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Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 466282 Khan Academy
Why Bond Prices and Yields are Inversely Related
 
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Help us make better videos: http://www.informedtrades.com/donate Trade stocks and bonds with Scottrade, the broker Simit uses: http://bit.ly/scottrade-IT (see our review: http://bit.ly/scottrade-IT2) KEY POINTS 1. Bond prices and bond yields move in opposite directions. When bond prices go up, that means yields are going down; when bond prices go down, this means yields are going up. Mathematically, this is because yield is equal to: annual coupon payments/price paid for bond A decrease in price is thus a decrease in the denominator of the equation, which in turn results in a larger number. 2. Conceptually, the reason for why a decrease in bond price results in an increase bond yields can be understood through an example. a. Suppose a corporation issues a bond to a bondholder for $100, and with a promise of $5 in coupon payments per year. This bond thus has a yield of 5%. ($5/$100 = 5%) b. Suppose the same corporation then issues additional bonds, also for $100 but this time promising $6 in coupon payments for year -- and thus yielding 6%. No rational investor would choose the old bond; instead, they would all purchase the new bond, because it yielded more and was at the same price. As a result, if a holder of the old bonds needed to sell them, he/she would need to do so at a lower price. For instance, if holder of the old bonds was willing to sell it at $83.33, than any prospective buyer would get a bond that earned $5 in coupon payments on an $83.33 payment -- effectively an annual yield of 6% (5/83.33). The yield to maturity could be even higher, since the bond would give the bondholder $100 upon reaching maturity. 3. The longer the duration of the bonds, the more sensitivity there is to interest rate moves. For instance, if interest rates rise in year 3 of a 30 year bond (meaning there are 27 years left until maturity) the price of the bond would fall more than if interest rates rise in year 3 of a 5 year bond. This is because an interest in interest rates reduces the relative appeal of existing coupon payments, and the more coupon payments that are remaining, the more interest rate fluctuations will impact the price of the bond. 4. Lastly, a small note on jargon: when investors or commentators say, "bonds are up," (or down) they are referring to bond prices. "Bonds are up" thus means bond prices are up and yields are down; conversely, "bonds are down" means bond prices are down and yields are up.
Views: 54698 InformedTrades
Relationship between Bond Price & Interest Rate
 
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This video will help you understand the relationship between interest rate and the value of a bond. This video will clear your logic for why is it negative for the bond market when interest rate rises. Why is there an inverse relationship Interest Rate & Bond Price. Please leave us a comment/suggestion on our video and do hit "LIKE" if you like the video. SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL FOR FULL ACCESS TO ALL OUR VIDEOS ABOUT US: Ambition Learning Solutions is a preemptive training institute providing trainings to undergraduates, post graduates and working professionals on various international certification programs like Certified Financial Planner (CFP), Certified Credit Research Analyst (CCRA), Basics of Financial Markets, Macro Economic Indicators impacting the Financial Markets, Derivatives Market, Technical Analysis, Credit Research, Commercial Banking, Investment Banking, Financial Modeling, Advance Excel, Equity Research, Diploma in Banking and Finance (DBF), NSE's Certified Capital Market Professional (NCCMP) etc. We assist corporate by providing qualified human resources for their operation and expansion requirement. We train their existing staff to furnish them with the latest updates and techniques in their respective domains. Reach us at: Website: www.ambitionlearning.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ambitionlearning/ Email: [email protected] Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=67196015&trk=wvmp-profile
Explaining Bond Prices and Bond Yields
 
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​In this revision video we work through some numerical examples of the inverse relationship between the market price of fixed-interest government bonds and the yields on those bonds. ​Government bonds are fixed interest securities. This means that a bond pays a fixed annual interest – this is known as the coupon The coupon (paid in £s, $s, Euros etc.) is fixed but the yield on a bond will vary The yield is effectively the interest rate on a bond. The yield will vary inversely with the market price of a bond 1.When bond prices are rising, the yield will fall 2.When bond prices are falling, the yield will rise - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 29637 tutor2u
How to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity
 
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This video will show you how to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity in a financial calculator. If you need to find the Present value by hand please watch this video :) http://youtu.be/5uAICRPUzsM There are more videos for EXCEL as well Like and subscribe :) Please visit us at http://www.i-hate-math.com Thanks for learning
Views: 264311 I Hate Math Group, Inc
Bond Prices and Interest Rates
 
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How a bond works, how bond prices change inversely with interest rates, and how open market operations by the FED influence interest rates and the economy.
Views: 42891 TheWyvern66
Bond Prices and Interest Rates | Macroeconomics
 
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https://goo.gl/55atY2 for more FREE video tutorials covering Macroeconomics.
Views: 1339 Spoon Feed Me
Bonds and Bond Yields
 
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Bonds and Bond Yields. A video covering Bonds and Bond Yields Instagram @econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 23228 EconplusDal
Bond Price and Bond Yields - Simplified | Money and Banking Part 3.1 | Indian Economy
 
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How to Prepare Indian Economy for UPSC CSE Prelims 2019 ? Video Link : https://youtu.be/SYuTBEMmzJ4 To Join Economy Prelims Telegram Channel - https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYPRELIMS To Join Economy Mains Channel https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYMAINS Economy Previous Year Questions Link : https://drive.google.com/open?id=1zmjyKUMAttVddsQ6wInX1zGBKfy-jU0q Learn complete concept of Indian Economy for CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION in the simplest way. NEO IAS e-learning classes is an online program which aims to create CIVIL SERVANTS for the development of the nation by providing the video series of complete topics that are relevant for the CIVIL SERVICES (IAS/IPS) Exam.
How Interest Rates Affect the Market
 
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Investors should observe the Federal Reserve’s funds rate, which is the cost banks pay to borrow from Federal Reserve banks. What's going on with Japan's interest rates? Read here: http://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/012916/bank-japan-announces-negative-interest-rates.asp?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=youtube_desc_link
Views: 67260 Investopedia
Bond Prices, Interest Rate & Yield Changes
 
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When interest rates go up, bond prices go down. Understanding the relationship between bond prices, interest rate changes and the bond's current yield is important for investors.
Views: 4466 InvestingForMe
PART 2--BOND PRICES VS INTEREST RATES
 
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THIS IS SHORT VIDEO OF ECONOMICS DICTIONARY IN HINDI
Views: 946 Ideal Coaching
Bond Price | Bond Yield | Interest Rate | Inflation | Oil Prices | FDI/FPI | Banks SLR | M K Yadav
 
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Join Telegram to access other notes: https://t.me/currentaffairsmkyadav The video Explains the relationship between Bond Price, Bond Yield, Interest Rate, SLR, Inflation, Oil Prices, FDI/FPI
Views: 2029 MK Yadav - theIAShub
Treasury bond prices and yields | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why yields go down when prices go up. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/annual-interest-varying-with-debt-maturity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 226182 Khan Academy
Bonds & Yields - part 3 (Hindi), Inflation vs Interest rates, बॉन्ड्स और यील्ड - 3
 
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This video explains the relationship between inflation and interest rates along with bond prices and rates. This video explains inflation and its effect on interest earned by investors. यह विडियो महंगाई दर और इंटरेस्ट रेट के बीच के सम्बन्ध को समझाता है, की किस प्रकार से महंगाई दर के बढ़ने और घटने का असर इंटरेस्ट रेट आदि पर पड़ता है.
Views: 6146 Rajiv Dharmadhikari
Khan Academy - Bond Prices and Interest Rates
 
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Khan Academy on Bond Prices and Interest Rates
Views: 147997 Jonathan Horn
Relationship Between Bond Prices and Interest Rates
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rates.
Views: 10791 Practical Money Skills
How to Calculate the Issue Price of a Bond (Semiannual Interest Payments)
 
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This video shows how to calculate the issue price of a bond that pays semiannual interest. The issue price is the sum of: (1) the present value of the face value of the bond, which is to be paid when the bond matures, and (2) the present value of the interest payments. Because the bond pays interest semiannually, the interest rate should be divided by two and the number of periods should be adjusted (e.g., if it is a 10-year bond, there would be 20 periods because interest is paid twice a year). The video provide formulas to calculate the present values and illustrates the computations using an example. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like Edspira on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira To sign up for the newsletter, visit http://Edspira.com/register-for-newsletter Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin
Views: 12542 Edspira
Why Bond Prices Go Down When Interest Rates Go Up
 
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The Ole Captain does what most economists and finance professors can't do, and explains the inverse relationship between bond prices and interest rates to NORMAL PEOPLE. Visit Cappy's other sites for rants, rage, and Super Awesome Economic Genius! http://captaincapitalism.blogspot.com http://aaron-clarey.podomatic.com http://www.assholeconsulting.com
Views: 4268 AaronClarey
Interest rates rise when bond prices fall
 
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Interest rates go up and the price of the bonds go down. A quick illustration to help you understand that concept.
Views: 1430 That Bond Guy
Why Do Bond Prices Fall When Interest Rates Increase?
 
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How changing interest rates impact fixed income funds and ETFs and what to do about it.
Pricing a Bond with Yield To Maturity, Lecture 013, Securities Investment 101, Video 00015
 
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In this lecture, we price the same standard bond given three different ratings agency ratings, which has given us three different required overall yields to get from the bond, given the changing levels of risk. After explaining the theory of present valuing the different fixed cashflows, we then use an Excel spreadsheet to calculate the three different bond prices. The lecture finishes with an Excel chart which displays the relationships between coupon rate, flat yield, and yield to maturity, as well as highlighting the most important concept in bond trading; when required interest rates go up, bond prices go down, and when required interest rates go down, bond prices go up. For those who wish to know how to calculate a yield to maturity given a market bond price, see the next lecture. Previous: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tN32FU3D_k Next: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHR_GSEisRs For financial education from London to Singapore and beyond, please contact MithrilMoney via the following website: http://mithrilmoney.com/ This MithrilMoney lecture was delivered by Andy Duncan, CQF. Please read our disclaimer: http://mithrilmoney.com/disclaimer/
Views: 36304 MithrilMoney
Here’s How Rising Interest Rates Will Affect the Stock, Bond and Housing Markets
 
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The Federal Reserve is looking to hike short-term interest rates for the first time since June 2006. Uncertainty surrounding the timing of higher rates contributed to the unprecedented market jitters seen in stocks over the past few weeks. ‘A rate hike will be good for savers,’ said Brian Rehling, co-head of global fixed income strategy at Wells Fargo (WFC) Investment Institute. ‘Although the benefit is going to be quite small because the Fed’s going to go very slow here.’ Experts expect the Fed’s to initially hike short-term interest rates by just 25 basis points. ‘Investors should hold modest amounts of cash alternatives to meet near-term liquidity needs and emergency expenses,’ he added. TheStreet’s Scott Gamm reports from New York. Subscribe to TheStreetTV on YouTube: http://t.st/TheStreetTV For more content from TheStreet visit: http://thestreet.com Check out all our videos: http://youtube.com/user/TheStreetTV Follow TheStreet on Twitter: http://twitter.com/thestreet Like TheStreet on Facebook: http://facebook.com/TheStreet Follow TheStreet on LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/theStreet Follow TheStreet on Google+: http://plus.google.com/+TheStreet
What Happens to My Bonds When Interest Rates Rise?
 
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With interest rate hikes and indications that there will be further increases this year, we've been receiving questions about the impact of rising interest rates on a bond portfolio. In this video, Pure Financial's Director of Research, Brian Perry, CFP®, CFA® answers the question, "what will happen to my bond portfolio when interest rates rise?" If you would like to schedule a free assessment with one of our CFP® professionals, click here: https://purefinancial.com/lp/free-assessment/ Make sure to subscribe to our channel for more helpful tips and stay tuned for the next episode of “Your Money, Your Wealth.” http://bit.ly/2FDSfK2 Channels & show times: http://yourmoneyyourwealth.com https://purefinancial.com IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: • Investment Advisory and Financial Planning Services are offered through Pure Financial Advisors, Inc. A Registered Investment Advisor. • Pure Financial Advisors Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding specific situations. • Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. • Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. • All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. • Intended for educational purposes only and are not intended as individualized advice or a guarantee that you will achieve a desired result. Before implementing any strategies discussed you should consult your tax and financial advisors.
Introduction to the yield curve | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to the treasury yield curve. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 335542 Khan Academy
Price of treasury bill and interest rate
 
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In this video clip I explain the relationship between the price of a treasury bill and the interest.
Views: 20863 lostmy1
Bond Pricing on the Term Structure of Interest Rates with Expected Inflation Rate Changes
 
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Consider the following spot interest rates for maturities of one, two, three, and four years. Year | Rate 1 | 4% 2 | 5% 3 | 6% 4 | 7% What is the price of a four year, 4 percent coupon bond with a face value of $100? Assume the bond pays an annual coupon. What are our expectations of the yield for a one year bond that starts in one, two, and three years, i.e., what are the forward rates? Suppose the inflation expectations are a constant 2 percent, what are the expected real interest rates for each one year period in the future? Suppose that immediately after purchasing the bond that market expectations of the inflation rate decrease to a constant one percent. What are our new nominal forward rates? Assume expectations of real interest rates have not changed. In one year, what do we expect the new term structure of interest rates to be? In one year, what do we expect the price of the bond to be based on the new term structure of interest rates? What do we expect the holding period return to be if you sell it immediately after receiving the first year’s coupon? Note: There is a typo in calculating the holding period return. The correct formula is (92.22 - 90.17 + 4)/90.17 = 6.7% Note: A pdf of the solution is available from here: https://goo.gl/MeMDkv
Who buys negative-yielding bonds? | FT Markets
 
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Read 'Why bond yields are so low' : http://on.ft.com/2e9kOE0 Negative yielding bonds are bonds which have a negative interest rate. It means that when a person buys those bonds, instead of generating profit, they lose money. Why would anyone buy such bonds then? Some institutions are forced legally, others are betting and hope to make money. ► Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube: http://bit.ly/FTimeSubs For more video content from the Financial Times, visit http://www.FT.com/video Twitter https://twitter.com/ftvideo Facebook https://www.facebook.com/financialtimes
Views: 4404 Financial Times
Bonds, Interest Rates, and the Impact of Inflation
 
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This educational video discusses the basics of bonds. People interested in investing should speak with their financial advisor. The video was produced by Mark Matos, a financial advisor in Naples FL. Blog: http://www.globalwealthconsultants.com/Blog.aspx Follow me on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mark.matos Google+: https://plus.google.com/+MarkMatos1 Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/markamatos Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarkAMatos Music by Chris Zabriskie
Views: 4676 Mark Matos
Mutual Funds and Bond Yields (HINDI)
 
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Mutual Funds and Bond Yields have a correlation with each other. Increase in bond yields results in an increase in interest rates. It is either a result of or results in REPO Rate by RBI. Therefore, bond price decrease and in such a scenario, Short term debt funds deliver best returns. On the contrary, If the bond yield decrease as a result of the cut in Repo Rate, the bond price increase. It leads to higher returns from long term debt mutual funds. An investor can take advantage of this correlation between Mutual Funds and Bond Yields. When the interest rates are increasing, Short term debt mutual funds should be preferred and in case interest rates are decreasing, Long term debt mutual funds deliver superior returns. By investing in debt mutual funds, an investor can generate returns higher than the traditional investment options like fixed deposits or small savings schemes. The only catch is to understand the interest rate cycle to decide on the type of debt mutual fund. If you liked this video, You can "Subscribe" to my YouTube Channel. The link is as follows https://goo.gl/nsh0Oh By subscribing, You can daily watch a new Educational and Informative video in your own Hindi language. For more such interesting and informative content, join me at: Website: http://www.nitinbhatia.in/ T: http://twitter.com/nitinbhatia121 G+: https://plus.google.com/+NitinBhatia #NitinBhatia
Views: 15581 Nitin Bhatia
Bonds | YTM | INTEREST RATES | COUPON | YIELD | HINDI
 
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This video will help in understanding various topics like Bonds, Interest rates, YTM, Coupon Rate, Maturity, Yields, Relation of Interest rates with Bond Price
Views: 12 GeekDonkey
Fiscal Policy: Introduction to Bond Markets and Interest Rate Determination
 
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One of the least understood topics among introductory Econ students is how bond markets work. This video lesson introduces the bond market, and explains how the demand for a government's debt is an important determination of the borrowing costs faced by that government. We will answer some important questions about bond markets, such as, "What's the relationship between bond prices and bond yields?" and "How could budget deficits and debt affect interest rates?" In the next video we'll examine circumstances under which large budget deficits and national debt may NOT drive up a government's borrowing costs. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 11395 Jason Welker
V9. Why do Bond Prices fall when Interest Rates rise?
 
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At first it might appear confusing that bond prices fall when interest rates rise - when properly looked at though this makes a lot of sense. This video clarifies why this is the case.
Views: 8773 savingandinvesting
English: Bond Mathematics: Interest Rates and Price (Inverse Relationship and Sensitivity)
 
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India's Bond markets are largely unknown to the retail investor. This is because they are mostly dominated by institutions like banks, mutual funds and insurance companies. However it must be known that within mutual funds, a large part of the industry AUM is in liquid funds, which invest in money market instruments which are essentially very short term debt papers. In this video we try to understand how bond markets move due to changes in interest rates and what mistakes investors should not be making while taking investing decisions in bonds. To know more about our online trainings, call Shailesh: 8600043130. Please write your comments and feedback so that we can incorporate that in our future videos. Thank you for watching
Excel Finance Class 54: Bonds & Interest Rate Risk
 
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Download Excel workbook http://people.highline.edu/mgirvin/ExcelIsFun.htm Learn Interest Rate Risk: 1. The Longer The Maturity, The More YTM Affects Bond Price 2. The Lower The Coupon Rate, The More YTM Affects Bond Price
Views: 11578 ExcelIsFun
Interest Rates on Discount Bonds
 
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I show how the bond price and the interest rate are inversely related.
Views: 8764 Mike Fladlien
Bonds Effective Interest Method - Discount
 
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This video explains how to calculate a bond that sells at a discount. It shows the corresponding journal entries on the original sale and interest payments. It also shows how to prepare the amortization table and explains what the numbers represent.
Views: 21649 mattfisher64
Rising Interest Rates Bad for Bonds - Everything Investments
 
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Interest Rates Bad for Bonds - Everything Investments Sign up for our newsletter today http://eepurl.com/ES-x5 Find out more about this at our website http://www.everythinginvestments.com When interest rates go up, bond prices fall. The reason for this is because income investors looking to loan money out, wonʼt buy a lower rate bond, if they can purchase one today for a higher rate. The opposite is true for when interest rates fall, this causes investors to pay a higher price for bonds issued out with higher rates, so when interest rates fall, bonds rise in value. Lets use an example, lets say the U.S. Treasury is issuing out bonds at 2% today, this means that for every $100 invested, you are receiving $2 per year until the date of maturity. However if rates rise to 4%, your bond could fall in value 50%, why? Because in order for a new investor to receive the same 4% maturity he will get from a new bond issued, he will need to purchase your bond for $50, giving him $2 a year in interest which is 4% return. It is important to understand this only effects bond traders, if you hold any bond to maturity, assuming the borrow doesnʼt default, you will receive your entire principal plus interest. So as long as you hold a bond to maturity, you wonʼt lose money. However this
Investopedia Video: The Basics Of Bond Duration
 
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Duration tells investors the length of time, in years, that it will take a bond's cash flows to repay the investor the price he or she paid for the bond. A bond's duration also tells investors how much a bond's price might change when interest rates change i.e. how much risk they face from interest rate changes.
Views: 83300 Investopedia
Video No. 2: Bond Prices, Present Value, and Compound Interest
 
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Dan Thornton from D.L. Thornton Economics discusses the negative relationship between bond prices and interest rates, present value, and compound interest.
Views: 14644 Dan Thornton
Bonds & Bond Valuation | Introduction to Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 1
 
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When a corporation or government wishes to borrow money from the public on a long-term basis, it usually does so by issuing or selling debt securities that are generically called bonds. In this section, we describe the various features of corporate bonds and some of the terminology associated with bonds. We then discuss the cash flows associated with a bond and how bonds can be valued using our discounted cash flow procedure. BOND FEATURES AND PRICES As we mentioned in our previous chapter, a bond is normally an interest-only loan, meaning that the borrower will pay the interest every period, but none of the principal will be repaid until the end of the loan. For example, suppose the Beck Corporation wants to borrow $1,000 for 30 years. The interest rate on similar debt issued by similar corporations is 12 percent. Beck will thus pay .12 × $1,000 = $120 in interest every year for 30 years. At the end of 30 years, Beck will repay the $1,000. As this example suggests, a bond is a fairly simple financing arrangement. There is, however, a rich jargon associated with bonds, so we will use this example to define some of the more important terms. In our example, the $120 regular interest payments that Beck promises to make are called the bond’s coupons. Because the coupon is constant and paid every year, the type of bond we are describing is sometimes called a level coupon bond. The amount that will be repaid at the end of the loan is called the bond’s face value, or par value. As in our example, this par value is usually $1,000 for corporate bonds, and a bond that sells for its par value is called a par value bond. Government bonds frequently have much larger face, or par, values. Finally, the annual coupon divided by the face value is called the coupon rate on the bond; in this case, because $120/1,000 = 12%, the bond has a 12 percent coupon rate. The number of years until the face value is paid is called the bond’s time to maturity. A corporate bond will frequently have a maturity of 30 years when it is originally issued, but this varies. Once the bond has been issued, the number of years to maturity declines as time goes by. BOND VALUES AND YIELDS As time passes, interest rates change in the marketplace. The cash flows from a bond, however, stay the same. As a result, the value of the bond will fluctuate. When interest rates rise, the present value of the bond’s remaining cash flows declines, and the bond is worth less. When interest rates fall, the bond is worth more. To determine the value of a bond at a particular point in time, we need to know the number of periods remaining until maturity, the face value, the coupon, and the market interest rate for bonds with similar features. This interest rate required in the market on a bond is called the bond’s yield to maturity (YTM). This rate is sometimes called the bond’s yield for short. Given all this information, we can calculate the present value of the cash flows as an estimate of the bond’s current market value.
FRM: How to value an interest rate swap
 
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At inception, the value of the swap is zero or nearly zero. Subsequently, the value of the swap will differ from zero. Under this approach, we simply treat the swap as two bonds: a fixed-coupon bond and a floating-coupon bond. The value of the swap is difference between the two. For more financial risk videos, visit our website at http://www.bionicturtle.com!
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Negative Interest Rates & Negative Bond Yields
 
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This video provides a market-based rationale for the occurrence of negative interest rates and bond yields. The discussion focuses on the underlying economic dynamics and technical aspects of fixed income investing to identify the specific drivers of negative rates. The presentation gives somewhat different explanations for negative money market rates versus negative yields on intermediate to long-term bonds. The former having to do with the composition of the money supply, and latter defensive moves by bond portfolio managers. InsidersGuideToFinance.com facebook.com/insidersguidetofinance
Is It a Bad Idea to Buy Bonds When Interest Rates Are Going Up?
 
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http://IncredibleRetirement.com 800-393-1017 Here’s something I bet you didn't know. The U.S. stock market, the size of the U.S. stock market is about $30 trillion. If you added up the value of all publicly traded stocks in the U.S., the market value of all those companies would come up to around $30 trillion, but what about bonds? Bonds are hardly ever mentioned or talked about in the financial media, but I bet you might be surprised to discover that the U.S. bond market is actually much bigger than the stock market. The U.S. bond market is estimated to be $40 trillion or more. That's right, the bond market is actually larger than the stock market and yet the financial media has almost all their attention and therefore our attention on the stock market. So what about bonds? Should you be buying bonds when interest rates are going up? You may have heard that when interest rates go up, bond values go down, which is true. Think of a seesaw or a teeter totter, the end that goes up is interest rates and the end that goes down is the underlying value of the bond. Bonds by the way are nothing more than a loan to a company or government or government agency. Typically bonds pay their interest twice a year, every six months, and when the loan comes due, they have a maturity date which could range anywhere from 90 days to 30 years, when you get your money back. If you look at long term returns of investments, let's say 15 year timeframe or longer, then it's no secret stocks have outperformed bonds by a large, large margin; so if stocks do better than bonds over the long term why not just have all of your money in stocks? Well the problem is while stocks tend to deliver nice, long term returns, but the short term oh, that could be a whole other story. Stocks on the short term can be extremely volatile. Just look what happened in the financial crisis of 2008. The S&P 500, the 500 largest publically traded companies in America, lost about 38% in value. So $100,000 in the S&P 500 at the end of 2008 was now worth $62,000. Ouch! That's a lot of short term volatility which tends to make you and I uncomfortable, to say the least. So how do we dampen or minimize that volatility? Imagine you have a sailboat and you have entered it into a race. One way to make your sailboat go faster is to make it lighter. But the lighter the sailboat, the more likely it is to capsize with a gust of wind. To prevent that you add weight or ballast to the sailboat. That slows the speed of the boat down but it reduces the odds of the boat capsizing and sinking. This is how you should think of bonds in your overall investment strategy. They are going to slow down the overall growth of your investment accounts but they are there to keep you from capsizing, to keep you from sinking during short-term periods of market volatility. So the answer to the question should you buy bonds, even when interest rates are going up, as a long term investor, the answer is a qualified yes, and here's what I mean by that. If you buy individual bonds and hold the bond until it matures or is called away early by the issuer then you'll receive the interest and get all your money back when the bond matures. The value of the bond can and will fluctuate while you own it, but it doesn't affect you if you hold it to maturity because then you get all your money back. This is why it's important to own individual bonds, especially in a rising interest rate environment, you don't lose money if you hold the bond until maturity. Why not just use a bond mutual fund? The problem with a bond mutual fund is it doesn't have a maturity date. People are constantly adding or withholding money from the mutual fund itself and typically at the wrong time. In a rising interest rate market, a lot of people in bond mutual funds take some or all of their money out of the mutual fund which forces the mutual fund manager to sell bonds even if they didn't want to. They have to generate the money to pay back the investors and that could drive the value or the price of bonds down even further. Ideally, you want to use individual bonds so you know for sure you get your money back when the bond matures. If you have a small account, and I would say a small account would be $200,000 or less, then you may not have enough money to properly diversify into individual bonds and you may have to still use bond mutual funds and if that's the case in a rising interest rate market you want to focus on short term bond funds or floating rate bond funds. Buying individual bonds as part of your investment strategy will help you move one step closer to experiencing your version of an incredible retirement doing what you want, when you want.
Views: 241 Brian Fricke
3 Minutes! Bond Valuation Explained and How to Value a Bond
 
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OMG wow! Clicked here http://mbabullshit.com I'm shocked how easy, bond valuation video.. What is a Bond? Basically, a bond is a certificate which proves that a company borrowed money from you and now owes you money. Owning a bond is a way to earn interest payments instead of putting your money in a bank. Therefore, if a bond can give you high interest coupon payments compared to bank interest payments, a bond value should be high. On the other hand, if a bond will give you small coupon payments compared to bank interest, the bond value should be low. A bond can be bought either from the original company which issues the bond, or from people who already bought the bond from the corporation, but who want to sell the bond before it expires because they don’t want to wait too long before they get back their original investment So to find the theoretical value of a bond, we need to think about the bond’s interest coupon payments compared to bank interest payments, the bond’s face value, and the length of time before maturity when you get back the full face value of the bond. Sears Bond photo credit: Tom Spree via Wikipedia Creative Commons
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