words, logos, pictures, symbols, or combinations of one or more of these elements), and therefore includes marks based on appearance, shape, sound, smell, taste and texture. Non-conventional trademarks may therefore be visible signs (e.g. colors, shapes, moving images, holograms, positions), or non-visible signs (e.g. sounds, scents, tastes, textures). Certain types of non-conventional trademarks have become more widely accepted in recent times as a result of legislative changes expanding the definition of "trademark". Such developments are the result of international treaties dealing with intellectual property, such as the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, which sets down a standardised, inclusive legal definition. Single colour trademarks, motion trademarks, hologram trademarks, shape trademarks (also known as three-dimensional trademarks or 3D trademarks), and sound trademarks (also known as aural trademarks), are examples of such marks. In the United Kingdom, colours have been granted trademark protection when used in specific, limited contexts such as packaging or marketing. The particular shade of turquoise used on cans of Heinz baked beans can only be used by the H. J. Heinz Company for that product. In another instance, BP claims the right to use green on signs for petrol stations. In a widely disputed move, Cadbury's (confectioners) has been granted "the colour Purple". In the United States, it is possible, in some cases, for color alone to function as a trademark. Originally, color was considered not a valid feature to register a trademark Leshen & Sons Rope Co. v. Broderick & Bascom Rope Co., 201 U.S. 166 (1906). Later, with the passage of the Lanham Act the United States Supreme Court in the case of Qualitex Co. v. Jacobson Products Co., 514 U.S. 159, 165, 115 S.Ct. 1300, 1304, 131 L.Ed.2d 248 (1995) would rule that under the Lanham Act, subject to the usual conditions, a color is registrable as a trademark. The right to exclusive use of a specific color as a trademark on packaging has generally been mixed in U.S. court cases. Specific cases denying color protection include royal blue for ice cream packages (AmBrit Inc. v. Kraft, Inc., 812 F.2d 1531 (11th Cir. 1986), cert. denied, 481 U.S. 1041 (1987)); a series of stripes or multiple colors on candy packages (Life Savers v. Curtiss Candy Co., 82 F.2d 4 (7th Cir. 1950)); green for farm implements (Deere & Co. v. Farmhand Inc. (560 F. Supp. 85 (S.D. Iowa 1982) aff'd, 721 F.2d 253 (8th Cir. 1983)); black for motors (Brunswick Corp. v. British Seagull, Ltd., 35 F.3d 1527 (Fed. Cir.), cert. denied, 115 S. Ct. 1426 (1994)); and the use of red for one half of a soup can (Campbell Soup Co. v. Armour & Co., 175 F. 2d 795 (Court of App. 3d Cir., 1949)). A successful case granting color protection involved the use of the color red for cans of tile mastic Dap Products, Inc. v. Color Tile Mfg., Inc. 821 F. Supp. 488 (S.D. Ohio 1993), and a green-gold color for dry cleaning pads (Qualitex Co. v. Jacobson Products Co., 514 U.S. 159, 165, 115 S.Ct. 1300, 1304, 131 L.Ed.2d 248 (1995)). Although scent trademarks (also known as olfactory trademarks or smell trademarks), are sometimes specifically mentioned in legislative definitions of "trademark", it is often difficult to register such marks if consistent, non-arbitrary and meaningful graphic representations of the marks cannot be produced. This tends to be an issue with all types of non-conventional trademarks, especially in Europe. United States practice is generally more liberal; a trademark for plumeria scent for sewing thread was registered in 1990. In Europe, a written description, with or without a deposited sample, is not sufficient to allow the mark to be registered, whereas such formalities are acceptable in the United States. However, even in the United States "functional" scents that are inherent in the product itself, such as smell for perfume, are not accepted for registration.
Views: 227 The Audiopedia
Marcus Stephen Harris Software And Intellectual Property Attorney (312) 263-0570
 
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Marcus Harris focuses his practice on all aspects of technology law and intellectual property law, including domestic and international trademark prosecution, trademark opinions and counseling, due diligence, copyright and trade secret law. Mr. Harris has extensive experience litigating software and technology related contracts in state and federal courts. He also has extensive experience in transactions involving technology licensing, including software licensing, ERP, SCM and CRM implementations, software development agreements and confidentiality matters. Mr. Harris has extensive legal and related business experience in the technology industry. Prior to forming Marcus Stephen Harris LLC, he spent over 3 years with the Legal/Contracts Department of SAP America where he negotiated hundreds of technology related agreements with SAP's Fortune 500 client base. Mr. Harris was also Senior Corporate Counsel in charge of intellectual property at SSA Global Technologies where he developed and managed an extensive international trademark and patent portfolio, managed intellectual property litigation, conducted intellectual property due diligence and reviewed advertising material to verify compliance with legal requirements. During law school Mr. Harris completed an advanced externship at the United States Copyright Office in Washington D.C. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DfabQYMmjII
The Patent Office and China:130 Years of Advocacy and Engagement
 
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Speakers: Mark Cohen, Senior Counsel, China, USPTO Elaine Wu, Attorney, Office of Policy and External Affairs, USPTO Learn about USPTO’s China team and the work they do to serve as a resource and leader on Intellectual Property (IP) issues concerning China. Mr. Cohen and Ms. Wu discuss: - The evolution of patent law and the patent office in China; - China’s innovation policies and how they affect the patent system; - Conventional and cutting-edge patent and IP problems that our right holders continue to confront in China and their effect on US right holders; - Various IP dialogues between the US and China and other means to improve the patent protection and enforcement environment in China for the benefit of US rights holders; and - The cooperative bilateral relationship the USPTO China team has formed with the patent office in China to solve these complex issues. About the Speakers Mark Allen Cohen is Senior Counsel, China for the USPTO. Mr. Cohen leads a China team at USPTO consisting of nearly 20 individuals in DC, Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, China on all aspects of USPTO’s activities in greater China. One of his current projects involves setting up a China IPR Resource Center at the USPTO to help support more empirical analysis of China’s IPR environment. In total, he has 30 years private, public sector, in-house and academic experience in China and transition economies, with a principle focus on technology trade and monetizing intellectual property. Throughout his career, Mr. Cohen has worked extensively on realigning public or corporate resources to meet the changing demands of China’s intellectual property environment. Elaine T.L. Wu is an attorney in the Office of Policy and External Affairs at the USPTO. In that capacity, Ms. Wu is responsible for providing legal and technical assistance to foreign governments to assist them in complying with their international intellectual property law obligations, analyzing U.S. legislative proposals and participating in the development and implementation of changes to the patent laws, developing U.S. positions in coordination with other U.S. Government agencies on intellectual property for international multilateral and bilateral agreements, and negotiating various patent law related issues with foreign governments, on behalf of the U.S. government. Ms. Wu has specific expertise and knowledge about the patent, trademark, copyright and enforcement systems in China and Southeast Asia.
Protection of IP at Trade Fairs
 
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This video discusses how to protect your intellectual property rights (IPR) at trade fairs in China, including the registration and enforcement mechanisms in place. For more info, visit: http://www.stopfakes.gov/china-ipr-webinar/protection-ip-trade-fairs October 11, 2011
Introduction to patents and Industrial Property (Antonio Salerno)
 
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Video related to Polimi Open Knowledge (POK) http://www.pok.polimi.it
What is INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY? What does INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY mean? INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY meaning
 
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What is INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY? What does INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY mean? INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY meaning - INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY definition - INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Industrial property takes a range of forms, these include patents for inventions, industrial designs (aesthetic creations related to the appearance of industrial products), trademarks, service marks, layout-designs of integrated circuits, commercial names and designations, geographical indications and protection against unfair competition. In some cases, aspects of an intellectual creation, although present, are less clearly defined. What counts then is that the object of industrial property consists of signs conveying information, in particular to consumers, regarding products and services offered on the market. Protection is directed against unauthorized use of such signs that could mislead consumers, and against misleading practices in general. The broad application of the term “industrial property” is set out in the Paris Convention, Industrial property legislation is part of the wider body of law known as intellectual property (IP) which refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. IP rights protect the interests of innovators and creators by giving them rights over their creations. The Convention Establishing the World Intellectual Property Organization (1967) does not seek to define intellectual property, but lists the following as protected by IP rights:literary, artistic and scientific works; performances of performing artists, phonograms and broadcasts; inventions in all fields of human endeavor; scientific discoveries; industrial designs; trademarks, service marks, and commercial names and designations; protection against unfair competition; “all other rights resulting from intellectual activity in the industrial, scientific, literary or artistic fields”. Countries generally have laws to protect IP for two main reasons: 1. To give statutory expression to the rights of creators and innovators in their creations and innovations, balanced against the public interest in accessing creations and innovations; 2. To promote creativity and innovation, so contributing to economic and social development.
Views: 186 The Audiopedia
What is NATIONAL TREATMENT? What does NATIONAL TREATMENT mean? NATIONAL TREATMENT meaning
 
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What is NATIONAL TREATMENT? What does NATIONAL TREATMENT mean? NATIONAL TREATMENT meaning - NATIONAL TREATMENT definition - NATIONAL TREATMENT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ National treatment is a principle in international law vital to many treaty regimes. It essentially means treating foreigners and locals equally. Under national treatment, if a state grants a particular right, benefit or privilege to its own citizens, it must also grant those advantages to the citizens of other states while they are in that country. In the context of international agreements, a state must provide equal treatment to those citizens of other states that are participating in the agreement. Imported and locally produced goods should be treated equally — at least after the foreign goods have entered the market. While this is generally viewed as a desirable principle, in custom it conversely means that a state can deprive foreigners of anything of which it deprives its own citizens. An opposing principle calls for an international minimum standard of justice (a sort of basic due process) that would provide a base floor for the protection of rights and of access to judicial process. The conflict between national treatment and minimum standards has mainly played out between industrialized and developing nations, in the context of expropriations. Many developing nations, having the power to take control over the property of their own citizens, wished to exercise it over the property of aliens as well. Though support for national treatment was expressed in several controversial (and legally non-binding) United Nations General Assembly resolutions, the issue of expropriations is almost universally handled through treaties with other states and contracts with private entities, rather than through reliance upon international custom. National treatment only applies once a product, service or item of intellectual property has entered the market. Therefore, charging customs duty on an import is not a violation of national treatment even if locally produced products are not charged an equivalent tax. National treatment is an integral part of many World Trade Organization agreements. Together with the Most-Favoured-Nation principle, national treatment is one of the cornerstones of WTO trade law. It is found in all 3 of the main WTO agreements (GATT, GATS and TRIPS). National treatment is a basic principle of GATT/WTO that prohibits discrimination between imported and domestically produced goods with respect to internal taxation or other government regulation. The principle of national treatment is formulated in Article 3 of the GATT 1947 (and incorporated by reference in GATT 1994); Article 17 of the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS); and in Article 3 of the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). The aim of this trade rule is to prevent internal taxes or other regulations from being used as a substitute for tariff protection. A good summary is found in Japan-Alcohol which states; " national treatment obligation is a general prohibition on the use of internal taxes and other internal regulatory measures so as to afford protection to domestic production".
Views: 550 The Audiopedia
Introduction to Intellectual Property and Its Relevance - Part 2
 
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This Lecture talks about Introduction to Intellectual Property and Its Relevance
Views: 4323 Cec Ugc
Intellectual Property RIghts by Mr. Amardev SIngh on 6th Feb 2014
 
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It deals with Intellectual Property Rights and Patents
Views: Nitttrchd

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