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Aspects of International Relations: International Political Economy
 
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Featuring academics from the International Relations Department at the LSE, ‘Aspects of IR: International Political Economy’ is a short film about the study of international political economy, particularly at the LSE. The film looks at what we study, and why, and also at the major themes in IPE, such as the financial crisis, climate change and globalisation of markets. It debates how IPE fits into IR, and the rewards and value of studying IPE. Contributors: Dr Julia Gray, Dr James Morrison, Dr Stephen Woolcock For further information please visit: http://www.lse.ac.uk/internationalRelations
Introduction to International Political Economy, Lecture #1
 
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This is a PowerPoint based lecture on fundamental concepts in International Political Economy based on a textbook written by Thomas Oatley.
Views: 50215 Jeffrey Hart
What is HEGEMONIC STABILITY THEORY? What does HEGEMONIC STABILITY THEORY mean?
 
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What is HEGEMONIC STABILITY THEORY? What does HEGEMONIC STABILITY THEORY mean? HEGEMONIC STABILITY THEORY meaning - HEGEMONIC STABILITY THEORY definition - HEGEMONIC STABILITY THEORY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Hegemonic stability theory (HST) is a theory of international relations, rooted in research from the fields of political science, economics, and history. HST indicates that the international system is more likely to remain stable when a single nation-state is the dominant world power, or hegemon. Thus, the fall of an existing hegemon or the state of no hegemon diminishes the stability of the international system. When a hegemon exercises leadership, either through diplomacy, coercion, or persuasion, it is actually deploying its "preponderance of power." This is called hegemony, which refers to a state's ability to "single-handedly dominate the rules and arrangements ... international political and economic relations." HST can help analyze the rise of great powers to the role of world leader or hegemon, which have been ongoing since the 15th century. Also, it can be used to understand and to calculate the future of international politics through the discussion of the symbiotic relation between the declining hegemon and its rising successor. Research on hegemony can be divided into two schools of thought: the realist school and the systemic school. Each school can be further sub-divided. Two dominant theories have emerged from each school. What Robert Keohane first called the "theory of hegemonic stability," joins A. F. K. Organski's Power Transition Theory as the two dominant approaches to the realist school of thought. Long Cycle Theory, espoused by George Modelski, and World Systems Theory, espoused by Immanuel Wallerstein, have emerged as the two dominant approaches to the systemic school of thought. Charles P. Kindleberger is one of the scholars most closely associated with HST, and is regarded by some as the theory's father. In the 1973 book The World in Depression: 1929-1939, he argued that the economic chaos between World War I and World War II that led to the Great Depression was partly attributable to the lack of a world leader with a dominant economy. Kindleberger's reasoning touched upon more than economics, however: the central idea behind HST is that the stability of the global system, in terms of politics, international law, and so on, relies on the hegemon to develop and enforce the rules of the system. In addition to Kindleberger, key figures in the development of hegemonic stability theory include George Modelski, Robert Gilpin, Robert Keohane, Stephen Krasner, and others.
Views: 6719 The Audiopedia
Conversations with History: Robert O. Keohane
 
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UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler welcomes international relations theorist Robert O.Keohane for a discussion of theory, international institutions, and the future of international order. Series: "Conversations with History" [11/2004] [Public Affairs] [Humanities] [Show ID: 8991]
Hegemonic stability theory | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hegemonic_stability_theory 00:03:08 1 Hegemonic rise 00:05:45 2 Competing theories of hegemonic stability 00:06:11 2.1 The systemic school of thought 00:06:55 2.1.1 Long cycle theory 00:11:02 2.2 Other views of hegemonic stability 00:11:13 2.2.1 The neorealist interpretation 00:12:30 2.2.2 The neoliberal interpretation 00:13:36 2.2.3 The classical liberal interpretation 00:14:01 2.2.4 Criticism 00:14:36 3 21st century application 00:14:47 3.1 United States 00:16:36 3.2 China 00:17:43 3.2.1 China's economic growth 00:18:59 3.2.2 China's military expansion 00:21:36 4 Gilpin's argument Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7888573740809499 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Hegemonic stability theory (HST) is a theory of international relations, rooted in research from the fields of political science, economics, and history. HST indicates that the international system is more likely to remain stable when a single nation-state is the dominant world power, or hegemon. Thus, the fall of an existing hegemon or the state of no hegemon diminishes the stability of the international system. When a hegemon exercises leadership, either through diplomacy, coercion, or persuasion, it is actually deploying its "preponderance of power." This is called hegemony, which refers to a state's ability to "single-handedly dominate the rules and arrangements ...[of] international political and economic relations." HST can help analyze the rise of great powers to the role of world leader or hegemon. Also, it can be used to understand and to calculate the future of international politics through the discussion of the symbiotic relation between the declining hegemon and its rising successor.Research on hegemony can be divided into two schools of thought: the realist school and the systemic school. Each school can be further sub-divided. Two dominant theories have emerged from each school. What Robert Keohane first called the "theory of hegemonic stability," joins A. F. K. Organski's Power Transition Theory as the two dominant approaches to the realist school of thought. Long Cycle Theory, espoused by George Modelski, and World Systems Theory, espoused by Immanuel Wallerstein, have emerged as the two dominant approaches to the systemic school of thought.Charles P. Kindleberger is one of the scholars most closely associated with HST, and is regarded by some as the theory's father. In the 1973 book The World in Depression: 1929-1939, he argued that the economic chaos between World War I and World War II that led to the Great Depression was partly attributable to the lack of a world leader with a dominant economy. Kindleberger's reasoning touched upon more than economics, however: the central idea behind HST is that the stability of the global system, in terms of politics, international law, and so on, relies on the hegemon to develop and enforce the rules of the system.In addition to Kindleberger, key figures in the development of hegemonic stability theory include Robert Gilpin, Joanne Gowa, Robert Keohane, Stephen Krasner, George Modelski and others.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
Universities and Slavery | 1 of 5 | Keynote || Radcliffe Institute
 
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WELCOME Lizabeth Cohen, Dean, Radcliffe Institute, and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Harvard University OPENING REMARKS (12:07) Drew Gilpin Faust, President and Lincoln Professor of History, Harvard University KEYNOTE (15:51) Ta-Nehisi Coates, Journalist; National Correspondent, the Atlantic: Author, Between the World and Me (Spiegel & Grau, 2015) and The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood (Spiegel & Grau, 2008) Conversation between Ta-Nehisi Coates and Drew Gilpin Faust (34:37)
Views: 6039 Harvard University
International political economy | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_political_economy 00:01:03 1 Origin 00:01:25 2 Issues in IPE 00:01:34 2.1 International Finance 00:03:11 2.2 Game theory 00:03:20 2.3 International Trade 00:04:33 2.4 Development Studies 00:04:49 2.5 American vs. British IPE 00:05:55 3 Notable IPE scholars 00:06:05 4 Notable programs and studies 00:07:54 5 Professional associations 00:08:20 6 Notes and references 00:08:29 7 Further reading Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= International political economy (IPE), also known as global political economy (GPE), refers to either economics or an interdisciplinary academic discipline that analyzes economics and international relations. When it is used to refer to the latter, it usually focuses on political economy and economics, although it may also draw on a few other distinct academic schools, notably political science, also sociology, history, and cultural studies. IPE is most closely linked to the fields of Macroeconomics, International Business, International Development and Development Economics. IPE scholars are at the center of the debate and research surrounding globalization, international trade, international finance, financial crises, microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, (poverty and the role of institutions in development), global markets, political risk, multi-state cooperation in solving trans-border economic problems, and the structural balance of power between and among states and institutions.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Diana C. Mutz | How Much Is One American Worth? || Radcliffe Institute
 
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Diana C. Mutz delivers the 2015–2016 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture in the Social Sciences at the Radcliffe Institute for the Advanced Study. In her talk, “How Much is One American Worth? Public Opinion toward Globalization,” Mutz examines the psychological, political, economic, and philosophical underpinnings of American attitudes toward policies such as international trade and outsourcing.
Views: 1647 Harvard University
Scales of Environmental Justice: Building a Transformative Politics
 
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The Environment Forum at the Mahindra Center is convened by Robin Kelsey (Dean of Arts and Humanities, Harvard University) and Ian Jared Miller (Professor of History, Harvard University). http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/scales-environmental-justice-building-transformative-politics
Views: 1190 Harvard University
Askwith Forum: Changes in Mind - Five Decades of Insights into Intelligence, Thinking, and Learning
 
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Speakers: Drew Gilpin Faust, president and Lincoln Professor of History, Harvard University James E. Ryan, dean and Charles William Eliot Professor, HGSE Howard Gardner, co-founder and co-director, Project Zero (1972-2000); Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education, HGSE; adjunct professor of Psychology, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences Dave Perkins, Carl H. Pforzheimer, Jr. Professor of Teaching and Learning, Emeritus, HGSE Steven Seidel, Ed.M.’89, Ed.D.’95, director, Project Zero (2000-2007); Bauman and Bryant Senior Lecturer on Arts in Education, HGSE Shari Tishman, Ed.D.’91, director, Project Zero (2007-2014); lecturer on education, HGSE Daniel Wilson, Ed.M.’94, Ed.D.’07, director, Project Zero (2014-present) This Askwith Forum will offer insights gleaned from a half-century of iconoclastic investigations into changing conceptions of the mind and the implications of these changes for today’s teachers, schools, and society. “This is a fantastic opportunity to explore and reflect on how our perceptions of how our minds work have changed over the past fifty years,” said Daniel Wilson, director of Project Zero. "The role of education in today’s complex world requires us to take stock in what we know about the human mind and consider how to best cultivate citizens of tomorrow. We look forward to sharing views on major insights, and discussing implications for educators from current luminary thinkers in our field.” Project Zero (PZ) is a Harvard Graduate School of Education research center that focuses on learning, thinking, and creativity in the arts, as well as humanistic and scientific disciplines, at the individual and institutional levels. Project Zero will launch its year-long 50th anniversary by hosting this special Askwith Forum as part of HUBweek in Boston.
Views: 4942 HarvardEducation
Michael Jakob, “Landscape Architecture and the ‘New Generic'”
 
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Michael Jakob teaches History and Theory of Landscape at hepia, Geneva, and aesthetics of design at HEAD, Geneva. He is a visiting professor at Politecnico di Milano and the Accademia di Architettura in Mendrisio. He is, at the same time, Professor of ComparativeLiterature (Chair) at Grenoble University. Jakob's teaching and research focus on landscape theory, aesthetics, the history of vertigo, contemporary theories of perception and the poetics of architecture. He is the founder and head of COMPAR(A)ISON, an International Journal of Comparative Literature and the chief editor of “di monte in monte”, a series of books on mountain culture (Edizioni Tarara’, Verbania). He produced several documentary films for TV and has a longstanding experience as a radio journalist. Michael Jakob published recently: 100 Paysages, Infolio, Gollion 2011; asp Architecture du paysage, Infolio, Gollion 2012; Mirei Shigemori e il nuovo linguaggio del giardino giapponese, Tarara’, Verbania 2012; the swiss touch in landscape architecture, Tarara’, Verbania 2013/ Ifengspace, Tianjing 2015; La poétique du banc, Macula, Paris 2014/ Sulla Panchina, Einaudi, Turin 2014/ The Bench in the Garden, Oro Editions, Bay Area 2017; Cette ville qui nous regarde, b2 éditions, Paris 2015/ Dall’alto della città, Lettera 22, Siracusa 2017. Jakob is a curator of international exhibitions and the author of documentary films on landscape (Chiappetti o il paradiso perduto, RAI, 2014, and Capri: a lezione di paesaggio, 2016).
Views: 1385 Harvard GSD
International relations | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: International relations Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= International relations (IR) or international affairs (IA) — commonly also referred to as international studies (IS), global studies (GS), or global affairs (GA) — is the study of interconnectedness of politics, economics and law on a global level. Depending on the academic institution, it is either a field of political science, an interdisciplinary academic field similar to global studies, or an entirely independent academic discipline in which students take a variety of internationally focused courses in social science and humanities disciplines. In all cases, the field studies relationships between political entities (polities) such as sovereign states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), international non-governmental organizations (INGOs), other non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs), and the wider world-systems produced by this interaction. International relations is an academic and a public policy field, and so can be positive and normative, because it analyses and formulates the foreign policy of a given state. As political activity, international relations dates from the time of the Greek historian Thucydides (c. 460–395 BC), and, in the early 20th century, became a discrete academic field (no. 5901 in the 4-digit UNESCO Nomenclature) within political science. In practice, international relations and international affairs forms a separate academic program or field from political science, and the courses taught therein are highly interdisciplinary.For example, international relations draws from the fields of politics, economics, international law, communication studies, history, demography, geography, sociology, anthropology, criminology, psychology, and gender studies. The scope of international relations encompasses issues such as globalization, diplomatic relations, state sovereignty, international security, ecological sustainability, nuclear proliferation, nationalism, economic development, global finance, terrorism, and human rights.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
The Next Level of Diplomacy: Youth and Global Engagement
 
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Farah Pandith, Special Representative to Muslim Communities; Zeenat Rahman, Special Adviser for Global Youth Issues; and Kathy Calvin, President and CEO, UN Foundation participated in a panel event to encourage youth involvement in foreign affairs at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, DC on April 18, 2013.
Hillary Rodham Clinton | Radcliffe Day 2018
 
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On Radcliffe Day 2018, Friday, May 25, we awarded the Radcliffe Medal to Hillary Rodham Clinton (1:32:14). As an attorney, a first lady, a senator, a secretary of state, and the first woman nominated by a major party for the US presidency, Secretary Clinton has worked tirelessly over the course of decades in the public eye, often under unprecedented scrutiny, to make meaningful change. Radcliffe Day features a personal tribute to Secretary Clinton delivered by the global affairs trailblazer, former secretary of state, and 2001 Radcliffe Medalist Madeleine Albright (35:09) and a wide-ranging keynote conversation between Secretary Clinton and Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey ’92 (46:45). Introduction by Lizabeth Cohen, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies at Harvard University For information about the Radcliffe Institute and its many public programs, visit https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/RadcliffeInstitute Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/RadInstitute Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/radcliffe.institute
Views: 4651 Harvard University
Adrienne Germain, President Emerita of the International Women's Health Coalition
 
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Adrienne Germain, President Emerita of the International Women's Health Coalition (IWHC) is a widely recognized architect of the international movement for women's health and human rights. She has led IWHC's work on international health and population policy with the UN, governments and NGOs especially in Africa, Asia and Latin America, and has provided sustained support for the building of women's health and rights organizations in several low-income countries. In June, 2012, Ms. Germain received the United Nations Population Award in recognition of her lifetime work. She spoke at HSPH as part of the Decision-making: Voices from the Field series about women's health and human rights on November 5, 2012. Watch the entire series at http://hsph.me/63.
Morning Exercises | Harvard University Commencement 2014
 
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The Morning Exercises at Harvard's 363nd Commencement at Tercentenary Theatre on May 29, 2014. For more information on this year's Commencement, visit http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/. Welcome to the 363rd Harvard Commencement. Although Harvard's first Commencement in 1642 is more than 372 years behind us, Commencement numbering has fallen out of step as exercises were omitted for reasons ranging from war to plague. The cumulative effect is that 2014, for example, marks only the 363rd Harvard Commencement. Commencement at Harvard is comprised of three components: the ceremonial Morning Exercises, during which University degrees are conferred; the mid-day luncheons and diploma-awarding ceremonies at the undergraduate Houses, Graduate and Professional Schools; and the afternoon Annual Meeting of the Harvard Alumni Association, during which Harvard's president and the featured Commencement speaker deliver their addresses. The Morning Exercises, which convene in the outdoor Tercentenary Theatre, are attended by approximately 32,000 degree candidates, family members, faculty, alumni/ae, and guests.
Views: 39290 Harvard University
Mike Bloomberg Delivers Rice University Commencement Address
 
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Mike Bloomberg delivers remarks at the 2018 Rice University Commencement ceremony on May 12, 2018 in Houston, TX. https://mikebloom.bg/2IjgpL6
Views: 2651 mikebloomberg
Harvard University Commencement 2017 Morning Exercises
 
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The Morning Exercises at Harvard's 366th Commencement at Tercentenary Theatre on May 25, 2017. For more information, visit http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/topic/commencement-2017/.
Views: 52507 Harvard University
International politics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_relations 00:02:10 1 History 00:06:34 1.1 Study of international relations 00:08:51 2 Theory 00:09:00 2.1 Normative theory 00:09:34 2.2 Epistemological theory 00:11:20 2.3 Positivist theories 00:11:29 2.3.1 Realism 00:14:26 2.3.2 Liberalism 00:16:28 2.3.3 Neoliberalism 00:17:30 2.3.4 Regime theory 00:18:48 2.4 Post-positivist/reflectivist theories 00:18:58 2.4.1 International society theory (the English school) 00:19:46 2.4.2 Social constructivism 00:21:51 2.4.3 Feminism 00:23:57 2.4.4 Marxism 00:26:08 2.5 Leadership theories 00:26:17 2.5.1 Interest group perspective 00:26:47 2.5.2 Strategic perspective 00:27:09 2.5.3 Inherent bad faith model 00:27:54 2.6 Post-structuralist theories 00:29:09 3 Levels of analysis 00:29:19 3.1 Systemic level concepts 00:29:51 3.1.1 Sovereignty 00:30:51 3.1.2 Power 00:31:26 3.1.3 National interest 00:32:25 3.1.4 Non-state actors 00:33:21 3.1.5 Power blocs 00:34:15 3.1.5.1 Polarity 00:37:24 3.1.6 Interdependence 00:37:59 3.1.7 Dependency 00:38:28 3.1.8 Systemic tools of international relations 00:40:49 3.2 Unit-level concepts in international relations 00:41:10 3.2.1 Regime type 00:41:53 3.2.2 Revisionism/status quo 00:42:35 3.2.3 Religion 00:43:29 3.3 Individual or sub-unit level concepts 00:45:28 4 Institutions in international relations 00:45:56 4.1 Generalist inter-state organizations 00:46:06 4.1.1 United Nations 00:46:39 4.1.2 Organisation of Islamic Cooperation 00:47:07 4.1.3 Other 00:47:18 4.2 Economic institutions 00:47:28 4.3 International legal bodies 00:47:37 4.3.1 Human rights 00:47:45 4.3.2 Legal 00:47:53 4.4 Regional security arrangements 00:48:02 5 See also 00:48:36 6 Notes and references 00:48:46 7 Bibliography 00:49:31 7.1 Theory 00:52:16 7.2 Textbooks 00:52:25 7.3 History of international relations 00:52:35 8 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= International relations (IR) or international affairs (IA) — commonly also referred to as international studies (IS), global studies (GS), or global affairs (GA) — is the study of interconnectedness of politics, economics and law on a global level. Depending on the academic institution, it is either a field of political science, an interdisciplinary academic field similar to global studies, or an entirely independent academic discipline in which students take a variety of internationally focused courses in social science and humanities disciplines. In all cases, the field studies relationships between political entities (polities) such as sovereign states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), international non-governmental organizations (INGOs), other non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs), and the wider world-systems produced by this interaction. International relations is an academic and a public policy field, and so can be positive and normative, because it analyses and formulates the foreign policy of a given state. As political activity, international relations dates from the time of the Greek historian Thucydides (c. 460–395 BC), and, in the early 20th century, became a discrete academic field (no. 5901 in the 4-digit UNESCO Nomenclature) within political science. In practice, international relations and international affairs forms a separate academic program or field from political science, and the courses taught therein are highly interdisciplinary.For example, international relations draws from the fields of politics, economics, international law, communication studies, history, demography, geography, sociology, anthropology, criminology, psychology, and gender studies. The scope of international relations encompasses issues such as globalization, diplomatic relations, state sovereignty, international security, ecological sustainability, nuclear proliferation, nationalism, economic development, global financ ...
Views: 11 wikipedia tts
McDonough School of Business MBA Commencement Ceremony 2016
 
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The events speaker was Gayle Smith who is an Administrator at United States Agency for International Development (USAID). She also received a Honorary Degree for Doctor of Humane Letters.
S-CAR Parents of the Field: J. David Singer
 
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J. David Singer will be remembered as the pioneer of conflict and peace studies who insisted on empirical evidence for theoretical statements as epitomized by his "Correlates of War" project, if not for the charm, wit, and sense of humor with which he led his life. http://scar.gmu.edu/parents
International affairs | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_relations 00:02:10 1 History 00:06:34 1.1 Study of international relations 00:08:51 2 Theory 00:09:00 2.1 Normative theory 00:09:34 2.2 Epistemological theory 00:11:20 2.3 Positivist theories 00:11:29 2.3.1 Realism 00:14:26 2.3.2 Liberalism 00:16:28 2.3.3 Neoliberalism 00:17:30 2.3.4 Regime theory 00:18:48 2.4 Post-positivist/reflectivist theories 00:18:58 2.4.1 International society theory (the English school) 00:19:46 2.4.2 Social constructivism 00:21:51 2.4.3 Feminism 00:23:57 2.4.4 Marxism 00:26:08 2.5 Leadership theories 00:26:17 2.5.1 Interest group perspective 00:26:47 2.5.2 Strategic perspective 00:27:09 2.5.3 Inherent bad faith model 00:27:54 2.6 Post-structuralist theories 00:29:09 3 Levels of analysis 00:29:19 3.1 Systemic level concepts 00:29:51 3.1.1 Sovereignty 00:30:51 3.1.2 Power 00:31:26 3.1.3 National interest 00:32:25 3.1.4 Non-state actors 00:33:21 3.1.5 Power blocs 00:34:15 3.1.5.1 Polarity 00:37:24 3.1.6 Interdependence 00:37:59 3.1.7 Dependency 00:38:28 3.1.8 Systemic tools of international relations 00:40:49 3.2 Unit-level concepts in international relations 00:41:10 3.2.1 Regime type 00:41:53 3.2.2 Revisionism/status quo 00:42:35 3.2.3 Religion 00:43:29 3.3 Individual or sub-unit level concepts 00:45:28 4 Institutions in international relations 00:45:56 4.1 Generalist inter-state organizations 00:46:06 4.1.1 United Nations 00:46:39 4.1.2 Organisation of Islamic Cooperation 00:47:07 4.1.3 Other 00:47:18 4.2 Economic institutions 00:47:28 4.3 International legal bodies 00:47:37 4.3.1 Human rights 00:47:45 4.3.2 Legal 00:47:53 4.4 Regional security arrangements 00:48:02 5 See also 00:48:36 6 Notes and references 00:48:46 7 Bibliography 00:49:31 7.1 Theory 00:52:16 7.2 Textbooks 00:52:25 7.3 History of international relations 00:52:35 8 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= International relations (IR) or international affairs (IA) — commonly also referred to as international studies (IS), global studies (GS), or global affairs (GA) — is the study of interconnectedness of politics, economics and law on a global level. Depending on the academic institution, it is either a field of political science, an interdisciplinary academic field similar to global studies, or an entirely independent academic discipline in which students take a variety of internationally focused courses in social science and humanities disciplines. In all cases, the field studies relationships between political entities (polities) such as sovereign states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), international non-governmental organizations (INGOs), other non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs), and the wider world-systems produced by this interaction. International relations is an academic and a public policy field, and so can be positive and normative, because it analyses and formulates the foreign policy of a given state. As political activity, international relations dates from the time of the Greek historian Thucydides (c. 460–395 BC), and, in the early 20th century, became a discrete academic field (no. 5901 in the 4-digit UNESCO Nomenclature) within political science. In practice, international relations and international affairs forms a separate academic program or field from political science, and the courses taught therein are highly interdisciplinary.For example, international relations draws from the fields of politics, economics, international law, communication studies, history, demography, geography, sociology, anthropology, criminology, psychology, and gender studies. The scope of international relations encompasses issues such as globalization, diplomatic relations, state sovereignty, international security, ecological sustainability, nuclear proliferation, nationalism, economic development, global financ ...
Views: 3 Subhajit Sahu
2012 Western Illinois University Faculty Assembly
 
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Western Illinois University 2012 Faculty Assembly hosted by Provost and Academic Vice President Dr. Ken Hawkinson. Learn more about the Office of the Provost and Academic Vice President on Western Illinois University's website at http://www.wiu.edu/provost/
World currency
 
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In the foreign exchange market and international finance, a world currency, supranational currency, or global currency refers to a currency that is transacted internationally, with no set borders. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
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Harvard | Wikipedia audio article
 
37:28
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Harvard Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with about 6,700 undergraduate students and about 15,250 post graduate students. Established in 1636 and named for its first benefactor, clergyman John Harvard, Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning, and its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.The Harvard Corporation is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites. Following the American Civil War, President Charles W. Eliot's long tenure (1869–1909) transformed the college and affiliated professional schools into a modern research university; Harvard was a founding member of the Association of American Universities in 1900.A. Lawrence Lowell, who followed Eliot, further reformed the undergraduate curriculum and undertook aggressive expansion of Harvard's land holdings and physical plant. James Bryant Conant led the university through the Great Depression and World War II and began to reform the curriculum and liberalize admissions after the war. The undergraduate college became coeducational after its 1977 merger with Radcliffe College. The university is organized into eleven separate academic units—ten faculties and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study—with campuses throughout the Boston metropolitan area: its 209-acre (85 ha) main campus is centered on Harvard Yard in Cambridge, approximately 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Boston; the business school and athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located across the Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston and the medical, dental, and public health schools are in the Longwood Medical Area. Harvard's endowment is worth $37.1 billion, making it the largest of any academic institution.Harvard is a large, highly residential research university. The nominal cost of attendance is high, but the university's large endowment allows it to offer generous financial aid packages. The Harvard Library is the world's largest academic and private library system, comprising 79 individual libraries holding over 18 million items. The University is cited as one of the world's top tertiary institutions by various organizations.Harvard's alumni include eight U.S. presidents, more than thirty foreign heads of state, 62 living billionaires, 359 Rhodes Scholars, and 242 Marshall Scholars. As of October 2018, 158 Nobel laureates, 18 Fields Medalists, and 14 Turing Award winners have been affiliated as students, faculty, or researchers. In addition, Harvard students and alumni have won 10 Academy Awards, 48 Pulitzer Prizes, and 108 Olympic medals (46 gold, 41 silver and 21 bronze).
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List of political scientists | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_scientists 00:00:13 1 A 00:01:40 2 B 00:05:19 3 C 00:07:22 4 D 00:09:57 5 E 00:10:56 6 F 00:12:36 7 G 00:14:13 8 H 00:16:06 9 I 00:16:26 10 J 00:17:12 11 K 00:19:35 12 L 00:21:32 13 M 00:24:17 14 N 00:25:13 15 O 00:26:01 16 P 00:27:12 17 R 00:29:00 18 S 00:33:17 19 T 00:34:30 20 V 00:35:04 21 W 00:36:42 22 Y 00:37:06 23 Z 00:37:37 24 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8678993690627971 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= This is a list of notable political scientists. See the list of political theorists for those who study political theory. See also political science.
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University of Pennsylvania | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: University of Pennsylvania Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The University of Pennsylvania (Penn or UPenn) is a private Ivy League research university located in the University City section of West Philadelphia. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology, though his proposed curriculum was never adopted. The university coat of arms features a dolphin on the red chief, adopted directly from the Franklin family's own coat of arms. Penn was one of the first academic institutions to follow a multidisciplinary model pioneered by several European universities, concentrating multiple "faculties" (e.g., theology, classics, medicine) into one institution. It was also home to many other educational innovations. The first school of medicine in North America (Perelman School of Medicine, 1765), the first collegiate business school (Wharton School, 1881) and the first "student union" building and organization (Houston Hall, 1896) were founded at Penn. With an endowment of $12.21 billion (2017), Penn had the seventh largest endowment of all colleges in the United States. All of Penn's schools exhibit very high research activity. In fiscal year 2015, Penn's academic research budget was $851 million, involving more than 4,300 faculty, 1,100 postdoctoral fellows and 5,500 support staff/graduate assistants.As of 2018, distinguished alumni include 14 heads of state, 25 billionaires; 3 United States Supreme Court justices; 33 United States Senators, 42 United States Governors and 158 members of the U.S. House of Representatives; 8 signers of the United States Declaration of Independence; 12 signers of the United States Constitution, and the current President of the United States. In addition, some 35 Nobel laureates, 169 Guggenheim Fellows, 80 members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and many Fortune 500 CEOs have been affiliated with the university.
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Empire | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:21:07
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Empire Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An empire is a sovereign state functioning as an aggregate of nations or people that are ruled over by an emperor or another kind of monarch. The territory and population of an empire is commonly of greater extent than the one of a kingdom.An empire can be made solely of contiguous territories, such as the Austro-Hungarian Empire or the Russian Empire, or of territories far remote from the homeland, such as a colonial empire. Aside from the more formal usage, the word empire can also refer colloquially to a large-scale business enterprise (e.g. a transnational corporation), a political organisation controlled by a single individual (a political boss), or a group (political bosses). The word empire is associated with such other words as imperialism, colonialism, and globalization. Empire is often used to describe a displeasure to overpowering situations.An imperial political structure can be established and maintained in two ways: (i) as a territorial empire of direct conquest and control with force or (ii) as a coercive, hegemonic empire of indirect conquest and control with power. The former method provides greater tribute and direct political control, yet limits further expansion because it absorbs military forces to fixed garrisons. The latter method provides less tribute and indirect control, but avails military forces for further expansion. Territorial empires (e.g. the Mongol Empire and Median Empire) tend to be contiguous areas. The term, on occasion, has been applied to maritime empires or thalassocracies (e.g. the Athenian and British empires) with looser structures and more scattered territories.
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Lawrence Summers | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Lawrence Summers 00:03:53 1 Family and education 00:05:41 2 Career 00:05:50 2.1 Academic economist 00:06:55 2.2 Public official 00:07:18 2.3 Chief Economist at the World Bank 00:08:14 2.3.1 "Dirty industries" controversy 00:09:04 2.4 Service in the Clinton Administration 00:12:27 2.4.1 Views on banking regulation 00:14:40 2.5 President of Harvard 00:15:15 2.5.1 Cornel West affair 00:16:10 2.5.2 Differences between the sexes 00:19:22 2.5.3 Summers's opposition and support at Harvard 00:21:25 2.5.4 Support of economist Andrei Shleifer 00:24:00 2.5.5 Resignation as Harvard President 00:24:43 2.6 Post-Harvard presidency career 00:25:30 2.7 Business interests 00:26:34 2.8 National Economic Council 00:29:20 2.9 Post-NEC career 00:30:36 3 Candidacy for chairmanship of the Federal Reserve 00:31:26 4 In popular culture Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Lawrence Henry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist, former Vice President of Development Economics and Chief Economist of the World Bank (1991–93), senior U.S. Treasury Department official throughout President Clinton's administration (ultimately Treasury Secretary, 1999–2001), and former director of the National Economic Council for President Obama (2009–2010). He is a former president of Harvard University (2001–2006), where he is currently (as of March, 2017) a professor and director of the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.Born in New Haven, Connecticut, Summers became a professor of economics at Harvard University in 1983. He left Harvard in 1991, working as the Chief Economist at the World Bank from 1991 to 1993. In 1993, Summers was appointed Undersecretary for International Affairs of the United States Department of the Treasury under the Clinton Administration. In 1995, he was promoted to Deputy Secretary of the Treasury under his long-time political mentor Robert Rubin. In 1999, he succeeded Rubin as Secretary of the Treasury. While working for the Clinton administration Summers played a leading role in the American response to the 1994 economic crisis in Mexico, the 1997 Asian financial crisis, and the Russian financial crisis. He was also influential in the Harvard Institute for International Development and American-advised privatization of the economies of the post-Soviet states, and in the deregulation of the U.S financial system, including the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act. Following the end of Clinton's term, Summers served as the 27th President of Harvard University from 2001 to 2006. Summers resigned as Harvard's president in the wake of a no-confidence vote by Harvard faculty, which resulted in large part from Summers's conflict with Cornel West, financial conflict of interest questions regarding his relationship with Andrei Shleifer, and a 2005 speech in which he suggested that the under-representation of women in science and engineering could be due to a "different availability of aptitude at the high end", and less to patterns of discrimination and socialization. Remarking upon political correctness in institutions of higher education, Summers said in 2016, "There is a great deal of absurd political correctness. Now, I'm somebody who believes very strongly in diversity, who resists racism in all of its many incarnations, who thinks that there is a great deal that's unjust in American society that needs to be combated, but it seems to be that there is a kind of creeping totalitarianism in terms of what kind of ideas are acceptable and are debatable on college campuses."After his departure from Harvard, Summers worked as a managing partner at the hedge fund D. E. Shaw & Co., and as a freelance speaker at other financial institutions, including Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, Merrill Lynch and Lehman Brothers. Summers rejoined public service during the Obama administration, serving as the Director of the White House United States National Economi ...
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Empire | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:21:16
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Empire Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An empire is a sovereign state functioning as an aggregate of nations or people that are ruled over by an emperor or another kind of monarch. The territory and population of an empire is commonly of greater extent than the one of a kingdom.An empire can be made solely of contiguous territories, such as the Austro-Hungarian Empire or the Russian Empire, or of territories far remote from the homeland, such as a colonial empire. Aside from the more formal usage, the word empire can also refer colloquially to a large-scale business enterprise (e.g. a transnational corporation), a political organisation controlled by a single individual (a political boss), or a group (political bosses). The word empire is associated with such other words as imperialism, colonialism, and globalization. Empire is often used to describe a displeasure to overpowering situations.An imperial political structure can be established and maintained in two ways: (i) as a territorial empire of direct conquest and control with force or (ii) as a coercive, hegemonic empire of indirect conquest and control with power. The former method provides greater tribute and direct political control, yet limits further expansion because it absorbs military forces to fixed garrisons. The latter method provides less tribute and indirect control, but avails military forces for further expansion. Territorial empires (e.g. the Mongol Empire and Median Empire) tend to be contiguous areas. The term, on occasion, has been applied to maritime empires or thalassocracies (e.g. the Athenian and British empires) with looser structures and more scattered territories. This aspiration to universality resulted in conquest by converting 'outsiders' or 'inferiors' into the colonialized religion. This association of nationality and race became complex and has had a more intense drive for expansion.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
Harvard University | Wikipedia audio article
 
37:28
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Harvard University Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with about 6,700 undergraduate students and about 15,250 post graduate students. Established in 1636 and named for its first benefactor, clergyman John Harvard, Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning, and its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.The Harvard Corporation is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites. Following the American Civil War, President Charles W. Eliot's long tenure (1869–1909) transformed the college and affiliated professional schools into a modern research university; Harvard was a founding member of the Association of American Universities in 1900.A. Lawrence Lowell, who followed Eliot, further reformed the undergraduate curriculum and undertook aggressive expansion of Harvard's land holdings and physical plant. James Bryant Conant led the university through the Great Depression and World War II and began to reform the curriculum and liberalize admissions after the war. The undergraduate college became coeducational after its 1977 merger with Radcliffe College. The university is organized into eleven separate academic units—ten faculties and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study—with campuses throughout the Boston metropolitan area: its 209-acre (85 ha) main campus is centered on Harvard Yard in Cambridge, approximately 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Boston; the business school and athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located across the Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston and the medical, dental, and public health schools are in the Longwood Medical Area. Harvard's endowment is worth $37.1 billion, making it the largest of any academic institution.Harvard is a large, highly residential research university. The nominal cost of attendance is high, but the university's large endowment allows it to offer generous financial aid packages. The Harvard Library is the world's largest academic and private library system, comprising 79 individual libraries holding over 18 million items. The University is cited as one of the world's top tertiary institutions by various organizations.Harvard's alumni include eight U.S. presidents, more than thirty foreign heads of state, 62 living billionaires, 359 Rhodes Scholars, and 242 Marshall Scholars. As of October 2018, 158 Nobel laureates, 18 Fields Medalists, and 14 Turing Award winners have been affiliated as students, faculty, or researchers. In addition, Harvard students and alumni have won 10 Academy Awards, 48 Pulitzer Prizes, and 108 Olympic medals (46 gold, 41 silver and 21 bronze).
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Empire | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:20:44
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Empire 00:01:39 1 Definition 00:04:19 2 Characteristics 00:07:38 3 History of imperialism 00:07:48 3.1 Bronze and Iron Age empires 00:09:22 3.2 Classical period 00:16:00 3.3 Post-classical period 00:23:55 3.4 Colonial empires 00:25:19 3.5 Modern period 00:30:45 3.6 Transition from empire 00:34:40 4 Fall of empires 00:34:49 4.1 Roman Empire 00:36:48 5 Contemporary usage 00:41:44 6 Timeline of empires 00:42:51 7 Theoretical research 00:43:01 7.1 Empire versus nation state 00:47:37 7.2 Universal empire 00:58:39 7.3 Circumscription theory 01:05:46 7.4 Present 01:10:37 7.5 Future Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An empire is a sovereign state functioning as an aggregate of nations or people that are ruled over by an emperor or another kind of monarch. The territory and population of an empire is commonly of greater extent than the one of a kingdom.An empire can be made solely of contiguous territories, such as the Austro-Hungarian Empire or the Russian Empire, or of territories far remote from the homeland, such as a colonial empire. Aside from the more formal usage, the word empire can also refer colloquially to a large-scale business enterprise (e.g. a transnational corporation), a political organisation controlled by a single individual (a political boss), or a group (political bosses). The word empire is associated with such other words as imperialism, colonialism, and globalization. Empire is often used to describe a displeasure to overpowering situations.An imperial political structure can be established and maintained in two ways: (i) as a territorial empire of direct conquest and control with force or (ii) as a coercive, hegemonic empire of indirect conquest and control with power. The former method provides greater tribute and direct political control, yet limits further expansion because it absorbs military forces to fixed garrisons. The latter method provides less tribute and indirect control, but avails military forces for further expansion. Territorial empires (e.g. the Mongol Empire and Median Empire) tend to be contiguous areas. The term, on occasion, has been applied to maritime empires or thalassocracies (e.g. the Athenian and British empires) with looser structures and more scattered territories.
Views: 7 wikipedia tts
Indian Americans | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Indian Americans 00:00:34 1 Terminology 00:01:48 2 Indian American immigration 00:01:58 2.1 18th century 00:02:15 2.2 19th century 00:02:59 2.3 20th century 00:05:40 2.4 21st century 00:05:49 3 Demographics 00:09:01 3.1 U.S. metropolitan areas with large Asian Indian populations 00:09:33 3.2 List of U.S. states by population of Asian Indians 00:09:40 4 Statistics on Indians in the U.S. 00:12:25 5 Socioeconomic status 00:13:09 5.1 Education 00:13:38 5.2 Household income 00:14:30 6 Culture 00:14:39 6.1 Entertainment 00:17:00 6.2 Religions 00:18:19 6.2.1 Indian Hindus 00:19:35 6.2.2 Indian Christians 00:20:59 6.2.3 Indian Muslims 00:21:20 6.2.4 Indian Sikhs 00:22:47 6.2.5 Others 00:23:38 6.3 Ethnicity 00:24:55 6.4 Linguistic affiliation 00:25:33 7 Immigration and progression timeline 00:25:43 7.1 Timeline 00:42:26 7.2 Classification 00:43:51 7.3 Citizenship 00:44:14 8 Current social issues 00:44:23 8.1 Discrimination 00:48:13 8.2 Illegal immigration 00:48:59 8.3 Immigration 00:51:14 8.4 Media 00:51:22 9 Politics 00:53:39 10 Notable people 00:53:48 11 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Indian Americans or Indo-Americans, are Americans whose ancestry belongs to any of the many ethnic groups of the Republic of India. According to 2016 American Community Survey data, Indian Americans are the third-largest Asian group in the United States alone or in combination with other races after Chinese Americans and Filipino Americans. The U.S. Census Bureau uses the term Asian Indian to avoid confusion with the indigenous peoples of the Americas commonly referred to as American Indians (or Native Americans or Amerindians).
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