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History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation in the USA
 
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In 1891, Congress passed the first federal statute governing mine safety. This 1891 law was relatively modest legislation that applied only to mines in U.S. territories, and, among other things, established minimum ventilation requirements at underground coal mines and prohibited operators from employing children under 12 years of age. In 1910, following a decade in which the number of coal mine fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau of Mines as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was charged with the responsibility to conduct research and to reduce accidents in the coal mining industry, but was given no inspection authority until 1941, when Congress empowered federal inspectors to enter mines. In 1947, Congress authorized the formulation of the first code of federal regulations for mine safety. The Federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952 provided for annual inspections in certain underground coal mines, and gave the Bureau limited enforcement authority, including power to issue violation notices and imminent danger withdrawal orders. In 1966, Congress extended coverage of the 1952 Coal Act to all underground coal mines. The first federal statute directly regulating non-coal mines did not appear until the passage of the Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety Act of 1966. The 1966 Act provided for the promulgation of standards, many of which were advisory, and for inspections and investigations; however, its enforcement authority was minimal. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, generally referred to as the Coal Act, was more comprehensive and more stringent than any previous Federal legislation governing the mining industry. The Coal Act included surface as well as underground coal mines within its scope, required two annual inspections of every surface coal mine and four at every underground coal mine, and dramatically increased federal enforcement powers in coal mines. The Coal Act also required monetary penalties for all violations, and established criminal penalties for knowing and willful violations. The safety standards for all coal mines were strengthened, and health standards were adopted. The Coal Act included specific procedures for the development of improved mandatory health and safety standards, and provided compensation for miners who were totally and permanently disabled by the progressive respiratory disease caused by the inhalation of fine coal dust pneumoconiosis or "black lung". Most recently, Congress passed the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act), the legislation which currently governs MSHA's activities. The Mine Act amended the 1969 Coal Act in a number of significant ways, and consolidated all federal health and safety regulations of the mining industry, coal as well as non-coal mining, under a single statutory scheme. The Mine Act strengthened and expanded the rights of miners, and enhanced the protection of miners from retaliation for exercising such rights. Mining fatalities dropped sharply under the Mine Act from 272 in 1977 to 86 in 2000. Additionally, the Mine Act established the independent Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission to provide for independent review of the majority of MSHA's enforcement actions. This was clipped from the 2002 MSHA video, Reflections Mining History, which shows the evolution of health and safety laws and the role of the supervisor. The entire DVD is 11 minutes in length and available from MSHA.
Views: 28422 markdcatlin
Coal Mining: The Disasters and the History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation
 
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A public domain video A film about the history of underground coal mining throughout the years. The disasters and the health regulations. -The Monongah Mining Disaster was the worst mining accident in American history; 362 men and young boys were killed in an underground explosion on December 6, 1907 in Monongah, West Virginia. -Following a decade in which the number of coal mining fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau Of Mines in 1910 as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was to investigate accidents, advise industry, conduct production and safety research, and teach courses in accident prevention, first aid, and mine rescue. However, Congress did not empower the federal inspectors to enter and inspect mines until 1941, and did not authorize a code of federal regulations for mine safety until 1947. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Acts of 1969 and 1977 set greater safety standards for the industry. Where annual mining deaths had numbered more than 1,000 a year in the early part of the 20th century, they decreased to an average of about 500 in the late 1950s. Subscribe - never miss a video! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_S8ZlDCRkMMgc7ciw8X-hg The 20th Century Time Machine takes you back in time to the most important historical events of the past century. Watch documentaries, discussions and real footage of major events that shaped the world we live in today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHAZA5h5cmo
Views: 1932 npatou
Hazards Coal Identification: Mine Health and Safety Council
 
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Training Video on the improvement of barring down practices in underground Coal mine.
Views: 8628 MINE
Farmington Coal Mine Explosion West Virginia November 1968 MSHA
 
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At approximately 5:30 a.m. on Wednesday, November 20, 1968, an explosion occurred in the Consol No.9 Mine, Mountaineer Coal Company, Division of Consolidation Coal Company, Farmington, Marion County, West Virginia. There were 99 miners in the mine when the explosion occurred, 78 of whom died as a result of the explosion. The other 21 miners survived the explosion and escaped to the surface. The mine was sealed at its surface openings on November 30, 1968. Damage to the mine in the explosion area was extensive, requiring loading of rock falls, replacement of ventilation and transportation facilities, and in some cases new mine entries to bypass extensively caved areas. Investigative activities were continued, in cooperation with the Company, State, and United Mine Workers of America (UMW A) organizations, as mine areas were recovered. Between 1969 and 1978, the bodies of 59 victims were recovered and brought to the surface. Recovery operations ceased and all entrances to the mine were permanently sealed in November 1978, leaving 19 victims buried in the mine and leaving some areas of the mine unexplored. Lessons learned during early evaluation of this disaster were incorporated into the Federal Coal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1969. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, generally referred to as the Coal Act, was more comprehensive and more stringent than any previous Federal legislation governing the mining industry. The Coal Act included surface as well as underground coal mines within its scope, required two annual inspections of every surface coal mine and four at every underground coal mine, and dramatically increased federal enforcement powers in coal mines. The Coal Act also required monetary penalties for all violations, and established criminal penalties for knowing and willful violations. The safety standards for all coal mines were strengthened, and health standards were adopted. The Coal Act included specific procedures for the development of improved mandatory health and safety standards, and provided compensation for miners who were totally and permanently disabled by the progressive respiratory disease caused by the inhalation of fine coal dust pneumoconiosis or "black lung". For more on the history of coal mine safety, go to http://www.msha.gov/AboutMSHA.HTM . This was clipped from the 2004 video, We Are ... MSHA, by the Mine Safety and Health Administration and available at the MSHA website and the Internet Archive.
Views: 33609 markdcatlin
Mining Safety Tips
 
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Miners face various types of health risks involving respiratory risks, heat & sun-burns, chemical risks and so on. The video presents various risks and remedies for workers operating in any kind of mine.
Coal mine -Safety indication avoid Accidents 3d character animation in , madurai,india.
 
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Hazards Around Bins And Hoppers 1978 Mine Safety & Health Administration
 
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more at http://quickfound.net "Emphasizes the safety of those who must work around bins and hoppers and acquaints them with the potential hazards of entering these and other material storage areas. Encourages workers to follow the safe and correct operating procedures that apply to their jobs." Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining#Safety Safety has long been a concern in the mining business especially in sub-surface mining. The Courrières mine disaster, Europe's worst mining accident, involved the death of 1,099 miners in Northern France on March 10, 1906. This disaster was surpassed only by the Benxihu Colliery accident in China on April 26, 1942, which killed 1,549 miners. While mining today is substantially safer than it was in previous decades, mining accidents still occur. Government figures indicate that 5,000 Chinese miners die in accidents each year, while other reports have suggested a figure as high as 20,000. Mining accidents continue worldwide, including accidents causing dozens of fatalities at a time such as the 2007 Ulyanovskaya Mine disaster in Russia, the 2009 Heilongjiang mine explosion in China, and the 2010 Upper Big Branch Mine disaster in the United States. Mining ventilation is a significant safety concern for many miners. Poor ventilation inside sub-surface mines causes exposure to harmful gases, heat, and dust, which can cause illness, injury, and death. The concentration of methane and other airborne contaminants underground can generally be controlled by dilution (ventilation), capture before entering the host air stream (methane drainage), or isolation (seals and stoppings). Rock dusts, including coal dust and silicon dust, can cause long-term lung problems including silicosis, asbestosis, and pneumoconiosis (also known as miners lung or black lung disease). A ventilation system is set up to force a stream of air through the working areas of the mine. The air circulation necessary for effective ventilation of a mine is generated by one or more large mine fans, usually located above ground. Air flows in one direction only, making circuits through the mine such that each main work area constantly receives a supply of fresh air. Watering down in coal mines also helps to keep dust levels down: by spraying the machine with water and filtering the dust-laden water with a scrubber fan, miners can successfully trap the dust. Gases in mines can poison the workers or displace the oxygen in the mine, causing asphyxiation... Ignited methane gas is a common source of explosions in coal mines... Miners utilize equipment strong enough to break through extremely hard layers of the Earth's crust. This equipment, combined with the closed work space in which underground miners work, can cause hearing loss... Since mining entails removing dirt and rock from its natural location, thereby creating large empty pits, rooms, and tunnels, cave-ins as well as ground and rock falls are a major concern within mines. Modern techniques for timbering and bracing walls and ceilings within sub-surface mines have reduced the number of fatalities due to cave-ins, but ground falls continue to represent up to 50% of mining fatalities. Even in cases where mine collapses are not instantly fatal, they can trap mine workers deep underground. Cases such as these often lead to high-profile rescue efforts, such as when 33 Chilean miners were trapped deep underground for 69 days in 2010. High temperatures and humidity may result in heat-related illnesses, including heat stroke, which can be fatal. The presence of heavy equipment in confined spaces also poses a risk to miners. To improve the safety of mine workers, modern mines use automation and remote operation including, for example, such equipment as automated loaders and remotely operated rockbreakers. However, despite modern improvements to safety practices, mining remains a dangerous occupation throughout the world...
Views: 4795 Jeff Quitney
Safety First  Mineral Mining
 
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Join DMME inspectors as they tell you tips to stay safe while working on a mine site or quarry.
Views: 3897 VA DMME
Mines Safety & Inspection Act, section 44
 
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A short discussion about section 44 of the Mines Safety & Inspection Act (WA), and what it means in practice. The presentation also discusses section 44 in the context of supervisor obligations for safety and health.
Views: 585 Greg Smith
Mining Equipment Safety Inspections
 
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This mining video focuses on MSHA's standard 14.100. This standard covers: safety defects, examination, correction and records in the work place.
Black Lung Disease Coal Dust Occupational Disease 1980 MSHA
 
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In the last decade, over 10,000 miners have died of coal workers' pneumoconiosis, or what is commonly called black lung disease.1 Black lung disease, which is caused by inhaling coal mine dust, results in scarring of the lungs and emphysema, shortness of breath, disability, and premature death. While the prevalence of black lung disease had decreased by about 90% from 1969 to 1995 following the enactment of the Coal Mine Health and Safety Act, the downward trend of this disease in coal miners has stopped. Since 1995, the prevalence of black lung cases has more than doubled. Many current underground miners (some as young as in their 30s) are developing severe and advanced cases. Identification of advanced cases among miners under age 50 is of particular concern, as they were exposed to coal-mine dust in the years after implementation of the disease prevention measures mandated by the 1969 federal legislation. An increased risk of pneumoconiosis has also been associated with work in certain mining jobs, in smaller mines, in several geographic areas, and among contract miners. For more information, go to the NIOSH Science Blog at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/blog/nsb081808_blacklung.html . This is clipped from the 1980 Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) film, Coal Dust: Hazards and Controls.
Views: 22141 markdcatlin
Mines rule 1955- Safety Committee
 
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Mines rule 1955- Safety Committee
H.R. 5663, Miner Safety and Health Act of 2010: Stanley "Goose" Stewart
 
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Stanley "Goose" Stewart, coal miner in Chickasaw Village, testifies at a hearing about H.R. 5663, Miner Safety and Health Act of 2010 on July 13, 2010.
MSHA 101: Understanding the Mine Act
 
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A webinar from Conn Maciel Carey LLP. Use of this video does not in any manner constitute or establish an attorney-client relationship between Conn Maciel Carey and the viewer. This video may be deemed "attorney advertising" in jurisdictions from which it is accessed. The decision to hire a lawyer is a serious one and should be undertaken after consideration of all relevant information, not only information on this video.
Old exam paper Second class ,subject Mine management  legislation and General safety under CMR, 1957
 
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Old exam paper Second class ,subject Mine management legislation and General safety under CMR, 1957
Lord Robens on coal mining safety.  Archive film 94895
 
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Lord Robens on coal mining safety.
Views: 454 HuntleyFilmArchives
Coal Mines Regulations 2017- Chapter-1 (Definitions)-Part-(1/4)
 
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A descriptive video covering explanations of Coal Mines Regulation 2017. Only for educational purpose. Please like comment and share your views. For any specific query write in the comments section.
Views: 11979 ZEROTOINFINITYY
MSHA Training for Surface Miners
 
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Stay safe on the mine. The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) oversees the provisions of the Federal Mine Safety Act of 1977 (Mine Act) to make sure that safety and health standards are maintained. Whether you’re new, experienced or need refresher training, be in compliance with MSHA requirements based on the Title 30 CFR - Part 46 regulations. Here’s what surface miners and surface mining contractors need to know!
Views: 52051 OSHAcampus.com
Access Your FREE Mining Executive Course Info Kit | Global Training Institute
 
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Gain Instant Access to Your FREE Mining Executive Course Info Tool Kit at http://globaltraining.edu.au/global_training_institute/school-of-civil-construction-and-mining/mining-info/ Global Training Institute Phone: 1800 998 500 | Email: [email protected] | http://globaltraining.edu.au/ Site Senior Executive (SSE) Requirements QLD coal mining legislation requires that anyone wishing to sit the Mines Inspectorate’s SSE Legislation exam must have first completed the risk management competency RIIRIS601A as the pre-requisite, which is awarded on successful completion of this course. As of the 30th June 2011 the Coal Mining Safety and Health Advisory Committee determined that all persons appointed as a site senior executive (SSE) under the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 are required to demonstrate to the Board of Examiners their knowledge of the current Queensland coal mining legislation by undertaking a written examination (“the SSE examination”) before appointment to the role in accordance with section 54(1) of the Act. In addition they must possess a qualification in risk management in either: RIIRIS601A or commonly known as ‘G3’ MINE7033 or GMIRM Holding a Notice from the Board of Examiners of compliance with this requirement is a prerequisite to taking up duties as an SSE. This includes ‘acting’ as a SSE. Also as of the 30th June 2011 all persons appointed to a SSE role must either: Hold a Notice from the Board of Examiners that they have successfully demonstrated to the Board their knowledge of Queensland coal mining legislation by undertaking a written examination on the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 and the Coal Mining Safety and Health Regulation 2001 (“the current legislation”); or On 31 March 2009 the Coal Mining Safety and Health Advisory Committee determined that all persons appointed as a site senior executive (SSE) under the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 are required to demonstrate to the Board of Examiners their knowledge of the current Queensland coal mining legislation by undertaking a written examination (“the SSE examination”) before appointment to the role. From 30 November 2009 all persons appointed to a SSE role must hold a Notice from the Board of Examiners that they have successfully demonstrated to the Board their knowledge of Queensland coal mining legislation by undertaking a written examination on the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 and the Coal Mining Safety and Health Regulation 2001 (“the current legislation”). Holding a Notice from the Board of Examiners of compliance with this requirement is a pre-requisite to taking up duties as an SSE. This includes ‘acting’ as a SSE. http://globaltraining.edu.au/global_training_institute/school-of-civil-construction-and-mining/mining-info/
The Hierachy of Legislation - QCMS&H
 
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www.opencutexaminer.com A short video to discuss/explain the Hierarchy of the Queensland Coal Mining Safety & Health Legislation for people studing their Certificate IV in Surface Coal Mining (OCE) made with ezvid, free download at http://ezvid.com
Mine Safety Minute  Impoundment Tips
 
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Take a minute to learn more about safety at impoundments.
Views: 77 VA DMME
Re-enactment of water truck accident at Blackwater mine 1997
 
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This video includes a re-enactment of a fatal accident which occurred at Blackwater Open Cut Mine on 4 May 1997 when an overtaking light vehicle was crushed beneath a large articulated water truck which was making a right hand turn. Information in the video was current at the date of original production (1998). This was prior to the introduction of the current Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999. For further information about this video or about the Queensland Mine Safety and Health, please visit www.dnrm.qld.gov.au or email [email protected] This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au
Views: 4424 MiningQld
In Memory Of All  Coal Miners
 
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¥T ...and in honour of the 1 man who survived the 2006 Sago coal mine disaster,Randall McCloy.You will see him seated onstage to the right of President Bush in the beginning. On June 15th,2006 President George W.Bush signed into law S. 2803, The MINER Act. Partial text: I appreciate the workers who are here. Thanks for taking time in your day to come. I want to welcome the families of those who mourn the loss of life. We share in your grief, and we honor the memories of your loved ones. I know it's hard. It's really hard for you. But we welcome you here. And we're honored you took time to be here. I appreciate members of my administration who have joined us, as well, today. The hard work of American miners provides us with really important fuel. This economy is growing because of the work of our miners. Coal is an important part of our nation's present and future. Thanks to modern technology and equipment, we've come a long way from the days when a miner would take a canary into the coal mines. Passage -- and since the passage of the Mine Safety and Health Act in '77 -- 1977, America has seen significant decreases of injuries and fatal mining accidents. Yet events in recent months have reminded us that mining is dangerous work. That's what we've seen. This year alone, accidents have taken the lives of 33 miners in our country. Just last month, five miners were killed in a mine explosion in Harlan County, Kentucky. And in January, Americans watched and prayed -- a lot of Americans prayed -- with the people of West Virginia for the 13 miners that were trapped underground by the explosion in the Sago mine. Only one man came out, and he's with us today -- Randal McCloy, and his wife, Anna. And we welcome you all. And we know -- we know, and I hope you know -- that your fallen mining brothers are with us here today in spirit. They're with us today with their loved ones here -- eyes wet with tears, but proud of their accomplishments. We're glad you're here. We honor the memory of all lost miners today; that's what we're doing signing this bill. We make this promise to American miners and their families: We'll do everything possible to prevent mine accidents and make sure you're able to return safely to your loved ones. The bill I'm about to sign is an important part of the effort. The MINER Act will build on the Mine Safety and Health Administration's ongoing efforts to enhance mine safety training, to improve safety and communications technology for miners and provide more emergency supplies of breathable air along escape routes. This new legislation will require mine operators to report any life-threatening accident no later than 15 minutes after they know that one has occurred. And to ensure compliance with the law, the MINER Act will increase the maximum penalty for flagrant violations of mine safety regulations nearly four-fold. To implement this new legislation, we need effective and experienced leadership at the Mine Safety and Health Administration. Last month, I named, or nominated Richard Stickler of the state of West Virginia to be the head of MSHA. He's got experience. He served for six years as the Director of Pennsylvania's Bureau of Deep Mine Safety. He was a miner, mine shift foreman, a superintendent, and a manager, and the Senate needs to confirm Richard Stickler to this key position. America's miners work hard every day to support their families and support this country. It's hard work. You deserve the best training, the best equipment and safeguards that we can provide to protect the lives. And this good legislation I'm signing today is an important part of honoring that commitment. May God bless you all. May God bless our miners and their families, and may God continue to bless our country.
Views: 4000 AuroraKismet
Section 23 of MHSA
 
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A video produced for Rhovan that explains Section 23 of the Mine Health and Safety Act
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 1 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 1 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 7088 Jo
H.R. 5663, Miner Safety and Health Act of 2010
 
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H.R. 5663, Miner Safety and Health Act of 2010 - mars-1:hrs01Ed_W2175_100713 - Rayburn 2175 - Committee on Education and Labor - 2010-07-13 - On Tuesday, July 13, 2010, the Education and Labor Committee will hold a hearing on "H.R. 5663, the Miner Safety and Health Act of 2010." H.R. 5663 will bring our nation's mine health and safety laws up to date, give MSHA the ability to effectively protect miners' lives, hold mine operators accountable for putting their workers in unnecessary danger, and expand protections to all other workers by strengthening OSHA. In April, 29 miners were killed at Massey Energy's Upper Big Branch Mine in Montcoal, West Virginia, the worst coal mine disaster in America in 40 years. In the last decade, more than 600 miners have died while working in our nation's mines. Witnesses: PANEL I: Sec. Joe Main, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health U.S. Department of Labor Washington, D.C.; Sec. David Michaels, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health U.S. Department of Labor Washington, D.C.; Patricia Smith, Solicitor of Labor U.S. Department of Labor Washington, D.C. PANEL II: Larry Grayson, Professor of Mine Engineering Penn State University University Park, Pa.; Lynn Rhinehart, General Counsel AFL-CIO Washington, D.C.; Cecil Roberts, President United Mine Workers of America Triangle, Va.; Jonathan Snare, partner; Morgan Lewis testifying on behalf of the Coalition for Workplace Safety; a group of associations and employers Washington, D.C.; Stanley "Goose" Stewart, coal miner Chickasaw Village W.Va.; Bruce Watzman, Senior Vice President for Regulatory Affairs National Mining Association Washington, D.C. Video provided by U.S. House of Representatives.
Views: 180 HouseResourceOrg
Who or What is an Open Cut Examiner?
 
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Who or what is an Open Cut Examiner? https://www.opencutexaminer.com/who-or-what-is-an-oce/ [email protected] WHO OR WHAT IS AN OPEN CUT EXAMINER? (DEFINITION) An OCE is an ‘experienced coal mine worker’ who has undertaken appropriate study, developed specific operational skills and satisfied the Board of Examiners that they are worthy (have the appropriate knowledge, skills and aptitude) of being granted an Open Cut Examiners Certificate of Competency. The role of an Open Cut Examiner is a statutory role under the Queensland & New South Wales Coal Mining Safety & Health Legislation. Eg QCMS&H Act 1999 – Section 59 Additional requirements for management of surface mines A site senior executive must appoint a person holding an open cut examiner’s certificate of competency to carry out the responsibilities and duties prescribed under a regulation in 1 or more surface mine excavations. The role and responsibilities of an Open Cut Examiner are defined in the Queensland Coal Mining Safety & Health Regulations 2001. This is where the primary or main role/responsibility is found. QCMS&H Regulations 2001 – Chapter 3 – Part 2 Open-cut examiner Section 105 Open-cut examiner’s responsibilities and duties—general (1) The site senior executive must ensure— (a) the main responsibility of an open-cut examiner for the mine is the safety and health of persons in or around the surface excavation during mining activities in or around the surface excavation; and (b) the open-cut examiner’s main duties relate to the main responsibility. (2) Subsection (1)(b) does not prevent the open-cut examiner having other duties at the mine, including, for example, duties given to the examiner under the mine’s safety and health management system. There are a number of additional key responsibilities under the QCMS&H Regulations Chapter 3 – Part 2 Open-cut examiner and further responsibilities that may apply from time to time throughout the Regulations.
Views: 58 Open Cut Examiner
Coal Mine Tour Safety Survey -Univeristy of Kentucky Occupational Medicine
 
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This video features mixed footage from a coal mine safety and occupational health evaluation -Univeristy of Kentucky
Workplace Health and Safety Induction - Occupational Health and Safety Information (OH&S / WHS)
 
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Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) Induction film for work experience and work for dole participants. Provides a comprehensive overview of occupational health and safety protocol and regulations within Australia. OH&S - Health and Safety Induction An Into People Inc. production. http://www.intopeopleinc.org
Views: 111787 Into People Inc
Black Lungs: Hidden Tolls of Coal Mining (Trailer)
 
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Coal makes up 70% of Chinas primary energy consumption and has powered its economic engine for decades. But there are hidden costs behind this dirty fuel, both to human health and to the environment. At least a quarter million Chinese have died from coal mine accidents in China since 1949, according to official statistics. Those who do survive are hardly unscathed. Many suffer from occupational hazards like the fatal black lung disease and maimed limbs. Some estimates put the external environmental cost from coal mining at 7% of Chinas gross domestic product. In short, what consumers pay for electricity and other forms of energy in China is hugely subsidized and does not account for these true, often hideous, costs associated with the complete cycle of coal usage. When miners lungs turn black, it is a grim reminder that coal is much more than just a source of energy. For more info: http://sites.asiasociety.org/chinagreen/feature-black-lungs/
Views: 4163 Asia Society
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 2 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 2 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 2544 Jo
OCE meaning
 
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OCE Meaning www.opencutexaminer.co [email protected] What does OCE mean? Meaning or definition Well, under the Surface Coal Mining Legislation in Australia the OCE meaning is an 'Experienced Surface Coal Mine Worker' who has undertaken appropriate study, developed specific operational skills and satisfied the Board of Examiners that they are worthy (have the appropriate knowledge, skills and aptitude) of being granted an Open Cut Examiners Certificate of Competency. The role of an Open Cut Examiner is a statutory role under the Queensland & New South Wales Coal Mining Safety & Health Legislation
Views: 32 Open Cut Examiner
Safety of mine workers
 
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The search for two miners still trapped underground at Harmony Gold's Kusasalethu mine near Carletonville on Gauteng's West rand continues. About three thousand miners were working when a tremor caused part of the mine to collapse. Joining us to talk about the safety for mine workers underground is Eric Gcilitshana, National Union of Mine Workers Health and Safety Secretary and Bokang Lethala, NUM's regional health & Safety Chairperson working for Harmony Gold's Kusasalethu. For more news, visit: http://www.sabc.co.za/news
Views: 196 SABC Digital News
Part 1 : Safety Parameter Underground Coal Mining | Electrician | Vocational Training | Coal India
 
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CIL Guidelines Safety Factors DGMS Guidelines Vocational Training Safety Factors or Guidelines Underground Coal Mining
BUMA Coal Mining Contractor Indonesia | Site Padaidi
 
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#Mining #Coal # Contractor #BUMA #Indonesian PT Buma Makmur Mandiri Utama Tbk (BUMA) mendapatkan kontrak jasa pertambangan dari anak usaha Petro Energy yakni PT Pada Idi. BUMA merupakan entitas usaha PT Delta Dunia Makmur Tbk (DOID). BUMA diharapkan mulai berproduksi pada lokasi tambang Pada Idi yang terletak di Kabupaten Barito Utama, Kalimantan Tengah, pada kuartal IV 2017. Kontrak jangka panjang ini diharapkan dapat memberikan kontribusi lebih dari 200 juta bcm. Coal mining, coal mining adalah, coal mining company, coal mining indonesia, coal mining logo, coal mining process, coal mining methods, coal mining price, coal mining vector, coal mining artinya, coal mining powerpoint template free, coal mining company in indonesia, coal mining indonesia 2018, coal mining wallpaper, coal mining article, coal mining in china, coal mining site, coal mining exploration, coal mining ppt, coal mining in kalimantan, coal mining company profile pdf, coal mining activity, coal mining animation, coal mining australia, coal mining activities, coal mining australia companies, coal mining articles, coal mining australia salary, coal mining areas in south africa, coal mining accidents, coal mining area, coal mining accidents statistics, coal mining air pollution, coal mining advantages, american coal mining, coal mining and trump, coal mining and environmental impact, coal mining alaska, coal mining and pollution, coal mining business process, coal mining bdo, coal mining blasting, coal mining blues, coal mining book pdf, coal mining books pdf, coal mining business plan pdf, coal mining business plan sample, coal mining business, coal mining blues lyrics matt andersen, coal mining bitcoin, coal mining blue mountains, coal mining brazil, coal mining boots, coal mining boots wholesale, coal mining blues chords, coal mining blues lyrics, coal mining books, coal mining belt, coal mining buffer report, coal mining cycle, coal mining company in australia, coal mining companies in indonesia, coal mining company profile, coal mining contractors in indonesia, coal mining cartoon, coal mining contractor, coal mining companies, coal mining company in china, coal mining conditions, coal mining company in malaysia, coal mining cost, coal mining contractor indonesia, coal mining companies in vietnam, coal mining companies in south africa, coal mining canada, coal mining china, coal mining disadvantages, coal mining deforestation, coal mining deaths per year worldwide, coal mining dangers, coal mining definition, coal mining diseases, coal mining dump trucks, coal mining directory, coal mining development, coal mining deaths, coal mining disasters, coal mining during the industrial revolution, coal mining deaths per year, coal mining documentary, coal mining deaths 2016, coal mining documentary netflix, coal mining deaths pennsylvania, coal mining deaths uk, coal mining documentary west virginia, coal mining disasters uk, coal mining environmental impact, coal mining engineering colleges, coal mining equipment, coal mining effects, coal mining equipment list, coal mining effects on environment, coal mining environmental impacts, coal mining equipments, coal mining effects on health, coal mining europe, coal mining environmental effects, coal mining environment, coal mining explosions, coal mining environmental issues, coal mining economics, coal mining economic development and the natural resources curse, coal mining environmental, coal mining employment by year, coal mining employment, coal mining financial model, coal mining financial model xls, coal mining flowchart, coal mining for dummies, coal mining f2p, coal mining future, coal mining frostpunk, coal mining for sale, coal mining feasibility study report, coal mining free images, coal mining facts, coal mining facts uk, coal mining fatalities 2017, coal mining fatalities, coal mining films, coal mining f2p osrs, coal mining france, coal mining forum, coal mining figurines, coal mining fire pennsylvania, coal mining germany, coal mining gif, coal mining gifts, coal mining gear, coal mining game, coal mining great barrier reef, coal mining growth, coal mining glossary, coal mining georgia, coal mining global warming, coal mining glasgow, coal mining great britain, coal mining guide runescape, coal mining gas, coal mining greece, coal mining gazetteer, coal mining goaf, coal mining greenhouse gas emissions, coal mining gov.uk, coal mining ground control by peng pdf, coal mining headlamp, coal mining handbook pdf, coal mining hazards, coal mining history, coal mining health and safety act, coal mining health effects, coal mining harmful effects, coal mining heavy metals, coal mining health and safety, coal mining history resource centre, coal mining health risks, coal mining hard hats, coal mining heritage park, coal mining house decor, coal mining hunter valley, coal mining history resource centre co uk, coal mining history research centre, coal mining history uk, coal mining healt
Views: 138 Omoshiroi Project
DANGEROUS AND SAFE PRACTICES IN BITUMINOUS COAL MINING
 
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Consists of unedited scenes of coal mine accidents and their prevention. The types of accidents shown deal mostly with mine railroads and coal digging, and result from carelessness with equipment, improper digging methods, and failure to use safety devices and precautions. Date: 1934 - 1975 Creators: Department of the Interior. Bureau of Mines. Pittsburgh Experiment Station. 1934-1/19/1975 (Most Recent) From: Series: Public Information Films and Video Recordings, 1934 1860 - 1975 1995 Record Group 70: Records of the U.S. Bureau of Mines, 1860 - 1995 localIdentifier: 70.46 naId: 12396 More at http://www.FLYKVNY.com
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 5 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 5 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 1757 Jo
1513. Trip to Hyden (Tom T. Hall cover)
 
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The Hurricane Creek mine disaster occurred on December 30, 1970, exactly one year after the Coal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1969 was passed. It was the most deadly mine disaster in the United States since the Farmington MIne disaster in 1968. The mine was owned by Charles and Stanley Finley, who had opened it the previous March, though their company had been mining in the area for ten years. The small operation involved about 170 non-unionised employees. Thirty-four infractions were reported in its first three months of operation, but they had been fixed, and the mine had been shut down for three days in June due to safety concerns. The Bureau of Mines had declared the mine an "imminent danger" due to blasting safety hazards in November, 1970, but had allowed the mine to continue operation. The hazards, including excess accumulation of coal dust and electrical spark hazards, were discovered on November 19 and ordered to be cleaned up by December 22, but, due to a shortage of inspectors, the agency could not reinspect on that date, as required by law. The bureau could have declared the mine "excessively hazardous" and conducted inspections every ten days, but they chose not to do so, despite the fact that the mine owners had been deemed responsible for the crushing death of a worker on November 9 as they had failed to make required repairs to an underground tractor involved in the accident. This lack of enforcement of the new mining safety law was part of a wider problem which had led to strikes by union miners that summer. The understaffed agency had, at the time of the Hurricane Creek disaster, failed to issue a single fine, despite citing thousands of safety violations at dozens of coal mines. The explosion occurred just after midday. The bodies were removed within 24 hours and the mine was sealed until an investigation could begin. There was only one, A.T. Collins, who was reentering the shaft after a lunch break and was blown out of the mine by the explosion. He was one of three miners who testified to the presence at the site of primer cord, an illegal fuse. The bodies were taken to a school gymnasium in Hyden, many so damaged in the blast that they could only be identified by social security numbers written on their belts. Most of the miners came from Clay and Leslie County counties, two of the poorest in the state. "Trip to Hyden" by Tom T. Hall, noted for his story-telling skills, is one of a number of songs written about the disaster. You can see a playlist of my mining songs here: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=CF909DA14CE415DF Lyrics and chords of this song can be found here: http://raymondfolk.wikifoundry.com/page/Trip+to+Hyden+%28Tom+T.+Hall%29 For lyrics and chords of all my songs, please see my website: http://raymondfolk.wikifoundry.com
Views: 1367 raymondcrooke
Contributions of the American Miner
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration Contributions of the American Miner DVD508 - 2004 *2004 Communicator Award Winner* Every day, materials merge from American surface and underground coal and metal/nonmetal mines. Mining provides minerals and fuels that enable our nation to work and produce items that we use every day. This video shows a wide variety of mining processes and the products that are produced from them. This is a great tribute to the hardworking men and women of our Nation's mines.
Views: 9806 PublicResourceOrg
Mine Safety Solutions
 
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Defender Elite - Safety Gloves
Views: 824 Anthony Gilin
MSHA: 7 Killed in Blast Were Leaving W.Va. Mine
 
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Mine safety officials say the seven miners killed inside a West Virginia coal mine were leaving the site in a vehicle when an explosion occurred. The Mine Safety and Health Administration says 19 others are still unaccounted for. (April 5)
Views: 2580 Associated Press
Coal Mines Regulations CMR-1957
 
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CMR 1957
Views: 289 dipunosmee
Investigating the Health of Appalachian Coal Miners (1920- 1975)
 
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produced by Ziwei Zhao and Erin Naziri
Views: 59 Erin Naziri
Explosives Underground -- Handling Explosives in Modern Mines
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration Explosives Underground -- Handling Explosives in Modern Mines DVD531 - 1999 - NIOSH This video emphasizes safety standards for the handling and transportation of explosive materials from surface to underground magazines. It shows underground storage of explosives, inspecting vehicles required to transport explosives underground, examining work places and scaling procedures, and loading and detonating explosives. It also includes staged safety violations and a review of an underground blasting accident.
Views: 33507 PublicResourceOrg
RIIRIS601 | G3 Course Establish and Maintain Risk Management System | Global Training Institute
 
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To Access Your FREE Career Planning Kit visit http://www.globaltraining.edu.au To Gain INSTANT Access to your FREE Qualification Information Pack, visit http://bit.ly/1KQQiIE Global Training Institute | G3 Course Establish and Maintain Risk Management Systems Phone: 1800 998 500 | Email: [email protected] | http://globaltraining.edu.au/ As of 01 January 2012, the unit RIIRIS601A Establish and Maintain the Risk Management System (commonly known as G3 Mining Course) is a prerequisite competency to be appointed as a Site Senior Executive in Mining as defined in the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 and as required by the Coal Mining Safety and Health Advisory Council in Australia. If you are a part of the mining industry and need to complete the G3 course, we would love to help you do this! Global Training Institute | G3 Course Establish and Maintain Risk Management Systems http://bit.ly/1DVJ3ei Author: Anne Botting
TRAINING ON MINES SAFETY
 
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Mining comprises of hazardous operations and requires specific Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) to protect the entire body from any harm or injury in the mining environment. Using PPEs requires hazard awareness and training. "Training on Mines Safety" is a short video on one of the the intensive training workshops provided by Code of Responsible Extraction (CORE) team.
Views: 149 Solidaridad Asia

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