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30   distress signals by radio
 
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The most common way of sending a distress signal is by radio. Modern radios conform to the GMDSS (Global Maritime Distress and Safety System). GMDSS is an international system that uses terrestrial and satellite technology and ship board radio systems to allow rapid response in an emergency situation. Nowadays distress messages can be initiated digitally by pressing the call button on the radio set. Radio sets which are not according to the GMDSS standard transmit a distress message by voice on channel 16 on a VHF transmitter, or on 2182 kHz on an MF transmitter. The reception range of a VHF transmitter to a coastal station averages 35 nautical miles and between an MF transmitter and a coastal station 150 nautical miles. If you or your vessel are in grave and immediate danger use the MAYDAY call. MAYDAY is the internationally recognized radiotelephony distress signal for a person or a vessel in grave and imminent danger.
Basic VHF and UHF Fundamentals
 
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Basic VHF and UHF Fundamentals Antennas are a very important component of communication systems. By definition, an antenna is a device used to transform an RF signal, traveling on a conductor, into an electromagnetic wave in free space. Antennas demonstrate a property known as reciprocity, which means that an antenna will maintain the same characteristics regardless if it is transmitting or receiving. Most antennas are resonant devices, which operate efficiently over a relatively narrow frequency band. An antenna must be tuned to the same frequency band of the radio system to which it is connected, otherwise the reception and the transmission will be impaired. When a signal is fed into an antenna, the antenna will emit radiation distributed in space in a certain way. A graphical representation of the relative distribution of the radiated power in space is called a radiation pattern.
Views: 199155 Dan Vanevenhoven
VHF vs UHF - What's the difference
 
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VHF vs UHF - What's the difference We often get calls pertaining to Two-Way radios and our asked what is the difference between UHF ( Ultra High Frequency ) and VHF ( Very High Frequency ), well in today's video we hope we can help clarify and explain the difference between these two radio frequencies. More or less just a small increase of electromagnetic waves but also the length and duration of the signal. I've taken the liberty of providing a variety of other links below that might help you to further understanding this topic. As well I've attached a link that takes you directly to our website where we offer phenomenal pricing on just about every two-way radio battery to date. As well our house brand UHF DSR-590 Two- Way radio. Please Like, Subscribe and Comment with any questions you may have! FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/bigtimebattery/ Two-Way Radio FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/dsrtwowayradio/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigtimebattery YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHOfamYiFN4vINQf2zpenZA Website: http://bigtimebattery.com/store/ICOM_ICF4001_UHF_handheld_radio.html ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Helpful Links http://www.audio-technica.com/cms/site/af9d127e26abf498/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABGnx3EyHmQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g331FDP8_cA
Visual Distress Signals VDSs
 
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A distress signal, also known as a distress call, is an internationally recognized means for obtaining help. Distress signals are communicated by transmitting radio signals, displaying a visually observable item or illumination, or making a sound audible from a distance. A distress signal indicates that a person or group of people, ship, aircraft, or other vehicle is threatened by serious and/or imminent danger and requires immediate assistance.[1]:PCG D−3 Use of distress signals in other circumstances may be against local or international law. An urgency signal is available to request assistance in less critical situations. In order for distress signalling to be the most effective, two parameters must be communicated: Alert or notification of a distress in progress Position or location (or localization or pinpointing) of the party in distress. For example, a single aerial flare alerts observers to the existence of a vessel in distress somewhere in the general direction of the flare sighting on the horizon but extinguishes within one minute or less. A hand-held flare burns for three minutes and can be used to localize or pinpoint more precisely the exact location or position of the party in trouble. An EPIRB both notifies or alerts authorities and at the same time provides position indication information. Distress can be indicated by any of the following officially sanctioned methods: • Transmitting a spoken voice Mayday message by radio over very high frequency channel 16 (156.8 MHz) and/or high frequency on 2182 kHz • Transmitting a digital distress signal by activating (or pressing) the distress button (or key) on a marine radio equipped with Digital Selective Calling (DSC) over the VHF (channel 70) and/or HF frequency bands. • Transmitting a digital distress signal by activating (or pressing) the distress button (or key) on an Inmarsat-C satellite internet device • Sending the Morse code group SOS (▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄) by light flashes or sounds • Burning a red flare (either hand-held or aerial parachute flare) • Launching distress rockets • Emitting orange smoke from a canister • Showing flames on the vessel (as from a burning tar barrel, oil barrel, etc.) • Raising and lowering slowly and repeatedly both arms outstretched to each side • Making a continuous sound with any fog-signalling apparatus • Firing a gun or other explosive signal at intervals of about a minute • Flying the international maritime signal flags NC • Displaying a visual signal consisting of a square flag having above or below it a ball or anything resembling a ball (round or circular in appearance) #SOS #VDSs #DistressSignals Don't Forget to Subscribe Us Like Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarineOnlineYoutube Follow Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarineOnlineYou Follow Google+ https://plus.google.com/107450234425940445683 Website: https://marineonlineyou.blogspot.com/
Views: 1380 Marine Online
Military and Maritime HF radio signals
 
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Some random radio signal I came across while tuning around the HF band on one of my SDR's
Views: 573 ElfNet Designs
Boating Safety - Using a Marine Radio
 
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To View the Next Video in this Series Please Click Here: http://www.monkeysee.com/play/2810-boating-safety-visual-distress-signals
Views: 10832 MonkeySee
How to Extend The Range of Walkie-Talkie Portable Handheld Radios.
 
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Three tips on how to extend the range of handheld radios. Please see: https://www.patreon.com/radioprepper
Views: 105247 Radio Prepper
Radio Propagation 101
 
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This video gives you the basics of Radio Propagation: Basic information that includes Sun Spots, Solar flux, K and A factors Why should you be interested in propagation? Well if you want to make those DX contacts you will need to be aware of when propagation is best for conditions to your target. One way to do this is to listen. Another is to check propagation sources such as WWV mentioned above. You can also get familiar with the propagation tables presented monthly in QST and CQ magazines. These charts will tell you when to expect the best propagation on what bands and at what time for your location to other areas of the world. An excellent source is to check the DX clusters online or by packet radio. This can give you current information about DX activity that is happening right now.
Views: 116374 Dan Vanevenhoven
Northstar NS100DS demonstration VHF FM marine radio
 
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This is the Northstar NS-100DS dual-station VHF marine radio. The NS100 is a quality VHF marine radio that you will mostly find on the higher end pleasure vessels as well as commercial vessels. It is very easy to install due to the modular concept of this radio. It is compatible with the latest DSC standard and has a standard NMEA interface for connecting it to a GPS receiver (or to the navigation center already present in your boat). The DSC capability allows you to do selective calling to other stations, or to send out an automated distress call where your GPS coordinates will be transmitted automatically to coast guard ground stations. As you can imagine, DSC can be a real life saver in emergency situations.
Views: 2289 LifeIsTooShortForQRP
How to use VHF marine radio
 
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The ACMA has produced an educational video for the recreational boating community about how, and why it is important, to operate your VHF marine radio correctly. Hook Line and Sinker presenters Nick Duigan and Andrew Hart talk to Marine Rescue NSW volunteer Greg Searle about how to use a VHF marine radio in an emergency.
Views: 226756 acmadotgov
How to Use Marine VHF Radio
 
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Watch more Disaster Survival & Worst-Case Scenarios videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/383525-How-to-Use-Marine-VHF-Radio Having a Marine radio can be critical when operating a boat on any type of water. There are many uses for a Marine radio, but the most important is to send a distress signal -- here's how to do it. Step 1: Call distress signal Tune your marine radio to channel 16 and call out the word "mayday" three times in a row. This is the international hailing and distress frequency. Tip Collect as much information as you can about your vessel, your condition, and your location before making a distress call. Step 2: Name your vessel Call out the name of your vessel by saying "This is" and then repeating the name of your vessel three times in a row. Tip Call out your call sign and registration number once each if you know them. Step 3: Repeat mayday and name Repeat "mayday" and the name of the vessel once more. Step 4: Give position Give the position of your vessel finding your latitude and longitude on a nautical chart, and approximate distance to a known landmark or island. Tip Give your bearing information by describing the direction you're heading using your compass. Step 5: Describe your condition Describe the nature of your distress by saying something like, "struck a submerged object," "taking on water," or "fire on board." Step 6: Describe what you need Describe any specific assistance you might need, like medical attention for someone on board, or pumps needed to remove water. Step 7: Describe number of people on board Describe how many people are on board, their age if pertinent, and their condition. Step 8: Give other information Give any other pieces of information that may further assist the rescuer. Then end the call with the word "over." Step 9: Switch channels Switch to a mutually decided on, free channel once you have established contact with a rescuer. Simply call out a switch to a numbered channel and then tune to that channel to continue communicating with the rescuer. Did You Know? The distress signal "mayday" was created in 1923 by Fredrick Stanley Mockford, based on the French word m'aider, which means "come help me."
Views: 5818 Howcast
How to use a marine radio
 
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Different types of marine radios and how/when to use them. Check out https://www.clubmarine.com.au for more boating advice and information.
Views: 7219 Club Marine TV
What is MARINE VHF RADIO? What does MARINE VHF RADIO mean? MARINE VHF RADIO meaning
 
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What is MARINE VHF RADIO? What does MARINE VHF RADIO mean? MARINE VHF RADIO meaning - MARINE VHF RADIO definition - MARINE VHF RADIO explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Marine VHF radio refers to the radio frequency range between 156.0 and 174 MHz, inclusive. The "VHF" signifies the very high frequency of the range. In the official language of the International Telecommunication Union the band is called the VHF maritime mobile band. In some countries additional channels are used, such as the L and F channels for leisure and fishing vessels in the Nordic countries (at 155.5–155.825 MHz). Marine VHF radio equipment is installed on all large ships and most seagoing small craft. It is also used, with slightly different regulation, on rivers and lakes. It is used for a wide variety of purposes, including summoning rescue services and communicating with harbours, locks, bridges and marinas. A marine VHF set is a combined transmitter and receiver and only operates on standard, international frequencies known as channels. Channel 16 (156.8 MHz) is the international calling and distress channel. Transmission power ranges between 1 and 25 watts, giving a maximum range of up to about 60 nautical miles (111 km) between aerials mounted on tall ships and hills, and 5 nautical miles (9 km; 6 mi) between aerials mounted on small boats at sea level. Frequency modulation (FM) is used, with vertical polarization, meaning that antennas have to be vertical in order to have good reception. Modern-day marine VHF radios offer not only basic transmit and receive capabilities. Permanently mounted marine VHF radios on seagoing vessels are required to have certification of some level of "Digital Selective Calling" (DSC) capability, to allow a distress signal to be sent with a single button press. Marine VHF mostly uses "simplex" transmission, where communication can only take place in one direction at a time. A transmit button on the set or microphone determines whether it is operating as a transmitter or a receiver. Some channels, however, are "duplex" transmission channels where communication can take place in both directions simultaneously when the equipment on both ends allow it (full duplex), otherwise "semi-duplex" is used. Each duplex channel has two frequency assignments. Duplex channels can be used to place calls on the public telephone system for a fee via a marine operator. When full duplex is used, the call is similar to one using a mobile phone or landline. When semi-duplex is used, voice is only carried one way at a time and the party on the boat must press the transmit button only when speaking. This facility is still available in some areas, though its use has largely died out with the advent of mobile and satellite phones. Marine VHF radios can also receive weather radio broadcasts, where they are available.
Views: 2087 The Audiopedia
M/S Estonia Mayday Call With Subtitles, Tribute
 
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MS Estonia Mayday Call With Subtitles, Tribute R.I.P. ESTONIA, 1980-1994 Estonia was sunk in the september 28th, 1994 at 1:50 AM. (GMT +2) At the time of the accident there were 989 people on the ship, of whom 852 lost their lives. The wreck rests in about 80 meters of water. The wreck is located approximately 22 nautical miles (40 kilometres) south-southeast of the island of Utö. May they all rest in peace.
Views: 1088988 Memorial Palace
Online Marine VHF Radio Course - Phonetic Alphabet
 
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RYA Online VHF Radio Course how to use the Phonetic Alphabet. www.seavoice-training.co.uk
Views: 147 Seavoice Training
HF SSB marine radio Raytheon RAY-152 (same as JRC JSB-176)
 
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This is the Raytheon Ray-152, a professional HF SSB marine radio. It shares most of its DNA wit the well known JRC JST-135 radio that was sold in the ham market. The Ray-152 is an excellent performer. Se the videos for the details.
Views: 11546 LifeIsTooShortForQRP
Setting up a Marine VHF DSC radio
 
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Setting up a Marine VHF DSC Radio with Seavoice Training http://www.seavoice-training.co.uk/
Views: 8857 Seavoice Training
blue marine radio signal
 
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this is a deep ambient house track i made on my new korg m3 keyboard with exb radius
Views: 122 syntheticdj
Radio morse code in the merchant navy
 
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Receiving QTC from Athinai Radio/SVA/SVF, on board, MV Handy Carrier/9HJV2. (1990)
Views: 82329 IOANNIS KARAPAVLOS
Mayday Distress Call: How To
 
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Mayday is an international marine emergency code word for distress in voice communications. The term is derived from the french term venez m'aider, which translates to, "come help me". Calling mayday over the marine VHF (very high frequency) radio signals emergency response crews such as the Coast Guard, Police, Firefighters, and Marine Assistance firms of a marine emergency. The protocol is as follows: MAYDAY (X3), THIS IS, VESSEL NAME (X3), MAYDAY WE ARE LOCATED (LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE) BEARING AND DISTANCE FROM NAVIGATIONAL AID NUMBER OF PERSONS ON BOARD (HEALTH AND PFD STATUS) NATURE OF EMERGENCY, ANY FURTHER DETAILS MAYDAY X3 OVER.
Views: 26462 TowBoat911
Ham Radio Basics--What is SSB and How to Tune in SSB
 
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Jim, W6LG, answers the question, "What is SSB?" And, how do you tune in an SSB signal?
Views: 34357 Jim W6LG
Ham Radio - Decoding marine weather fax using FLdigi on HF
 
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Link to the black cat info on receiving. (not fldigi related.) http://www.blackcatsystems.com/software/multimode/fax.html#NMF Link to the PDF with stations, frequencies, and schedules. http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/marine/rfax.pdf If you like my videos, please subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/user/loughkb?sub_confirmation=1 If you want me to keep making more videos like this, consider becoming my patron at Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/kb9rlw/ Discuss this and other videos on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kb9rlw/ Hit me up on the echolink repeater down by my house: W9TE (Node: 519521)
Views: 5810 Kevin Loughin
VHF Marine Radio - DSC Radio USCG- Pt. 1
 
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How does DSC Work? Marine Radio DSC Course for emergency radio operation - US Coast Guard Humboldt Bay Ca. April 22nd 2009 Information on the operation, of DSC (Digital Selective Calling) for Maritime operation. Lt. Parkhurst, USCG discusses the operation of MMSI and other information - Part 1 For more information and documentation, visit: http://humboldttuna.com/smf/index.php?topic=2050.0
Views: 35534 RadioLabs
Marine radio
 
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Example of Kenwood radio that is setup to indicate three levels of marine radio signal: very strong (line-of-sight), strong, weak.
Views: 21 Steven Glubis
GX1500E Marine Radio Repair.  (Cross-Polarised??)
 
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This is me fixing a Standard Horizon Quest-X GX1500E Marine Band Radio. First thoughts were blown diode and a few blown caps, but it turned out to be more than that... Here is a list of the parts I replaced: Main Board: Q1018 - 2SB1301 Q1019 - NJM7808L1A (8v reg) Q1017 - NJM78M05 (5v reg) D1003 - 1N5402 (protection diode) C1092 - 100uf 25v C1092 - 100uf 25v (10v on schematic ?) C1023 - 2200uf 25v CPU Board: Q2001 - ULA78L05ACPK (5v reg) C2002 - 10uf 25v Service manual I used was for the GX1500S, which as far as I can tell is identical, just programmed differently. Radio is now fully working on RX. There is no transmit, but as this video is already over 30 mins, I decided to end here... I hope to be able to fix that in a future video. This is the official channel of http://www.normsweb.com
Views: 1832 Normsweb.com
How to use VHF marine radio for weather information
 
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The ACMA collaborated with the Bureau of Meteorology to produce an educational weather-related marine radio video. Boaters should always check the weather before setting sail and whilst at sea, by listening on their VHF marine radio.
Views: 36868 acmadotgov
ScotSail VHF Marine Radio Licence - Pan Pan Voice Call
 
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RYA/MCA VHF (SRC) DSC Marine Radio Licence - 1-Day Radio Licence For Operators of Small Leisure and Commercial Craft. This video is of a Pan Pan call, after having sent a DSC Urgency Alert. This demonstration is conducted by a VHF SRC Radio Licence Assessor on a Simrad RD68 Fixed DSC Radio.
Views: 11302 MrScotSail
DIY RF Signal Generator
 
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I built my own RF signal generator by following plans from a Nuts and Volts magazine. In this video, I show how the RF generator works and I go through some of the circuit boards and components installed inside. The RF Generator works from approximately 188 KHz to 125 MHz. I'm hoping this RF signal generator will be useful for numerous tube-related projects (radios, etc, that need alignment). The RF generator is based on an MC1648 voltage controlled oscillator chip and a varactor diode. See my electronics blog at http://www.smbaker.com/
Views: 42103 smbakeryt
LIVE NOW! - Marine VHF (Scanning 156 MHz to 157 MHz)
 
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Bristol Channel Radio is the home of radio signals received in the Bristol Channel area of the UK. The signals include HAM Radio, Air Band, ADS-B, Marine VHF, and various other non-commercial stations. The signals are received a short distance north of Chepstow, using an RTL dongle from RTL-SDR.com, the V3 model. (DVB-T + DAB + FM + SDR - RTL2832U R820T2 TCXO + BIAS T + HF) The UHF/VHF antenna is a stainless steel Royal Discone and/or a cheap Ebay receiver antenna, a 1m vertical which seems to work well for local signals. The antenna for HF is a 20m Longwire with an 9:1 UnUn. For more information about RTL-SDR tuners, visit this great website: http://www.rtl-sdr.com/ This channel is provided for research and/or educational purposes, but general interest viewers are most welcome. Please go ahead and LIKE, SHARE, and SUBSCRIBE, your support is appreciated! Bristol Channel Radio do not claim any rights whatsoever on any rights protected material heard in any of it's live steams / videos. If any affected material is heard within any Bristol Channel Radio content, this is unintentional, and will be removed upon request from the rights owner/s. If you would like to use any content from this channel for any purpose (outside of general viewing on YouTube,) you MUST seek written consent from Bristol Channel Radio before doing so.
Views: 1033 BCRLiveStream
Relay Tower 0MC-810 - The Default & Separated Family Radio Signals
 
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Subscribe!: http://oxhorn.it/youtube-subscribe-to-oxhorn Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oxhorn Join Ox's Discord Community: https://discord.gg/GE4EcFX My Twitch: http://www.twitch.tv/scotchandsmokerings Mods Used: http://oxhorn.it/mods-used Oxhorn's Free Fallout 4 Settlement Happiness Calculator: http://oxhorn.it/happiness-calculator My Fantasy Novel: http://www.cloranhastings.com/ ALL of my settlements and their status: http://oxhorn.it/settlement-status
Views: 154124 Oxhorn
HOW TO MAKE A MAYDAY MARINE RADIO DISTRESS CALL
 
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Radio Distress Calling USED ONLY if in Grave or Imminent Danger * MAYDAY * MAYDAY * MAYDAY * THIS IS (name of vessel & call sign - spoken 3 times) * MAYDAY name of vessel & call sign, location, nature of distress, persons on board, EPIRB activated
Views: 6748 theVhfradiocourse
How Does An Antenna Work? | weBoost
 
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*** It is with sadness that we share that Don, the person featured in this video, passed away in December 2017. Don was a Navy veteran and a valued member of our product engineering team since 2004. He will be greatly missed. Have you ever asked: How does an antenna work anyway? If you have, then you will want to watch this 4-minute video. We ask a guy who designs and tests antennas, Don with weBoost, how antennas work. In the video he explains how an antenna works and why. So whether you're just curious and want an answer to 'how do antennas work.' Or if you want a little background before shopping for the best antenna for your needs, this short video explanation by Don the Antenna Engineer is a good place to start. To learn more about signal boosters visit: https://www.weboost.com/us/ Subscribe to our channel to be in the know when we release our weekly videos. Including Tips, how-to and more. Read more on our blog: https://www.weboost.com/us/news/blog/how-does-an-antenna-work/
Views: 632614 weBoost
SEA 235 HF SSB marine & ham radio with IF DSP and DDS
 
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This is the SEA-235 HF SSB marine radio, 150 watts USB/LSB/CW and FSK (RTTY). This radio was made in the USA by Stephens Engineering Associations (SEA). The radio is state of the art; it has an IF-DSP (all filters and modulation/demodulation are done in the digital domain) and it uses a DDS (Direct Digital Synthesizer) allowing for 10 Hz finest step resolution. Also, the radio has 200 non-volatile, user-programmable memory locations. The one you see here in this video is like new, it has never been used mobile and/or on a ship so there is NO corrosion. The primary target market for this radio was marine applications, for use on high-sea going vessels. But it also has an (undocumented) "amateur" mode, which means the engineers who designed this radio were probably hams! Because of this ham mode, the radio is extremely usable on the HF ham bands, as this video will show. In the "marine" (default) mode, it offers almost a thousand pre-programmed marine frequencies (channels if you want), for use in any region in the world.
Views: 1111 LifeIsTooShortForQRP
Rugged Radios: CB vs VHF
 
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Greg Cottrell, owner of Rugged Radios talks with Fred Williams of Petersen's 4-Wheel and Offroad Magazine and Dirt Every Day about the advantages of VHF Radios over CB's. Greg discusses the advantages of VHF radios in terms of power, distance, signal quality, size, and more as Fred preps his Jeep for the 2016 Ultimate Adventure. In 2016, Ultimate Adventure implemented a "no CB" rule and all participants were provided VHF radios by Rugged Radios.
Views: 26484 Rugged Radios
How to get a MMSI number for your VHF or check if the boat has one
 
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How to get a MMSI number for your boat, where and how to register with the FCC if you boat in international waters. www.BoatingCruising.com has links to the FCC web-pages. Go to www.BoatingCruising.com then the Tools/Links tab Also how to check if the boat has an MMSI number from the previous owner if staying within the USA https://www.boatus.com/mmsi International - http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/?pageName=mtMmsi
Views: 42480 Vagabond Epicurean
What is SSB USB and LSB modes
 
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Understanding what is Single Side Band, Lower Sideband and Upper Sideband signals
Views: 89737 OfficialSWLchannel
Tuning Single Sideband (SSB)
 
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Single Sideband (SSB) presents some unique challenges to the new amateur radio operator. You can read all you want in books, but it's still hard. This video demonstrates how it's done and what it should sound like.
Views: 23194 David Casler
I-Com M802 SSB Marine radio with Icom AT 140 tuner
 
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Video showing a I-Com M802 radio in action checking email via SCS PTC-IIusb pactor modem. A 2000nm link from the Marshall Islands to Hawaii. Icom M802 SSB for sale
Views: 18526 David Kane
Using a PC sound card to receive VLF radio signals
 
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Just connect an antenna to your computer's microphone input, and you can receive VLF (Very Low Frequency) radio signals! A sound card (or built-in sound chip) with a recording sampling rate of at least 96 kHz is recommended. Example of using this method to receive VLF signals from Russia and Europe: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKSOoZ2vhvo SDR Sharp software (for Windows) to receive and record VLF (and many other) radio signals: http://sdrsharp.com/#download Similar SDR (Software Defined Radio) applications are available for Linux and Mac OS. Lists of VLF stations: http://sidstation.loudet.org/stations-list-en.xhtml http://www.smeter.net/stations/vlf-stations.php Common sources of radio interference and recommended solutions: http://www.ccrane.com/!wcjHVrOwu6BDBDjo39xwNw!/AM-Antennas About the accidental recording of VLF station GBR (16 kHz) contained on Mike Oldfield's "Tubular Bells" album: http://alancordwell.co.uk/personal/index.php http://gkircher.stormloader.com/vlfcd/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rugby_Radio_Station
Views: 87771 VWestlife
Can You Listen To The UK Police?
 
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Connect with me: ►Youtube (Second Channel) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgmM3bprh_50fG-L-zG9XEQ/ ►Instagram https://www.instagram.com/m3hhyofficial ►Twitter https://www.twitter.com/OfficialM3HHY ►Youtube https://www.youtube.com/user/RINGWAYMANCHESTER/videos ►Blog https://www.distantsignalradio.blogspot.co.uk/
Views: 98590 Ringway Manchester
How to Find Radio Signal Sources | Fallout 4 Tips & Tricks
 
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Here's a guide on finding the source of radio signals out in the Fallout 4 wilderness. The basics are: turn on the radio to the signal you want, walk around until the broadcast becomes clear. Simple as that! This will be an ongoing series in which I make quick guides for Fallout 4 as I learn new things. Subscribe for more! Links: http://twitter.com/MisterGruntle http://twitch.tv/MisterGruntle
Views: 9700 Mister Gruntle
HAM Radio VHF
 
04:19:11
Radio signals received in the Bristol Channel area of the UK. The signals you will hear include HAM Radio, Air Band, ADS-B (no audio), Marine VHF, and various other VHF / UHF stations. The signals are received a short distance north of Chepstow, using an RTL dongle from RTL-SDR.com, the V3 model. (DVB-T + DAB + FM + SDR - RTL2832U R820T2 TCXO + BIAS T + HF) The antenna is a cheap Ebay receiver antenna, a 1m vertical which seems to work well for local VHF/UHF. For more information about RTL-SDR tuners, visit this great website: http://www.rtl-sdr.com/ This channel is provided for research and/or educational purposes, but general interest viewers are most welcome. Please go ahead and LIKE, SHARE, and SUBSCRIBE, your support is appreciated! Bristol Channel Radio do not claim any rights whatsoever on any rights protected material heard in any of it's live steams / videos. If any affected material is heard within any Bristol Channel Radio content, this is unintentional, and will be removed upon request from the rights owner/s. If you would like to use any content from this channel for any purpose (outside of general viewing on YouTube,) you MUST seek written consent from Bristol Channel Radio before doing so.
Views: 35 BCRLiveStream
Marine radio qualifications
 
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Are you a boater who uses a VHF marine radio in Australian Territorial Waters (within 12 nautical miles of the coast)? You’re now able to apply for a more appropriate marine radio qualification—the Australian Waters Qualification (AWQ)—which the ACMA recently approved for inclusion in the marine radio class licence. How do I obtain the AWQ? The AWQ is a unit of competency (MARC019) included in the Maritime Training Package, which was approved by the Department of Industry on 27 February 2015. A copy of the syllabus is available at http:// training.gov.au/Training/Details/MARC019 The AWQ is available from any registered training organisation (RTO) that has included it on its scope. Most volunteer marine rescue groups are either an RTO in their own right or have a relationship with an RTO, so they can test boaters for the AWQ and issue a statement of attainment. A list of RTOs who have included the Maritime Training Package on their scope is available from the training.gov website To help you easily learn about correct VHF marine radio procedures and protocols, an online training package has been developed— this series of lessons teaches you the right information in your own time and at your own pace. The package assesses what you’ve learned and advises when you’re ready to sit the actual exam. You can download the AWQ training package at: http://www.anzsbeg.com.au/index.php/safety-equipment/marine-radios/awq-training-package/
Views: 11602 acmadotgov
Marine Radio (HF) on 8.764 mhz upper sideband
 
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Long distance marine radio, over the horizon storm warnings.
Views: 312 Tim Olson
VHF Low Band Skip - DX in Colorado from Deep South USA 1982
 
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Recording of radio signals received in Colorado in 1982 presumably from the southeast United States. The signals received were in the VHF Low Band at 33, 35 and 37 Mhz. Occurred during Solar Cycle 21.
Views: 340 ClassicScanner
Standard Horizon GX5500S Quantum Marine VHF Radio: An Overview
 
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Standard Horizon GX5500S Quantum Marine VHF Radio is available at PSICOMPANY.COM. Call 1.800.826.2907 More Information on Standard Horizon GX5500S Quantum Marine VHF Radio: http://www.psicompany.com/standard-horizon-gx5500s-quantum-vhf-radio-with-dsc/ ● Bluetooth Headset capable ● 30 Watt PA/Loud Hailer with preprogrammed fog signals and listen back ● Bass and Treble tone control ● IUT-R M493-12 VHF with commercial grade 80dB receiver ● Full dot matrix LCD display ● Submersible JIS-7 / IPX7 (3.3 feet for 30 minutes) ● Independent Channel 70 receiver built-in for continuous DSC watch ● LAT/LON, SOG and COG shown on display when connected to GPS ● Removable ClearVoice noise canceling speaker mic with channel selection and 16/9 key ● Front panel speaker microphone can be relocated to rear panel using optional MEK-4 ● Versatile user-programmable scanning, priority scan and Dual Watch ● Voice Scrambler (optional) ● One-button access to Channel 16 and 9 ● Large rotary knobs, and oversized display ● Capable of connecting to RAM3 or VH-310 second station optional Remote Access Mic ● Intercom between radio and second station microphone ● Overall Dimensions: 3.5"H x 9.1"W x 5.9"D ● Flush Mount Cutout: 2.8"H x 8.1"W ● 3-Year Waterproof Warranty Standard Horizon GX5500S Quantum Marine VHF Radio with Large LCD Display, Class D DSC, Scan, Submersible, 30 Watt PA, a full powered 25 watt VHF, with all US, International and Canadian channels, as well as NOAA Weather Channels, Programmable, 12 VDC Standard Horizon Model: GX5500S Quantum More Information on Standard Horizon GX5500S Quantum Marine VHF Radio ● Standard Horizon GX5500S Quantum Marine VHF Radio Dimension Drawing ● Standard Horizon GX5500S Quantum Marine VHF Radio Operator Manual Standard Horizon GX5500S Quantum Marine VHF Radio Features: ● Bluetooth Headset capable ● 30 Watt PA/Loud Hailer with preprogrammed fog signals and listen back ● Bass and Treble tone control ● IUT-R M493-12 VHF with commercial grade 80dB receiver ● Full dot matrix LCD display ● Submersible JIS-7 / IPX7 (3.3 feet for 30 minutes) ● Independent Channel 70 receiver built-in for continuous DSC watch ● LAT/LON, SOG and COG shown on display when connected to GPS ● Removable ClearVoice noise canceling speaker mic with channel selection and 16/9 key ● Front panel speaker microphone can be relocated to rear panel using optional MEK-4 ● Versatile user-programmable scanning, priority scan and Dual Watch ● Voice Scrambler (optional) ● One-button access to Channel 16 and 9 ● Large rotary knobs, and oversized display ● Capable of connecting to RAM3 or VH-310 second station optional Remote Access Mic ● Intercom between radio and second station microphone ● Overall Dimensions: 3.5"H x 9.1"W x 5.9"D ● Flush Mount Cutout: 2.8"H x 8.1"W ● 3-Year Waterproof Warranty Standard Horizon GX5500S Quantum Marine VHF Radio HD Video Playlist: Optional Bluetooth® wireless headset Kit (BTK-2) with PTT or VOX With the optional BTK-2 kit (includes BH-2 headset, BU-1 Bluetooth unit and CAB-2 charger)the GX5500S becomes hands free and can be used up to 30 Feet away. Alphanumeric keypad The keypad allows quick access to most often used functions, input of DSC names, manual entering of GPS position and direct entry of channels. Class D Digital Selective Calling The GX5500S meets the requirements for Class D with a separate Channel 70 receiver, which allows DSC calls to be received even when listening to traffic on Marine VHF channels. The DSC DISTRESS function when activated transmits a digital MAYDAY including vessel identification, Latitude / Longitude and time (with GPS connected), to facilitate prompt response. Additional calls that can be made are Individual, Urgency and Safety. Commerical grade 80dB receiver Advanced receiver technology rejects the reception of unwanted signals from pagers and other unwanted VHF frequencies. Audio tone control This unique feature allows the treble and bass of the speaker audio to be adjusted for best listening. The effect is similar to adjusting the treble and bass controls on a stereo. Oversized knobs and scanning Radio operation and channel selection is made easy (even with gloves) with the oversized volume, squelch and channel selector knobs. See us at: http://www.psicompany.com/standard-horizon/
Views: 1787 BuyStandardHorizon
New Orleans to encrypt police radio signals starting Feb. 1
 
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OPCD has had the technology in place to encrypt all public safety transmissions for years, but has not done so. In 2012, the NOPD announced it would begin scrambling its signal along with Jefferson Parish and other local public safety agencies, but then-M
Views: 379 WWLTV
West Marine - VHF250 Multiband Handheld VHF Radio
 
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Use your VHF on your boat or on land with VHF and FRS capability! Packed with all the features of the VHF150, the VHF250 takes you to the next level of VHF technology and performance. The versatile VHF250 makes it just as easy to communicate from ship to shore as from ship to ship with FRS transceiver capabilities. And with AM, FM and aircraft band reception you can listen to AM or FM radio stations or aircraft band transmissions, including emergency locator beacon signals. Like the VHF150, its large dot-matrix backlit display, menu-based system and up/down arrows make one-hand operation easy. Its JIS 8compliant: Rated as waterproof in 1.5 meters of water. Features a watertight speaker/mic jack and a keypad lock to prevent accidental changes while powered on. Material: Die-cast aluminum chassis Contols: Rotary volume/squelch knobs; backlit keys Scanning Modes: Programmable, dual and triple watch Weather Alert: S.A.M.E. Weather Alert Transmit Power: 5/2.5/1 watt Receiver Performance: Sensitivity: 0.23µV; Rejection: 71dB Battery Life Li-ion: 12 hours Waterproof: Mfr.-rated JIS 8 Dimensions: 2.4"W x 4.25"H x 1.4"D Display Type: Dot-matrix LCD Screen Size: 1.5"W x 1.25"H Weight: 12.3oz. Included Equipment: Dual-voltage 110/220V AC charger, 12V DC charger, alkaline battery tray, rapid charging cradle, swivel belt clip, antenna, lanyard
Views: 31733 West Marine
Unboxing icom ic m25 vhf radio in Egypt by su1am
 
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Su1am icom VHF marine radio Egypt اللاسلكى
Views: 258 Ahmed Elbaz

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