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Economic Growth in the Gilded Age — US Economic History 5
 
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In the Gilded Age (the 1870s and 1880s), the US economy grew faster than ever. Video created with the Bill of Rights Institute to help students ace their exams. This is the fifth video in a series of nine with Professor Brian Domitrovic, which aim to be a resource for students studying for US History exams and to provide a survey of different (and sometimes opposing) viewpoints on key episodes in U.S. economic history. SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: Regulating Monopolies: A History of Electricity Regulation - Learn Liberty (video): Professor Lynne Kiesling explains the motivations behind regulating Gilded Age monopolies and the results of those regulations. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=430OAJuh0nk The robber barons weren’t robbers. Here’s why. (blog post): Lawrence Reed argues that Standard Oil shouldn’t be seen as an argument against free markets, but an argument for them. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/the-robber-barons-werent-robbers-heres-why/ How Capitalism Freed Victorian Women - Learn Liberty (video): Dr. Thaddeus Russell explains how the booming economy of the Gilded Age allowed women to find their own jobs, money, and freedom. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5n2IzVL_ac TRANSCRIPT: For a full transcript visit: http://www.learnliberty.org/videos/us-economic-history-5-economic-growth-in-the-gilded-age LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
Views: 13317 Learn Liberty
US Economic History 2 — Interstate Commerce & the Constitution
 
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The Constitution’s Interstate Commerce clause was supposed to liberate American markets. Video created with the Bill of Rights Institute to help students ace their exams. This is the second video in a series of nine with Professor Brian Domitrovic, which aim to be a resource for students studying for US History exams, and to provide a survey of different (and sometimes opposing) viewpoints on key episodes in U.S. economic history. How do you think we did? SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: Know Your (Bill of) Rights (blog post): This blog post explains what rights each amendment of the Bill of Rights protects, as well as common threats to those rights today. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/know-your-bill-of-rights/ The Original Purpose of the US Constitution - Learn Liberty (video): Professor Randy Barnett explains that the constitution was written to protect the rights of the people. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiMOtS_lzZc Constitutional crisis or the Constitution at work? (blog post): Professor Lauren Hall explains how the constitution is being used to constrain President Trump’s powers today. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/constitutional-crisis-or-the-constitution-at-work/ TRANSCRIPT: Brian Domitrovich: When the United States separated from Britain during the Revolutionary War, the first national government was established under the Articles of Confederation. The Articles created a minimal national government that had little ability to bend the will of the states towards the national interest. This limitation of federal authority became apparent when several states in the new nation became involved in trade disputes. In the years prior to the passage of the Constitution, in 1789, states routinely passed tariffs on each other. If a merchant in one state brought a good across a state border, the merchandise was subject to attacks, collectible by a customs agent. Tariffs caused ill will among the states as trade wars developed. Meanwhile, the national Congress was unable to get all the states to agree to a standard tariff on imported goods to raise tax revenue, and government was deeply in debt from the Revolutionary War and needed the revenue. The national government, under the Articles, could not do anything about these problems. Leaders became concerned that the tension could undo the union. Just before the Constitutional convention met in 1787, James Madison wrote a pamphlet called the Vices of the Political System. In that essay, he wrote that, "The practices of many states in restricting commercial intercourse with other states, and putting their productions and manufacturers on the same footing as with foreign nations. They're not contrary to the federal Articles. It's certainly a verse to the spirit of the union, and tends to beget retaliating regulations.… They are destructive of the general harmony.” This was one of the reasons some founders supported a new federal government that would replace the Articles of Confederation. And so it came to pass that the Constitution was ratified in 1789. Now one of the most significant new powers of the federal government under the Constitution was the power of Congress to regulate trade as outlined in Article I section 8 of the Constitution. The document specified that Congress had the power to "regulate commerce with foreign nations and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes." Furthermore, Congress, but not the states was also authorized to levy "taxes, duties, imposts, and excises." Upon ratification of the Constitution, states could no longer regulate trades among themselves, only Congress now had that authority, but even here the power was limited in that federal taxes had to be uniformed across all the states. Congress retained sole authority to regulate trade with other nations. Nonetheless, in future eras, including today, the commerce clause is used to justify almost any Congressional regulation of the economy, and many Congressional laws. This appears to be at variance with the narrow and define purpose of the commerce clause. Article I Section 8 at the time it was written. Its purpose was to end state tariffs and duties, to prevent in concert with other articles in the Constitution, Congress from discriminating against trade from any particular state, and to give Congress the sole power of imposing taxes on foreign goods. The development of a vast administrative and regulatory state in the 20th and now the 21st Century, came because Congress and the courts felt that the commerce clause of Article I Section 8 of the Constitution, could be interpreted much more broadly, than it initially was in the 1780s and 1790s. LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
Views: 14049 Learn Liberty
Economic Schools of Thought: Crash Course Economics #14
 
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We talk a lot about Keynesian economics on this show, pretty much because the real world currently runs on Keynesian principles. That said, there are some other economic ideas out there, and today we're going to talk about a few of them. So, if you've been aching to hear about socialism, communism, the Chicago School, or the Austrian School, this episode is for you. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 816887 CrashCourse
The Industrial Economy: Crash Course US History #23
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the Industrial Economy that arose in the United States after the Civil War. You know how when you're studying history, and you're reading along and everything seems safely in the past, and then BOOM you think, "Man, this suddenly seems very modern." For me, that moment in US History is the post-Reconstruction expansion of industrialism in America. After the Civil War, many of the changes in technology and ideas gave rise to this new industrialism. You'll learn about the rise of Captains of Industry (or Robber Barons) like Cornelius Vanderbilt, Andrew Carnegie, John D Rockefeller, and JP Morgan. You'll learn about trusts, combinations, and how the government responded to these new business practices. All this, plus John will cover how workers reacted to the changes in society and the early days of the labor movement. You'll learn about the Knights of Labor and Terence Powderly, and Samuel Gompers and the AFL. As a special bonus, someone gets beaten with a cane. AGAIN. What is it with American History and people getting beaten with canes? Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 1942088 CrashCourse
CO2 Regulation = Global Economic Recession
 
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History indicates that the only way to significantly reduce CO2 emission is to orchestrate a contraction of the economy.
Views: 366 co2science
Economic History Latest News: ECB's Noyer Says Financial Market Regulation Needed
 
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ECB's Noyer says financial market regulation needed Strengthening regulation of financial markets is necessary to reduce risks, ECB policymaker Christian Noyer said on Saturday, in a speech entitled "The end of the dictatorship of finance". Noyer, who has in the past turned up the heat on London's role as Europe's finance hub, criticized accounting rules which he said fuelled "short-termism" and said the opaque nature of some parts of the markets had fuelled the financial crisis. http://us.rd.yahoo.com/finance/news/rss/story/SIG=14kf3tqn2/*http%3A//us.rd.yahoo.com/finance/news/topfinstories/SIG=12hvsgo2m/*http%3A//finance.yahoo.com/news/ecbs-noyer-says-financial-market-093840352.html?l=1 Brightening jobs picture may draw Fed closer to tapering Job growth was stronger than expected in June and the employment count for the prior two months was revised higher, showing the economy on solid ground and likely keeping the Federal Reserve on track to scale back its massive monetary stimulus later this year. http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/reuters/businessNews/~3/dwnEOE78ZHU/story01.htm US economy adds 195K jobs; unemployment 7.6 pct. U.S. employers added a robust 195,000 jobs in June and many more in April and May than previously thought. The job growth suggests a stronger economy and makes it more likely the Federal Reserve will slow its bond purchases before year's end. http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/3d281c11a96b4ad082fe88aa0db04305/Article_2013-07-05-Economy/id-bdb82d05c3a343f2bfec02ad9b035726 http://www.wochit.com
Views: 42 Wochit Business
US Economic History 1 — How Mercantilism Started the American Revolution
 
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The British Empire’s mercantilist plan backfired — and led to the American Revolution. Video created with the Bill of Rights Institute to help students ace their exams. This is the first video in a series of nine with Professor Brian Domitrovic, which aim to be a resource for students studying for US History exams, and to provide a survey of different (and sometimes opposing) viewpoints on key episodes in U.S. economic history. How do you think we did? SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: Why the American Revolution Was Really an Economic Revolution (blog article): Dr. Robert Wright argues that the American Revolution was just as much caused by economic concerns as it was by political concerns. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/why-the-american-revolution-was-really-an-economic-revolution/ What Motivated Adam Smith? (video): Why did Adam Smith attack mercantilism? Professor Jim Otteson explains what motivated Smith to write The Wealth of Nations. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqMK3LmHPZs America’s Founding (video series): Looking to learn more about Colonial America? In this series, Professor Sarah Burns explains the philosophical ideas behind the American Revolution. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wphUAtDGko&list=PL-erRSWG3IoBoVW9dHNg_rcZn-Dj_CQ7o TRANSCRIPT: For a full transcript please visit: http://www.learnliberty.org/videos/how-mercantilism…rican-revolution/ ‎ LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
Views: 37194 Learn Liberty
How Reinventing Regulation Can Boost Economic Growth
 
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A conversation with Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper and New Belgium co-founder Kim Jordan Improving regulatory processes can be a powerful and cost-effective economic development strategy for states. According to research by The Pew Charitable Trusts, two reforms have the strongest potential to boost state economies: First, states can make it less costly and time-consuming for businesses to comply with regulations. And second, they can partner with businesses to increase compliance and create economic opportunities. In Colorado, Governor John Hickenlooper has demonstrated the value of these strategies. He has implemented a statewide effort to set and achieve annual goals for reducing compliance costs for businesses while protecting public health and the environment. In 2017, Colorado agencies reported saving businesses 2.3 million hours, largely by eliminating unnecessary administrative tasks and making the experience more user-friendly. The businesses can now put those hours to better use. Pew will host a conversation with Hickenlooper and Kim Jordan, founder of New Belgium Brewing Co., about how states can work collaboratively with businesses to help them navigate and comply with regulatory requirements and support economic growth. The event will take place at History Colorado Center.
Views: 313 Pew
Behavioral Economics - Conversations with History
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv) Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Professor Richard H. Thaler for a discussion of behavioral economics. Professor Thaler discusses theory in economics, how observed human behavior points to anomalies that contradict what theory predicts will happen, and the implications of behavioral economics for public policy including its contribution to understanding the 2008 economic collapse and to shaping future regulation. Series: "Conversations with History" [1/2011] [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 20513]
A Provocative Look at Business, Economics, and Regulation: An Economic Romance (2001)
 
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Russell David "Russ" Roberts (born September 19, 1954) is a research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution well known for communicating economics to non-economists as host of the EconTalk podcast. Roberts was awarded a B.A. in economics in 1975 from the University of North Carolina and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago in 1981 for thesis on the design of government transfer programs under the supervision of Gary Becker. Roberts has taught at George Mason University, Washington University in St. Louis (where he was the founding director of what is now the Center for Experiential Learning), the University of Rochester, Stanford University, and the University of California, Los Angeles. He is a regular commentator on business and economics for National Public Radio's Morning Edition, and has written for the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. Roberts also blogs at Cafe Hayek[11] with Donald J. Boudreaux at George Mason University in Fairfax County, Virginia.[12] He published the novel The Invisible Heart which conveys economic ideas in the context of a narrative. In 2008, Roberts released another novel, The Price of Everything, which addresses concepts such as spontaneous order, price gouging, and market economics in crisis situations. Books The Choice: A Fable of Free Trade and Protectionism (1st ed.). Prentice Hall. 1994. ISBN 0-13-083008-9. OCLC 29357777. The Choice: A Fable of Free Trade and Protectionism (3rd ed.). Prentice Hall. 2006. ISBN 0-13-143354-7. OCLC 70839758. The Choice: A Fable of Free Trade and Protectionism (CD AUDIO). Princeton, NJ: Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic. 2002. OCLC 51110966. The Invisible Heart: An Economic Romance (1st ed.). MIT Press. 2002. ISBN 0-26-268135-8. OCLC 44413917. The Price of Everything: A Parable of Possibility and Prosperity (1st ed.). Princeton University Press. 2008. ISBN 0-691-14335-8. OCLC 231587398. Gambling with other people's money: how perverted incentives caused the financial crisis. Legatum Institute. 2010. ISBN 1-90-740906-8. OCLC 751698980. How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life: An Unexpected Guide to Human Nature and Happiness. Portfolio Hardcover. 2014. ISBN 978-1591846840. OCLC 881681030. Articles and papers "Working Papers in Economics": Domestic Studies Program (Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace): Financing Public Goods. no. E-86-9. 1986. OCLC 39865959. Also published as: "Financing Public Goods". The Journal of Political Economy 95 (2): 420–437. April 1987. doi:10.1086/261463. ISSN 0022-3808. OCLC 4909126868 and 4642352849 Subsidies to Private Spending on Public Goods. no. E-88-22. 1988. OCLC 22871627. Also published as: "Government Subsidies to Private Spending on Public Goods". Public Choice 74 (2): 133–152. September 1985. doi:10.1007/bf00140763. ISSN 0048-5829. OCLC 4896270623 and 820433559 "A Positive Model of Private Charity and Public Transfers". Journal of Political Economy 92 (1): 136–148. February 1984. doi:10.1086/261212. ISSN 0022-3808. OCLC 4642344583 and 4909122660 "A Taxonomy of Public Provision". Public Choice 47 (1): 267–303. 1985. doi:10.1007/BF00119360. ISSN 0048-5829. OCLC 4896262400, 12661266 and 4670565023 "Recipient Preferences and the Design of Government Transfer Programs". Journal of Law and Economics 28 (1): 27–54. April 1985. doi:10.1086/467074. ISSN 0022-2186. OCLC 4645633697 and 4894164421 "Why Comply: One-Sided Enforcement of Price Controls and Victimless Crime Laws". Journal of Legal Studies 18 (2). 1989. ISSN 0047-2530. OCLC 4644767691. With John R. Lott. "A Guide to the Pitfalls of Identifying Price Discrimination". Economic Inquiry 29 (1): 14–23. 1991. doi:10.1111/j.1465-7295.1991.tb01249.x. ISSN 0095-2583. OCLC 4636562702. "When Does a Decrease in a Distortion Increase Welfare?". Economic Letters 39 (1): 37–42. 1992. doi:10.1016/0165-1765(92)90098-J. ISSN 0165-1765. OCLC 4929946941. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russ_Roberts
Views: 727 The Film Archives
Monopolies and Anti-Competitive Markets: Crash Course Economics #25
 
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What is a monopoly? It turns out, it's more than just a board game. It's a terrible, terrible economic practice in which giant corporations dominate markets and hurt consumers. Except when it isn't. In some industries, monopolies are the most efficient way to do business. Utilities like electricity, water, and broadband internet access are probably less efficiently delivered in competitive markets. Come along, and let us monopolize your attention for a few minutes. You might learn something. And you might land on Free Parking. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 475913 CrashCourse
The Economic History of European Jews: Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages by Prof. Michael Toch
 
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An expert panel held on the Occasion of the Publication of Prof. Michael Toch's book: "The Economic History of European Jews: Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages". Panel Chairman: Dr. Yigal Levin of Bar-Ilan University. Panel Members: Prof. Phillip I. Ackerman-Lieberman (E) of Vanderbilt University and Prof. Michael Toch of the Hebrew University (H). The panel took place during the conference "Economic History of the Jews throughout the Ages: Sources, Methodologies, Narratives", jointly organized by the Department of Economics and the Israel and Golda Koschitzky Department of Jewish History at Bar-Ilan University, in June 2013. For All Videos: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXF_IJaFk-9Ci9HGPk__korNRKfson0Yt&feature=mh_lolz Department of Economics: http://econ.biu.ac.il/en The Israel and Golda Koschitzky Department of Jewish History: http://jewish-history.biu.ac.il/en Bar-Ilan University: http://www1.biu.ac.il/en
Views: 2701 barilanuniversity
Economic Regulation - www.HelpWithAssignment.com
 
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The video is about Economic Regulation. Economic Regulation is the process of regulating the economy by the Govt, in order to make way for the economy to run smoothly without any disturbances. It is a process by which a Govt can avoid or atleast minimize the threatning situations like recession and depression caused in business cycles.
POLITICAL THEORY - Adam Smith
 
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Adam Smith was no uncritical apologist for capitalism: he wanted to understand how capitalism could be both fruitful and good. If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ SUBSCRIBE to our channel for new films every week: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7 Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Mike Booth http://www.YouTube.com/SomeGreyBloke #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 966426 The School of Life
Singapore's Economic Success | The Economist
 
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When it started life as an independent, separate country in 1965, Singapore’s prospects did not look good. Tiny and underdeveloped, it had no natural resources and a population of relatively recent immigrants with little shared history. The country’s first prime minister, the late Lee Kuan Yew is credited with transforming it. He called one volume of his memoirs, “From Third World to First”. Why did Singapore become an economic success? First, its strategic location and natural harbour helped. It is at the mouth of the Malacca Strait, through which perhaps 40% of world maritime trade passes. It was an important trading post in the 14th century, and again from the 19th, when British diplomat Sir Stamford Raffles founded the modern city. Now it is at the heart of one of the world’s most dynamic regions. Under Mr Lee, Singapore made the most of these advantages. Second, under Mr Lee, Singapore welcomed foreign trade and investment. Multinationals found Singapore a natural hub and were encouraged to expand and prosper. Third, the government was kept small, efficient and honest—qualities absent in most of Singapore’s neighbours. It regularly tops surveys for the ease of doing business. But the island city is not ideal. Although clean and orderly, it has harsh judicial punishments, a tame press and illiberal social policies. Homosexual acts, for example, remain illegal. Protest demonstrations are rarely permitted. Mr Lee saw his authoritarian style of government as an essential ingredient in Singapore’s success, emphasizing the island’s vulnerability in a potentially hostile neighbourhood. But younger people now question whether Singapore really is that fragile, and resent the restrictions on their freedom.
Views: 217175 The Economist
Economic Effects of Regulation in the U.S.
 
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"Economic Effects of Regulation in the U.S." Chair: Gary Wolfram Hillsdale College "Effects of Financial Regulation" Peter Wallison AEI "Effects of Environmental Regulation" Randal O'Toole Cato Institute "Effects of Regulatory Uncertainty" Steven J. Davis University of Chicago See more from the Free Market Forum at https://www.hillsdale.edu/outreach/free-market-forum
Views: 585 Hillsdale College
EU Trade Policy explained
 
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http://ec.europa.eu/trade/policy/ EU trade policy sets the direction for trade and investment in and out of the EU. The EU aims to play a key role in keeping markets open worldwide and helping Europe to exit from the economic crisis. EU trade policy is working to: create a global system for fair and open trade, open up markets with key partner countries, make sure others play by the rules and ensure trade is a force for sustainable development
Views: 66003 European Commission
Environmental Econ: Crash Course Economics #22
 
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So, if economics is about choices and how we use our resources, econ probably has a lot to say about the environment, right? Right! In simple terms, pollution is just a market failure. The market is producing more pollution than society wants. This week, Adriene and Jacob focus on the environment, and how economics can be used to control and reduce pollution and emissions. You'll learn about supply and demand, incentives, and how government intervention influences the environment. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 298976 CrashCourse
Ceres' Mindy Lubber on Environmental Regulation and Economic Growth
 
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Mindy Lubber, the president of Ceres, explains why economic prosperity and smart environmental regulation go hand in hand.
Views: 513 ClimateProgress
US Economic History 4 — Economic Causes of the Civil War
 
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Federal tariffs and slavery caused tensions that led to the Civil War. Video created with the Bill of Rights Institute to help students ace their exams. This is the fourth video in a series of nine with Professor Brian Domitrovic, which aim to be a resource for students studying for US History exams and to provide a survey of different (and sometimes opposing) viewpoints on key episodes in U.S. economic history. How do you think we did? SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: The Economic Costs of the Civil War (article): You’ve learned about the economic causes of the Civil War, but what were the economic consequences? Burton Fulsom explains the impact of the war on the economy. https://fee.org/articles/the-economic-costs-of-the-civil-war/ The bell curve of anti-slavery (blog post): Professor Michael Douma explains that there was a lot of diversity of ideas in the abolitionist movement. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/the-bell-curve-of-anti-slavery/ What should libertarians think about the Civil War? (blog post): There is a lot of debate over whether libertarians should see themselves as pro-Union or pro-Confederacy in discussions about the Civil War. Dr. Phil Magness explains why both positions are flawed and advocates for a middle ground. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/what-should-libertarians-think-about-the-civil-war/ TRANSCRIPT: For a full transcript please visit: http://www.learnliberty.org/videos/us-economic-history-4-economic-causes-of-the-civil-war LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
Views: 18768 Learn Liberty
Sources for the Study of Economic History of Medieval Period
 
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Subject:Indian Culture Paper: Economic History of India
Views: 417 Vidya-mitra
Lee Smolin: Physics Envy and Economic Theory
 
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Economists were seduced by physics because it made their claims seem more scientific. Their belief was in the concept of equilibrium, in which it would be impossible to profit from trading around a circle of goods or a circle of currencies without actually producing anything. Of course, that is possible, and that did happen, and that's because you're never really at equilibrium. Transcript -- So I got pulled into economics in 2007 because of the 2008 economic crisis. Mike Brown who had been the first CFO of Microsoft, Chief Financial Officer of Microsoft and treasurer of Microsoft, he came to Toronto in 2007 and took my wife and I out to dinner and said he was trying to put together a research group to work on economics and he would like me to be involved. And I said, "I don't know anything about economics." And he said, "That's okay because nobody does and the whole system is about to collapse." He said, "The balance sheets of all the big investment banks -- it's like they have cancer. They're full of holes." And I remember being very struck by this because this was before anybody was talking about this. And so I started to meet with a group of people that he was pulling together to understand what was gonna happen and to understand if there was any way to save the situation. It was a very ambitious thing and, of course, we failed. But along the way I was motivated as a kind of public service to get interested in economics. And what I found . . . economics, in a way, is very easy for a physicist to understand because it's very mathematical. And the mathematical models that they use are very clean. They're based on assumptions and hypotheses, and you can study them. And as I studied it I began to understand, some for myself and more from just reading around because the faults with the standard economic models, with the standard models of finance, are well known. They have been in the literature for decades and decades. So let me give some examples. The standard model of economics is called the neoclassical model and it assumes that markets or systems where trading happens between consumers and firms and there's certain simple models of how that goes on. And the ideas that these come to equilibrium. Equilibrium not in the physical sense but in special economic sense in which you reach a point at which the prices are fixed such that market forces fix the prices such that you maximize the happiness of the consumers and maximize the profits of the firms. And in so called equilibrium nobody can become happier or more profitable without somebody else becoming less happy or less profitable. And the ideology behind this -- not behind the mathematics because mathematics doesn't have an ideology -- but behind the arguments that were made and still are made from this model is that markets don't need regulation because they have these natural equilibria where everybody benefits to the maximum possible. And if you're in equilibrium you can't do better. Now there's a fault with this and it's an obvious fault and it's been known since the 1970s from some theorems proved by some economists including some of the founders of this field of mathematical economics, which is that there's not one equilibrium, there are many equilibria. In fact, there's a vast number of equilibria. And so which equilibria, even assuming that this is a decent model of the economy which is not clear, but even assuming it's a good model, which equilibria you're in depends on the past history, it depends on regulation, it depends on politics, it depends on taste, it depends on changing taste, changing preferences. And so history matters and what's called path dependence matters. This takes us outside the neoclassical model of economics but it doesn't take us outside of economics because some wiser economist, for example, Brian Arthur had for years been developing models and theories of path dependent economy where the history does matter. People from the area of complex systems like Stu Kauffman, Prubac in developing models of markets where the history matters, where there's not a single equilibrium, where there are many equilibria. And where change is paramount. Another symptom of this is the idea that arbitrage isn't, I mean, in these neoclassical models when you go to equilibrium, arbitrage is impossible. Arbitrage is making a profit from trading around a circle of goods or a circle of currencies without actually producing anything. And in equilibrium that's supposed to be impossible but lots of firms and investment banks made fortunes off of currency trading, so why is that? It turns out because you're never really at equilibrium... Remainder of transcript: http://bigthink.com/videos/how-bad-science-led-to-the-economic-crisis Directed / Produced by Jonathan Fowler & Elizabeth Rodd
Views: 58306 Big Think
Price Controls, Subsidies, and the Risks of Good Intentions: Crash Course Economics #20
 
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So, during times of inflation or deflation, why doesn't the government just set prices? It sounds reasonable, but price ceilings or floors just don't work. Adriene and Jacob explain why. Subsidies, however, are a little different, and sometimes they even work. We'll also explain that. Today you'll learn about stuff like price controls, deadweight loss, subsidies, and efficiency. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 382550 CrashCourse
The History of Economic Booms and Busts - Learn Liberty
 
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Stephen Davies talks about the monetary system in all of the past booms and busts in our government and central banks. Learn Liberty's Economic Classes offer a better understanding to economics and how we learn from the past collapses. Register today at: http://www.learnliberty.org/course_de... ► Like us on Facebook! http://facebook.com/LearnLiberty ► Follow us on Twitter! http://twitter.com/LearnLiberty ► Follow us again on Google+! http://bit.ly/1idcoW0 ► Watch more videos: http://LearnLiberty.org
Views: 37060 Learn Liberty
Labor Markets and Minimum Wage: Crash Course Economics #28
 
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How much should you get paid for your job? Well, that depends on a lot of factors. Your skill set, the demand for the skills you have, and what other people are getting paid around you all factor in. In a lot of ways, labor markets work on supply and demand, just like many of the markets we talk about in Crash Course Econ. But, again, there aren't a lot of pure, true markets in the world. There are all kinds of oddities and regulations that change the way labor markets work. One common (and kind of controversial one) is the minimum wage. The minimum wage has potential upsides and downsides, and we'll take a look at the various arguments for an against it. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 500477 CrashCourse
How The Economic Machine Works by Ray Dalio
 
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Economics 101 -- "How the Economic Machine Works." Created by Ray Dalio this simple but not simplistic and easy to follow 30 minute, animated video answers the question, "How does the economy really work?" Based on Dalio's practical template for understanding the economy, which he developed over the course of his career, the video breaks down economic concepts like credit, deficits and interest rates, allowing viewers to learn the basic driving forces behind the economy, how economic policies work and why economic cycles occur. To learn more about Economic Principles visit: http://www.economicprinciples.org. [Also Available In Chinese] 经济这台机器是怎样运行的: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZbeYejg9Pk [Also Available In Russian] Как действует экономическая машина. Автор: Рэй Далио (на русском языке): http://youtu.be/8BaNOlIfMLE
Views: 7051445 Principles by Ray Dalio
Fintech Podcast - Episode 151 - Crypto-Economics as explained by Dr Chris Berg
 
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Our guest today holds a Ph.D. in economics from Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, better know as RMIT University (Australia) His thesis was titled "Safety and Soundness: An Economic History of Prudential Bank Regulation in Australia, 1893-2008", and offered the first comprehensive history of the politics and economics of prudential bank regulation in Australia. Fair to say, my guest knows his financial regulations. Dr. Berg is one of Australia’s most prominent voices for free markets and individual liberty, and a leading authority on over-regulation, economic freedom, and civil liberties. Our talk with him today will be around "Crypto-Economics". About Dr. Chris Berg: Chris Berg is a Postdoctoral Fellow at RMIT University, a Senior Fellow with the Institute of Public Affairs, and an Academic Fellow with the Australian Taxpayers’ Alliance. Dr. Berg is the author of five books including The Libertarian Alternative. Dr. Berg is one of Australia’s most prominent voices for free markets and individual liberty, and a leading authority on over-regulation, economic freedom, and civil liberties. The Cato Institute praised the “wit and grace” of his book Liberty, Equality & Democracy, and the Sydney Morning Herald described him The Libertarian Alternative as “spirited and sometimes wry”. His other books include In Defence of Freedom of Speech: from Ancient Greece to Andrew Bolt, Magna Carta: the tax revolt that gave us liberty and The Growth of Australia’s Regulatory State. He is also the editor of 100 Great Books of Liberty and The National Curriculum: A Critique. Dr Berg has been a regular columnist with the Sunday Age and ABC’s The Drum. In addition, his articles have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, The Australian, the Australian Financial Review, and the Sydney Morning Herald, as well as magazines such as Quadrant, Spectator Australia, and Overland. He is a frequent media commentator on television and radio and appears regularly throughout the electronic press. His scholarly contributions have appeared in the Australian Journal of Political Science, Econ Journal Watch, Agenda, and Trends in Anaesthesia and Critical Care.He holds a He holds a PhD in economics from RMIT University, which was awarded in 2016. His thesis was titled Safety and Soundness: An Economic History of Prudential Bank Regulation in Australia, 1893-2008, and offered the first comprehensive history of the politics and economics of prudential bank regulation in Australia. A few websites should help – http://chrisberg.org/ http://www.cryptoeconomics.com.au/ and http://sites.rmit.edu.au/blockchain-innovation-hub/ Our basic intro to institutional cryptoeconomics is https://www.coindesk.com/institutional-cryptoeconomics/ and we talk about the tax and regulatory treatment of crypto here https://theconversation.com/bitcoin-investors-should-be-taxed-like-any-other-investor-84291 Co-Hosts: Brian Roemmele: http://www.quora.com/Brian-Roemmele Faisal Khan: https://faisalkhan.com Nako Mbelle: http://fintechrecruiters.com/ Official Website: http://aroundthecoin.com We are available on… iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/around-the-coin/id805021615 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/around-the-coin YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/aroundthecoin Quora: https://aroundthecoin.quora.com/ Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/aroundthecoin Medium: https://medium.com/around-the-coin Twitter: https://twitter.com/aroundthecoin Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aroundthecoin/
Views: 415 Around The Coin
The 2008 Financial Crisis: Crash Course Economics #12
 
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Today on Crash Course Economics, Adriene and Jacob talk about the 2008 financial crisis and the US Goverment's response to the troubles. So, all this starts with home mortgages, and the use of mortgages as an investment instrument. For years, it seemed like the US housing market would go up and up. Like a bubble or something. It turns out it was a bubble. But not the good kind. And the government response was...interesting. Anyway, why are you reading this? Watch the video! More Financial Crisis Resources: Financial Crisis Inquiry Report: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/GPO-FCIC/pdf/GPO-FCIC.pdf TAL: Giant Pool of Money: http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/355/the-giant-pool-of-money Timeline of the crisis: https://www.stlouisfed.org/financial-crisis/full-timeline http://www.economist.com/news/schoolsbrief/21584534-effects-financial-crisis-are-still-being-felt-five-years-article Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1543940 CrashCourse
Market Failures, Taxes, and Subsidies: Crash Course Economics #21
 
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This week on Crash Course Econ, Jacob and Adriene are talking about failure. Specifically, we're talking about market failures. When markets don't provide a good or service efficiently, that's a market failure. When markets fail, often governments step in to provide those services. Stuff like public education or military protection are good examples of market failures. So, what are some of the ways governments address, market failures? Well, it's funny you should ask, as we also talk about that in this episode. We'll get into taxes and subsidies and externalities and a bunch of other important stuff this week on Crash Course Econ. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 619483 CrashCourse
Price Fishback - Economic History
 
01:29:37
Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Department of Economics at UBC. Price Fishback is a Professor of Economics at the University of Arizona. Fishback is involved in a long-term study of the political economy of Roosevelt's New Deal during the 1930s that examines both the determinants of New Deal spending and loans and their impact on local economies throughout the U.S. He is continuing his work on state labour legislation during the Progressive Era, and is editing and contributing to a book on the government's role in the economy from colonial times to the present designed for readers who are not specialists in economics. Fishback has written two books: Prelude to the Welfare State: The Origins of Workers' Compensation, and Soft Coal, Hard Choices: The Economic Welfare of Bituminous Coal Miners, 1890 to 1930. His past work includes studies of the origins of workers' compensation, company towns, coal miners, compensating differentials for workplace risks, workplace safety regulation, corruption, labour markets in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and discrimination in labour markets and by governments.
Jeff Madrick - economic history; from1970 to the economic crisis today
 
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this is a reshare from my friend Joe Friendly´s channel. i encourage you to visit and subscribe this channel http://www.youtube.com/user/joefriendly About the lecture : A lecture and book signing by noted economist Jeff Madrick "Greed will always be with us," he writes, "but it rises and falls with the times." In Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, Madrick brings a narrative history of how greed bred America's economic ills over the past forty years—and in so doing tells us how we got to the crisis of 2008 and to the perilous situation we now face. He talks about the impact of the 1970s—a decade of punishingly high inflation and unemployment.. . . . Madrick addresses how tax and economic policies contributed to the nation's ills. A 50-year-old, free-market economic theory was resurrected to justify weakening or eliminating government regulation and social programs. Businesses organized aggressive, well-financed lobbying efforts to support such views. The single-minded pursuit and justification of self-interest has risen to levels of increasing destructiveness. Age of Greed is a history of this era, told through the lives of the individuals most responsible for it. . . . .Jeff Madrick is a professor of economics at Cooper Union, contributor to The New York Review of Books and former economics columnist at the New York Times. Event at Cooper Union Rose Auditorium June 2, 2011. Camera Joe Friendly NEW our community pages on facebook and google+ join and share cutting edge lectures and debates http://www.facebook.com/pages/DebatesAndLectures/116019611819249 or https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/117772575137150380936/
Views: 2709 DebatesAndLectures
The Economic Systems Song (Confident by Demi Lovato Parody)
 
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Mr. M and the History Club explains the different types of Economies ( Market, Command, Traditional, and Mixed Economy) To the tune of Confident by Demi Lovato. Check us out on FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/SingingHistoryTeachers Twitter: https://twitter.com/SinginHistTeach Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/The_Singing_History_Teacher
Judge Garrison on Economic History of E. Kentucky
 
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James Garrison, 69, has lived in Clay County, Ky., since 1945. He and his brothers once ran a coal company. He was judge/exercutive of the county 1994-2006. He discusses how government regulation has successively impaired coal mining and tobacco farming in the region.
Views: 1492 Robert McCain
Imports, Exports, and Exchange Rates: Crash Course Economics #15
 
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What is a trade deficit? Well, it all has to do with imports and exports and, well, trade. This week Jacob and Adriene walk you through the basics of imports, exports, and exchange. So, you remember the specialization and trade thing, right? So, that leads to imports and exports. Economically, in the aggregate, this is usually a good thing. Globalization and free trade do tend to increase overall wealth. But not everybody wins. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 956855 CrashCourse
Environmental Economics
 
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021 - Environmental Economics In this video Paul Andersen explains how economic models, like supply and demand, can be applied to environmental systems. The market forces will not protect environmental services until proper valuation and externalities are established. The wealth of a nation can be more accurately measured through the sustainability of the economic model. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: balin, jean victor. (2009). Cartoon cloud. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cartoon_cloud.svg Contrast, H. (2008). Deutsch: Eine Fabrik in China am Ufer des Jangtse.English: A Factory in China at Yangtze River.Euskara: Landare industrialen ondoriz, aire kutsakorra.Nederlands: Industrie langs de Yangtse rivier in China. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Factory_in_China.jpg EPA. (2008). English: Diesel smoke from a big truck. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Diesel-smoke.jpg Evans, N. 17 crew; taken by either H. S. or R. (1972). العربية: صورة الكرة الزرقاء الشهيرة التي تعتبر أول صورة لمنظر الارض الكامل. إلتقطت الصورة في 7 ديسمبر 1972. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Earth_seen_from_Apollo_17.jpg Factory by Anonymous. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://openclipart.org/download/23962/Anonymous-Factory.svg Gizlog. (2011). English: Sigmund Freud Bobble Head/Wackelkopf. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sigmund_Freud_Bobble_Head_Wackelkopf.JPG Zifan, A. (2015). English: Countries by GDP (PPP) per capita in 2014, based on data from the International Monetary Fund. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Countries_by_GDP_(PPP)_Per_Capita_in_2014.svg
Views: 84408 Bozeman Science
The Reagan Revolution: Crash Course US History #43
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! Visit http://dft.ba/-CCWHDVD to buy a set for your home or classroom. In which John Green teaches you about what is often called the Reagan Era. Mainly, it covers the eight years during which a former actor who had also been governor of the state of California was president of the United States. John will teach you about Reagan's election victory over the hapless Jimmy Carter, tax cuts, Reagan's Economic Bill of Rights, union busting, and the Iran-Contra among other things. Learn about Reagan's domestic and foreign policy initiatives, and even a little about Bonzo the Chimp. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. Ronald Reagan signalled a shift to conservative values on the role of government, discussed in his "Time for Choosing" Speech: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/from-a-time-for-choosing-speech America turned to President Reagan for comfort in times of tragedy, including following the Challenger Disaster: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/ronald-reagan-on-the-challenger-disaster Follow us! http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan http://www.twitter.com/raoulmeyer http://www.twitter.com/thoughtbubbler
Views: 1980535 CrashCourse
The New Deal: Crash Course US History #34
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about the New Deal, which was president Franklin D. Roosevelt's plan to pull the united States out of the Great Depression of the 1930's. Did it work? Maybe. John will teach you about some of the most effective and some of the best known programs of the New Deal. They weren't always the same thing. John will tell you who supported the New Deal, and who opposed it. He'll also get into how the New Deal changed the relationship between the government and citizens, and will even reveal just how the Depression ended. (hint: it was war spending) Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. President Roosevelt developed his New Deal policies to ease the economic burdens of the Great Depression, a grim reality he began to tackle with his first fireside chat: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/president-roosevelt-s-first-fireside-chat In his Economic Bill of Rights, FDR tried to get the country to trust its banks again: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-economic-bill-of-rights Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @br8dybrunch
Views: 2495898 CrashCourse
The European Union Explained*
 
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The European Union with a lot of asterisks. Support these videos: https://www.patreon.com/cgpgrey
Views: 7226172 CGP Grey
The real truth about the 2008 financial crisis | Brian S. Wesbury | TEDxCountyLineRoad
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The Great Economic Myth of 2008, challenging the accounting to accounting principal. Brian Wesbury is Chief Economist at First Trust Advisors L.P., a financial services firm based in Wheaton, Illinois. Mr. Wesbury has been a member of the Academic Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago since 1999. In 2012, he was named a Fellow of the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas, TX where he works closely with its 4%-Growth Project. His writing appears in various magazines, newspapers and blogs, and he appears regularly on Fox, Bloomberg, CNBCand BNN Canada TV. In 1995 and 1996, he served as Chief Economist for the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress. The Wall Street Journal ranked Mr. Wesbury the nation’s #1 U.S. economic forecaster in 2001, and USA Today ranked him as one of the nation’s top 10 forecasters in 2004. Mr. Wesbury began his career in 1982 at the Harris Bank in Chicago. Former positions include Vice President and Economist for the Chicago Corporation and Senior Vice President and Chief Economist for Griffin, Kubik, Stephens, & Thompson. Mr. Wesbury received an M.B.A. from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management, and a B.A. in Economics from the University of Montana. McGraw-Hill published his first book, The New Era of Wealth, in October 1999. His most recent book, It’s Not As Bad As You Think, was published in November 2009 by John Wiley & Sons. In 2011, Mr. Wesbury received the University of Montana’s Distinguished Alumni Award. This award honors outstanding alumni who have “brought honor to the University, the state or the nation.” There have been 267 recipients of this award out of a potential pool of 91,000 graduates. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 1953783 TEDx Talks
Jordan: Regulations Should Not Stifle Economic Growth for Small Businesses
 
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Rep. Jim Jordan (OH-04), Chairman of the Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs, discusses the importance of listening to American job creators to see which federal regulations hurt or help their businesses. Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs, Stimulus Oversight, and Government Spending, "Assessing the Impact of Greenhouse Gas Regulations on Small Business." The hearing continued a dialogue with private-sector job creators about the impact that federal actions have on the economy and seeks to engage the executive branch on improvements in the regulatory climate. April 6, 2011.
Regulating Monopolies: A History of Electricity Regulation - Learn Liberty
 
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Prof. Lynne Kiesling discusses the history of regulating electricity monopolies in America. Conventionally, most people view regulation of monopoly, such as the Sherman Antitrust Act, as one of government's core responsibilities. Kiesling challenges this notion, and finds that government regulation of monopoly actually stifles innovation and hurts consumers. The American electricity industry was booming in the 1890s, with several small firms competing against one another. Over time, Kiesling argues that the fixed costs began to escalate, increasing the cost of entry into the industry. Put another way, large competitors gained a significant competitive edge over smaller competitors through economies of scale. Eventually, in places like New York and Chicago, Kiesling claims that the competitive process led to one large firm. These monopolies were feared by the public, and led to demands for government regulation. The electricity industry, knowing that regulation was coming, used these demands for regulation as cover to construct legal barriers to entry. Ultimately, the regulations passed by the government reduced competition by granting legal monopoly privileges to powerful firms within a certain geographical territory. In modern times, we are seeing the real cost of these old one-size-fits-all regulations: 1) People aren't adjusting their energy consumption behaviors. For instance, in peak hours, technological solutions that could smooth electricity consumption are being ignored. 2) The electricity industry doesn't evolve and account for new types of renewable energy. 3) Innovations have been discouraged. If these archaic regulations were removed, innovations and improvements beneficial to consumers would flourish. For more information, check us out here: http://lrnlbty.co/zcPIQr Watch more videos: http://lrnlbty.co/y5tTcY
Views: 49360 Learn Liberty
Best Documentary of the Housing Market Crash (of 2019?) | Inside the Meltdown | Behind the Big Short
 
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MELTDOWN - The Men Who Crashed The World - 2019 The first of a four-part investigation into a world of greed and recklessness that led to financial collapse. In the first episode of Meltdown, we hear about four men who brought down the global economy: a billionaire mortgage-seller who fooled millions; a high-rolling banker with a fatal weakness; a ferocious Wall Street predator; and the power behind the throne. The crash of September 2008 brought the largest bankruptcies in world history, pushing more than 30 million people into unemployment and bringing many countries to the edge of insolvency. Wall Street turned back the clock to 1929. But how did it all go so wrong? Lack of government regulation; easy lending in the US housing market meant anyone could qualify for a home loan with no government regulations in place. Also, London was competing with New York as the banking capital of the world. Gordon Brown, the British finance minister at the time, introduced 'light touch regulation' - giving bankers a free hand in the marketplace. All this, and with key players making the wrong financial decisions, saw the world's biggest financial collapse. Trading Strategies Live Trade Coaching Binary Options CFD's Futures Equities Commodities FX
Views: 959887 TradingCoachUK
Jerry Ellig | Tools for Tracking Economic Regulation | Regulation University
 
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Laws passed by Congress impact the economy, but Congress has no systematic way to comprehensively track and assess the economic impact of legislative actions. This is especially difficult when laws empower federal agencies to regulate. While the current budget process scores and tracks the economic impact of spending and taxes, it does not account for the economic consequences of regulation. http://www.mercatus.org Stay Connected Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/mercatuscenter/ Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/mercatus Email: http://www.mercatus.org/newsletters
Views: 62 Mercatus Center
Intro to Economics: Crash Course Econ #1
 
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In which Jacob Clifford and Adriene Hill launch a brand new Crash Course on Economics! So, what is economics? Good question. It's not necessarily about money, or stock markets, or trade. It's about people and choices. What, you may ask, does that mean. We'll show you. Let's get started! Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Anna-Ester Volozh, Robert Kunz, Jason A Saslow, Christian Ludvigsen, Chris Peters, Brad Wardell, Beatrice Jin, Roger C. Rocha, Eric Knight, Jessica Simmons, Jeffrey Thompson, Elliot Beter, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Ian Dundore, Jessica Wode, SR Foxley, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, Steve Marshall TO: My Students FROM: Mrs. Culp Culpzilla's students are amazing! You guys rock! TO: Everyone FROM: Pankaj DFTBA and keep being the exception like the Mongols. Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Summer Naugle, Minnow, Ilkka Hemmilä, Kaitlyn Celeste, Lee Toran, Sarty, Damian Shaw, Nathaniel "The Skipper" Cruz Chavez, Maura Doyle, Chris, Sander Mutsaers Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 3523284 CrashCourse
Ultimate Alliance: The History of U.S.-Japan Economic Relations since 1945
 
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Ultimate Alliance: The History of U.S.-Japan Economic Relations since 1945 http://www.japansociety.org/event/ultimate-alliance-the-history-of-us-japan-economic-relations-since-1945 This year, in commemoration of the 70 years marking the end of World War II, it has come time to evaluate the history of U.S.-Japan economic ties since 1945. Jointly accounting for over 30% of global domestic product, the countries are major economic powers, to the point where economic conditions within these countries influence market conditions worldwide. The bilateral relationship, while both mutually advantageous and strong, is being affected by current trends such as the rise of China and other emerging economic powers, and Japan’s struggle to achieve sustained economic recovery. Other events have come to pass that have directly affected relations between the countries, such as the signing of the Plaza Accord of 1985 in New York City, the burst of Japan’s “bubble economy,” and the Asian Currency Crisis of 1997, which contributed to the bursting of the U.S. housing bubble, the immediate trigger for the Financial Crisis of 2007-08. But as history suggests, this is one economic relationship that has endured the test of time. In this program, Paul Volcker and Toyoo Gyohten, co-authors of “Changing Fortunes: The World’s Money and the Threat to American Leadership,” discuss the importance of U.S.-Japan relations, encompassing several decades, and share their respective visions for the future of international monetary affairs between the two nations. Speakers: Paul A. Volcker, Chairman, The Volcker Alliance; Former Chairman, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System Toyoo Gyohten, President, The Institute for International Monetary Affairs; former Japanese Vice Minister of Finance for International Affairs Moderator: Jacob Schlesinger, Editor, Financial Regulation, The Wall Street Journal
Views: 602 JapanSocietyNYC
Economic Collapse Confirmed! $22 Trillion Dollar Darkness Of Government Debt 2019 Stock Market CRASH
 
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Shocking video of the imminent economic collapse and the next Great Depression of the United States. The U.S. national debt is wildly out of control, and nobody in Washington seems to care.  According to the U.S. Treasury, the federal government is currently $21,968,903,151,139 in debt.  In just a few days, that figure will cross the 22 trillion dollar mark.  Over the last 10 years, we have added more than 11 trillion dollars to the national debt, and that means that it has been growing at a pace of more than a trillion dollars a year and will cause the biggest economic collapse in history and of course a devastating stock market crash.  To call this a major national crisis would be a massive understatement, and yet there is absolutely no urgency in Washington address this absolutely critical issue.  We are literally destroying the financial future of this nation, but most Americans don’t seem to understand the economic collapse is in our doorstep. If we went back and removed the 11 trillion dollars that the federal government borrowed and spent over the last decade, we would be in the worst economic crisis in American history right now.  But by stealing from the future, the federal government has been able to stabilize things. The global financial elite are really starting to talk up the possibility of a new financial collapse and a major stock market crash. Unfortunately, the future always arrives eventually, and the greatest economic collapse will hit America in the near future. The former fed chair, now a scholar at the Brookings Institution, said there remains an agenda of unfinished regulation. “I’m not sure we’re working on those things in the way we should, and then there remain holes, and then there’s regulatory pushback. So I do worry that we could have another economic collapse.” Our world has never seen anything like the imminent economic collapse that we are facing right now, and most of that debt was accumulated when interest rates were low.  We are heading into a major economic crisis and global depression. the truth is that the government debt is an existential threat to the future of this nation, and we are systematically destroying the very bright future that our children and our grandchildren were supposed to have. The national debt is a problem that should have been handled 20 or 30 years ago. But it wasn’t. This current system is headed for an inevitable economic collapse.  There is no way of getting around it. A horrific stock market crash and economic collapse is coming. It is going to change the world. You better get ready. COURTESY: NO RE-UPLOAD, NO REUSE - FOR LICENSING, PLEASE, CONTACT The Economic Collapse Blog - http://www.theeconomiccollapseblog.com Fair Use Notice: This video contains some copyrighted material whose use has not been authorized by the copyright owners. We believe that this not-for-profit, educational, and/or criticism or commentary use on the Web constitutes a fair use of the copyrighted material (as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. If you wish to use this copyrighted material for purposes that go beyond fair use, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. Fair Use notwithstanding we will immediately comply with any copyright owner who wants their material removed or modified, wants us to link to their web site, or wants us to add their photo. Most of artwork that are included with these videos have been created by Epic Economist and they are used as a representation of the subject matter. The representative artwork included with these videos shall not be construed as the actual events that are taking place. Anything that is said on the video is either opinion, criticism, information or commentary,  If making any type of investment or legal decision it would be wise to contact or consult a professional before making that decision. Use the information found in these videos as a starting point for conducting your own research and conduct your own due diligence before making any significant investing decisions.
Views: 172749 Epic Economist
The Progressive Era: Crash Course US History #27
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps keep the channel producing great content. In which John Green teaches you about the Progressive Era in the United States. In the late 19th and early 20th century in America, there was a sense that things could be improved upon. A sense that reforms should be enacted. A sense that progress should be made. As a result, we got the Progressive Era, which has very little to do with automobile insurance, but a little to do with automobiles. All this overlapped with the Gilded Age, and is a little confusing, but here we have it. Basically, people were trying to solve some of the social problems that came with the benefits of industrial capitalism. To oversimplify, there was a competition between the corporations' desire to keep wages low and workers' desire to have a decent life. Improving food safety, reducing child labor, and unions were all on the agenda in the Progressive Era. While progress was being made, and people were becoming more free, these gains were not equally distributed. Jim Crow laws were put in place in the south, and immigrant rights were restricted as well. So once again on Crash Course, things aren't so simple. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. The Progressive Era was marked by rapid reactions to the Gilded Age: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-progressive-era Literature such as The Jungle revealed the horrifying conditions of factory industries, one of several which were overhauled with new progressive regulations: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/excerpt-from-the-jungle
Views: 2099429 CrashCourse