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Automatic telephone exchange - operating
 
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A step-by-step automatic telephone exchange brought into operation in 1921 at a post office in Ljubljana, which was the first automatic exchange in the then Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later Yugoslavia). Originally it connected 500 users, but the facilities were later upgraded. Before being donated to the Museum of Post & Telecommunications in 1981, it had a total of 2000 subscribers. Two automatic telephones are connected to the exchange; the first is a Siemens & Halske and the other Telefongyar R. T. Budapest.
Views: 27174 Sounds of Changes
AT&T Archives: The Step-By-Step Switch
 
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See more from the AT&T Archives at http://techchannel.att.com/archives The purpose of this film was to show employees, back in 1951, how calls were automatically switched through an SxS office. This film gives a general appreciation of the importance, complexity, and cost of switching equipment in an average 1950s telephone office. The path of a call is illustrated as it runs through a demonstration unit. "Careful adherance to Bell System maintenance practices" is stressed. While this is only part I, Part II eventually showed the equipment in various types of use, and Part II showed the internal circuit operations. Switchers today are digital and look drastically different. These systems at this time were still not even transistorized, so this film shows a system that's not only years back in time, but many generations back in terms of technology. Producer: Audio Productions, Inc. Footage courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, Warren, NJ
Views: 212458 AT&T Tech Channel
The Final Step by Step telephone switch in Southwestern Bell
 
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Southwestern Bell Telephone's last analog to digital switch transition cable cut. 1996
Views: 3550 Daryl Maxwell
Dialing Through The Step-by-Step Telephone Switching System
 
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NOTE: ALL MY REPLIES TO COMMENTS PRIOR TO AUG 24, 2017 HAVE BEEN LOST DUE TO A PROBLEM WITH MY GOOGLE ACCOUNT. I WILL CONTINUE TO ANSWER NEW QUESTIONS GOING FORWARD. Watch a rotary dial telephone call progress through the SXS switching system to telephone number Beechwood 4-5789. You can see a complete SXS Central Office in operation at this link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VO7MWFI9SU
Views: 5868 Hicken65
CP's Local Telephone Exchange Personal Tour. Unedi
 
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This is Raw footage of my Trip to the Local Telephone Exchange Location in Miami, Florida. Switches, dslams, Local Exchanges, ISDN, LD, InterLATA, ect. ATT Local Switch in the 305 / 786 Area Code
Views: 16709 Carlos Pineiro
Step-by-Step Telephone Switch Line Finder HD
 
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Some various short video clips from a Western Electric Strowger telephone switch from a telephone office. I'm working on a video of my switch, and thought I'd upload a few sample clips.
Views: 79102 westernelectric
Telephone Exchange Step Switch Desk Lamp
 
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Should be Strowger Switch instead of Stowger. Telephone exchange step switch modified as a retirement gift. I thought this was interesting and made a video of it. I remember visiting a telephone exchange when I was a kid. A building full of these switches was quite noisy. 70+ year old technology. Shooting video through the Plexiglass case was difficult.
Views: 4497 Ronald Walters
Exclusive: Inside Verizon's 3G and 4G Network | Pocketnow
 
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On the heels of the one-year anniversary of its 4G LTE service rollout, Verizon Wireless has granted Pocketnow exclusive access to one of their switches in southeastern Pennsylvania. The switch (or Mobile Telephone Switching Office -- MTSO) is a hub of Verizon's network in the Philadelphia tri-state area: it's what connects the towers in the region and processes all voice and data calls. The switch, which is a building filled with miles of fiber optic cable, a battery backup system and a generator system, dozens of servers, and a control room that monitors precise data as it pertains to the performance and stability of the system, is a marvel of engineering and technology. We also get to witness Verizon's obsession with reliability of their network. Each and every component is redundant within the switch so that if there are any equipment failures or even a natural disaster that disrupts power to the entire facility, Verizon customers are likely to still have service. We also learn a lot about the difference between Verizon's 3G and 4G network, the latter of which now reaches 200 million people in 190 markets across the U.S., including much of the Philadelphia region. During multiple Q&A session, we learn about the capabilities of Verizon's 4G LTE network, which is only going to increase with further network upgrades. Thank you to the folks at Verizon Wireless for letting us take a tour of the infrastructure that is responsible for making their network operate. If you want to learn even more about Verizon's network, check out our exclusive tour of their hardware testing lab: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7JHXl_rXXRY Subscribe: http://bit.ly/pocketnowsub https://pocketnow.com Follow us: http://flipboard.com/@Pocketnow http://facebook.com/pocketnow http://twitter.com/pocketnow http://google.com/+pocketnow http://instagram.com/pocketnow About us: Pocketnow has been a key source of mobile technology news and reviews since its establishment in 2000. With offices on three continents, Pocketnow offers round-the-clock coverage of the mobile technology landscape, from smartphones to tablets to wearables. We aim to be your number-one source for mobile tech news, reviews, comparisons, and commentary. If you love mobile as much as we do, be sure to subscribe! Exclusive: Inside Verizon's 3G and 4G Network | Pocketnow https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZSsfTnQPIE PocketNow https://www.youtube.com/pocketnow
Views: 61243 Pocketnow
Speedy Cutover Service, SXS switching cutover to ESS filmed live at Glendale CA central office, 1984
 
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A brief but surprisingly exciting 1984 video showing the preparation and live, real-time cutover from Step By Step switching system (SXS) to a new electronic switching system (ESS) in Glendale, California. Western Electric offered the Speedy Cutover Service to switching offices throughout the Bell System. Western Electric installers would visit a facility and prepare it, installing the new equipment inside the facility. They would identify and mark the existing cables that would need to be cut, then prepare employees for the cutover to the new ESS system. Previously a cutover from step-by-step (or from crossbar service) to ESS would take many frantic minutes, upwards of an hour, during which time active telephone service would be lost mid-call. With the speedy cutover service – 51 installers simultaneously cutting 927 cables as fast as possible, all on cue – the interrupted service could be brought down to well under a single minute. The climax here is unquestionably the moment of truth, the cutting of the cables, which is shown in real time. After making sure no emergency calls are underway, and with a shout of "Let's cut it!" the race is on, with three camera set-ups and a disco score capturing and preserving the moment of truth. Footage Courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, Warren, NJ
Views: 35608 AT&T Tech Channel
Strowger Step-by-step Demonstration
 
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A short training film, believed to be from Telstra showing the operation of Strowger telephone switching using a model exchange. It illustrates a uniselector, group selectors and a final selector. Note the mix of 2000 type and 4000 type groups selectors. Video courtesy of Richard Youl. A correspondent adds: "This is from the first year apprentice course at the Telecom Training School at Tooronga in Melbourne from the mid 1970's. I remember it well."
Views: 31852 Sam Hallas
Telephone Exchange PBX (two way)
 
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(EN) The PBX system allows you to make phone calls between two telephones. Initiate a phone call occurs when a telephone receiver is high; the call is completed when both phones are closed. (RO) Aceasta centrala telefonica permite efectuarea de convorbiri telefonice intre doua posturi telefonice. Iniţierea unui apel telefonic are loc atunci când un telefon are receptorul ridicat; convorbirea se încheie atunci când ambele telefoane sunt închise.
Views: 27502 Iulian Magirescu
Introduction to Telephone Systems
 
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Follow Eli on the Vlog Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/EliComputerGuyLive Info Level: Beginner Presenter: Eli the Computer Guy Date Created: August 2, 2010 Length of Class: 54 Minutes Tracks Telephone Systems Prerequisites None Purpose of Class This class introduces students to the basic components of telephone systems. Topics Covered Public Switched Telephone Network Central Offices Trunk Lines PBX and Voicemail Systems PBX Stations Voicemail Subcribers Class Notes Introduction Telephone systems are not complicated if you understand how they work. A Word on VoIP VoIP is not a telephone system PSTN PSTN -- Public Switched Telephone Network is like the Internet, but for telephone communication NADP -- North American Dialing Plan -- Is the system for routing telephone calls. Central Office -- All telephone lines connect to a local central office Trunk Lines Every Trunk Line has a telephone number A Trunk Line allows for 1 incoming or outgoing call. You can have far more telephones in a building then you have trunk lines. Incoming Trunk lines are setup in Hunt Groups. If the main phone number is busy the call is automatically forwarded to the next number in the Hunt Group Incoming Hunt Groups are setup by your local telephone company. Outgoing calls can be routed to use selected trunk lines. This in configured in your PBX. PBX and Voicemail The PBX routes telephone calls The Voicemail system provides all audio messaging. (Voicemail boxes, Message Boards, and Auto Attendant Messages) Stations All devices that connect to the PBX are "Stations". This includes telephones, call boxes, intercom systems, etc. There are 2 types of stations; Analogue and Digital. Analogue and Digital stations have to be connected to appropriate ports on the PBX. An analogue phone cannot connect to a digital port and vice versa. Almost all fax machines and phones you buy at retail stores are analogue. If your new fax machine does not work it may be because it's plugged into a digital line. Subscribers Subscribers are users of the Voicemail system. Subscribers do not have to have stations Voicemail ports are the number of connections to the Voicemail system at any one time. This includes not just people retrieving their voicemail, but also incoming calls that connect to Auto Attendant messages. Final Thoughts Be careful before you touch! Most older telephone and voicemail systems were administered using a phone keypad, NOT and computer interface. If you mess something up it can be very difficult to rebuild a deleted Auto Attendant or such. Resources North American Numbering Plan PSTN -- Wikipedia
Views: 646058 Eli the Computer Guy
Inside a Siemens (GPT) ISDX Telephone Switch
 
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These are all over the place but it's not often you'll see one, let alone four! Time to take a look inside three ISDX 300s, plus their bigger brother, the ISDX 3000. Info on the ISDX 300, a.k.a. ISDX-S: http://hipath.custhelp.com/DX_files/HiPath_DX_EP_V9new/EP%20v9.0/description/isdx_s/main_equipment.htm Info on the ISDX 3000, a.k.a. ISDX-L or ISDX-T: http://hipath.custhelp.com/DX_files/HiPath_DX_EP_V9new/EP%20v9.0/description/isdx_lt/main_equipment.htm INDEX 0:09 Introduction 1:03 Under the hood of a running ISDX 300 2:56 Decommissioned ISDX 300s - TWO of them 4:01 Inside the old one (rev. 5.x) 4:16 RISC loader 5:09 RISC CPU 5:49 4 Channel Serial I/O 6:16 Delta Channel Controller 6:33 Digital Switch Controller 6:58 300 Baud Modem 7:28 Shelf Interface 7:45 16 Channel GP I/O 8:19 Rotary Register 8:53 Universal Trunk Controller 9:39 4 Channel Interface 1 (SPM) 10:32 2M Word Memory and Control 11:03 CPU 1 11:30 CPU 2 12:37 16 Channel Codec 12:59 16 Channel Extension 13:47 Communications Equipment 14:20 8 Channel Bypass 15:20 Ops Console Interface 16:39 Inside the new one (rev. 9) 17:00 System Card 17:51 Backplanes 19:16 30 Channel Digital Line Card 19:37 GPIO and Modem 20:22 Backplanes again 21:56 Bigger brother: the ISDX 3000
Views: 12607 AintBigAintClever
Telephone exchange Server Room
 
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My daily visit to telephone exchange room.
Views: 18982 Khurram Shahzad
No  5 Crossbar Tour
 
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Museum volunteer Ed Mattson gives a tour of the 5XB from Mercer Island's ADams exchange. This video is captioned, because the 5XB can get loud sometimes ;) Part 2 here: https://youtu.be/f_0K8EMN6iI
Views: 17737 Connections Museum
GPO Telephone Exchange Rotary Cam Switch
 
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An unusual telephone exchange (?) rotary cam switch from the 1960s or 1970s.
Views: 2286 CarlsTechShed
Crossbar switching system - Telephone
 
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From the Museum of Communications, this is a quick video of me standing in one of the aisles of the crossbar frames. I don't know which model this was, but I'll update the video when I figure it out. The system is constantly dialing via an auto-dialer one aisle over.
Views: 18935 VeeDubTDI
PBX Private Branch Exchange Telephone Systems: "Invisible Diplomats" 1965 AT&T; Audrey Meadows
 
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more at http://phones.quickfound.net AT&T high-end business marketing film for PBX (Private Branch eXchange) switchboards. The film stars Audrey Meadows & Ruta Lee, the cinematographer was Hal Mohr (A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Phantom of the Opera, Rancho Notorious...). Two different kinds are shown: Audrey Meadows' PBX is a more traditional cord switchboard. The operator answers and connects calls by plugging cords into jacks. Ruta Lee's PBX is the latest (in 1965) cordless switchboard. Calls are processed by pressing a sequence of buttons, instead of using cords and jacks. Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_telephone_system#Private_branch_exchange A private branch exchange (PBX) is a telephone exchange or switching system that serves a private organization and performs concentration of central office lines or trunks and provides intercommunication between a large number of telephone stations in the organization. The central office lines provide connections to the public switched telephone network and the concentration aspect of a PBX permits the shared use of these lines between all stations in the organization. The intercommunication aspect allows two or more stations to establish telephone or conferencing calls between them without using the central office equipment. Each PBX-connected station, such as a telephone set, a fax machine, or a computer modem, is often referred to as an extension and has a designated extension telephone number that may or may not be mapped automatically to the numbering plan of the central office and the telephone number block allocated to the PBX. Initially, the primary advantage of a PBX was the cost savings for internal phone calls: handling the circuit switching locally reduced charges for telephone service via the central office lines. As PBX systems gained popularity, they were equipped with services that were not available in the public network, such as hunt groups, call forwarding, and extension dialing. In the 1960s a simulated PBX known as Centrex provided similar features from the central telephone exchange. A PBX is differentiated from a key telephone system (KTS) in that users of a key system manually select their own outgoing lines on special telephone sets that control buttons for this purpose, while PBXs select the outgoing line automatically or, formerly, by an operator. The telephone sets connected to a PBX do not normally have special keys for central office line control, but it is not uncommon for key systems to be connected to a PBX to extend its services. A PBX, in contrast to a key system, employs an organizational numbering plan for its stations. In addition, a dial plan determines whether additional digit sequences must be prefixed when dialing to obtain access to a central office trunk. Modern number analysis systems permit users to dial internal and external telephone numbers without special codes to distinguish the intended destination. History The term PBX was first applied when switchboard operators managed company switchboards manually using cord circuits. As automated electromechanical switches and later electronic switching systems gradually replaced the manual systems, the terms private automatic branch exchange (PABX) and private manual branch exchange (PMBX) were used to differentiate them. Solid state digital systems were sometimes referred to as electronic private automatic branch exchanges (EPABX). Today, the term PBX is by far the most widely recognized. The acronym is now applied to all types of complex, in-house telephony switching systems. Two significant developments during the 1990s led to new types of PBX systems. One was the massive growth of data networks and increased public understanding of packet switching. Companies needed packet switched networks for data, so using them for telephone calls was tempting, and the availability of the Internet as a global delivery system made packet switched communications even more attractive. These factors led to the development of the voice over IP PBX, or IP-PBX. The other trend was the idea of focusing on core competence. PBX services had always been hard to arrange for smaller companies, and many companies realized that handling their own telephony was not their core competence. These considerations gave rise to the concept of the hosted PBX...
Views: 26291 Jeff Quitney
The Line Finder In The Step-By-Step Telephone Switching System
 
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This video describes in detail the operation of the electromechanical line finder switch in the Step-By-Step telephone switching system. You can see a complete SXS Central Office in operation at this link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VO7MWFI9SU
Views: 587 Hicken65
Strowger CAA-61-stara Centrala telefoniczna old exchange
 
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Strowger PWRN Kielce-Polska
Views: 47194 MrKozjusz
ILLEGAL TELEPHONE EXCHANGE - RAID BY TERM CELL DOT & PUNJAB POLICE YEAR 2005
 
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The video is about the illegal telephone exchange which was operational in Amritsar , India. The culprits were terminating the traffic through Foreign VSAT and Foreign Internet Service providers in India and further switching it through local Indian PSTN network. This setup has caused the loss of Rs. 3 Crore to the Telecom Department in India. The video is just to show how these setups are operational.
Views: 22876 harish kumar
The Traveling Telephone Switching Machine - AT&T Archives
 
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See more from the AT&T Archives at http://techchannel.att.com/archives The #5A Crossbar switcher, built by Western Electric at the Columbus Works, was a telephone switching machine that could handle either around 1000 lines, or up to 2000 with an extension upgrade. This made it ideal for smaller towns and communities, new large subdivisions, and larger companies. The crossbar switch itself took up 10 by 42 feet, and weighed 25 tons. The machine was pre-assembled in Ohio, and then trucked to its final installation site. This film shows the assembly and transportation, and further details about the crossbar switch's "plug and play" type of capabilities. The Columbus Works were one of the Bell System's later plants, built specifically for switching equipment manufacture, and opened in the late 1950s. It eventually manufactured not just the crossbar switch but also the 4ESS digital switch. The last major manufacturing effort AT&T ran at the plant was its Airloop, which was a wireless system announced in 1995 that was a potential replacement for crossbar-type switching systems in hard-to-reach areas. It could bring quantities of new lines to the network wirelessly, without having to build in new trunk lines to a site. At its peak, the Columbus Works employed around 12,000 workers, including 1,000 Bell Labs employees alone. In 1996 it became part of Lucent Technologies, which sold the plant in 2003. Today, the office building on the site is still occupied, but much of the manufacturing plant is empty. Writer/director: Dick Martin Music: Steve Covello Footage Courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, Warren, NJ
Views: 27985 AT&T Tech Channel
WE Co. Panel Switching System Details & Closeups
 
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One of the things I really love about the panel office is the things you notice when you stop and look closely at the equipment. So, here's a video of just closeups.
Views: 2528 Connections Museum
UAX13 Telephone Exchange
 
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A live public UAX13 Telephone Exchange filmed in September 1989. This was a British Post Office rural telephone exchange in common use throughout the UK.
Views: 27850 conceptcity
Strowger Telephone Switch in Action
 
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strowger_switch
Views: 2020 Watts Ueltschey
ESS: Electronic Switching System 1965 Western Electric Telephone Technology
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net 'Title refers to: Electronic Switching System. Great footage of 1960s technological breakthroughs with silicon semiconductors; early microscopic manufacturing; great early Silicon Valley solid-state manufacturing technology breakthroughs, and early nanotechnology. Great footage high tech electronics assembly; silicon crystals, transistors, circuitry, early computer-industry related technology. ...CU blinking orange-red light, camera pans down machine control panel, disembodied finger presses red switch. Great ...VS BW stock footage of women and men in 1930s working in factory manufacturing telephone parts. ...Pan down row of 1960s women looking into microscopes assembling telephone parts; CU pin of precision device used to produce tiny part; woman sticks arms into gloves extending into controlled vacuum chamber glass chamber, camera pans out to show various women working on similar tasks down row; women with drill in pieces on large board of electronics, camera pans over women with drills working on electronics switching system. ...Pan down wall of ESS electronic telephone service electronics and electronic magnetized memory banks; animated diagram shows how ESS works superimposed over wall of magnetized memory card bank. ...Zoom in on stored program control unit; memory unit Twistor module moves down conveyor line, male and female workers use microscopes and magnifying glasses to look at memory unit; CU machine producing special Twistor wire; VS long thing metal Twistor wires move along machine passing through mylar polyethylene belts... ...Great shot machine dropping tiny metal reeds into racks progressed forward on conveyor line... ...CU worker examines ferried switches under microscope. ...Spinning molten furnace producing silicon crystals; camera zooms on man removing silicon crystal from machine... ...Camera pans out from electronic box with blink yellow light room of women at work looking through hi-tech microscopes and assembly solid state components... ...Woman testing semiconductors using electronic monitor; VS women assembling circuit boards; machine rapidly shakes board of ESS coils... ...Large spool of punched tape for computer system. ...CU disembodied hand holding drill drills in wire and patches it to other part of switch board; pan down rows and rows of men working on huge banks of wiring of ESS switchboard. Great shots of early metal film production using photo emulsion process; Nikon shadowgraph is used to check resistor pattern; CU resistor pattern on shadowgraph... ...CU molten furnace producing silicon crystal. ' Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_switching_system In telecommunications, an electronic switching system (ESS) is a telephone switch that uses digital electronics and computerized control to interconnect telephone circuits for the purpose of establishing telephone calls. The generations of telephone switches before the advent of electronic switching in the 1950s used purely electro-mechanical relay systems and analog voice paths. These early machines typically utilized the step-by-step technique. The first generation of electronic switching systems in the 1960s were not entirely digital in nature, but used reed relay-operated metallic paths or crossbar switches operated by stored program control (SPC) systems. First announced in 1955, the first customer trial installation of an all-electronic central office commenced in Morris, Illinois in November 1960 by Bell Laboratories. The first prominent large-scale electronic switching system was the Number One Electronic Switching System (1ESS) of the Bell System in the United States, introduced in Succasunna, New Jersey, in May 1965. Later electronic switching systems implemented the digital representation of the electrical audio signals on subscriber loops by digitizing the analog signals and processing the resulting data for transmission between central offices. Time-division multiplexing (TDM) technology permitted the simultaneous transmission of multiple telephone calls on a single wire connection between central offices or other electronic switches, resulting in dramatic capacity improvements of the telephone network... In the late 20th century most telephone exchanges without TDM processing were eliminated and the term electronic switching system became largely a historical distinction for the older SPC systems...
Views: 65809 Jeff Quitney
Electromechanical automatic telephone exchange
 
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Dialing the last few digits before a connection is made. Recorded in Museum of Post and Telecommunications in Polhov Gradec, Slovenia.
Views: 36764 avian6
Strowger step-by-step switch demonstration
 
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This is a 2-digit strowger switch. It counts pulses from a rotary dial telephone (or system) and can accumulate two dialed digits. These were usually combined to allow for longer digit strings. A 7-digit string would require at least 4 of such switches (and a lot of other gear to send the ring signal, the dial tone, the busy tone, etc.) Anyone having knowledge of these (or this stuff in general) please do add your thoughts, especially if I got something wrong.
Views: 17850 glasstronic
AT&T Archives: Switchboards, Old and New (Bonus Edition)
 
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See more from the AT&T Archives at http://techchannel.att.com/archives Introduction by George Kupczak of the AT&T Archives and History Center Switchboards, Old and New traces the development of voice switching methods from the first system that utilized the wires of a burglar alarm unit in Boston in 1877, to the "latest type" of switching in central offices, circa 1932. Along the way, we get the evolution of the Operator as well. Originally teenage boys were hired as operators, but it was quickly noted that they were not ideal due to being rambunctious and prone to pranks. Emma and her sister Stella Nutt were the first female operators, hired in 1878. They started a tradition that continued to the 1970s, when equal hiring practices made it possible for men to become operators as well, again. Switchboards started to be replaced by TSPS (Traffic Service Position System), starting in 1969. Voicemail trees, also called Interactive Voice Response, also replaced operators. In 2000, there were fewer than 300,000 operators working in the U.S., most at the switchboards of large companies or hotels. That number continues to drop by the thousands every year. Produced by Loucks and Norling Studios Footage courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, Warren, NJ
Views: 76389 AT&T Tech Channel
Ericsson: Switches in time
 
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A movie about telephone switches and the Ericsson AXE system. From 1985. The movie is collected from the movie archive of Ericsson at Centre for Business History, Stockholm, Sweden. Please visit http://ericssonhistory.com and http://www.naringslivshistoria.se for more information. MotivID: LM002095
Views: 4078 ericssonhistory
Manual telephone exchange
 
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Manual desktop telephone exchange with wooden casing, a dial and a Bakelite handset. Manual exchanges were in use from the second half of the 19th century. In Slovenia, the last manual telephone exchange with eight connections ceased operating in September 1987. Two magneto telephones are connected to the exchange. The exchange is part of the collection of Museum of Post & Telecommunications.
Views: 4022 Sounds of Changes
What is TELEPHONE SWITCHBOARD? What does TELEPHONE SWITCHBOARD mean?
 
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What is TELEPHONE SWITCHBOARD? What does TELEPHONE SWITCHBOARD mean? TELEPHONE SWITCHBOARD meaning - TELEPHONE SWITCHBOARD definition - TELEPHONE SWITCHBOARD explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A telephone switchboard is a telecommunications system used in the public switched telephone network or in enterprises to interconnect circuits of telephones to establish telephone calls between the subscribers or users, or between other exchanges. The switchboard was an essential component of a manual telephone exchange, and was operated by switchboard operators who used electrical cords or switches to establish the connections. The electromechanical automatic telephone exchange, invented by Almon Strowger in 1888, gradually replaced manual switchboards in central telephone exchanges around the world. In 1919, the Bell System in Canada also adopted automatic switching as its future technology, after years of reliance on manual systems. Nevertheless, many manual branch exchanges remained operational into the second half of the 20th century in many enterprises. Later electronic devices and computer technology gave the operator access to an abundance of features. A private branch exchange (PBX) in a business usually has an attendant console for the operator, or an auto-attendant, which bypasses the operator entirely. The switchboard is usually designed to accommodate the operator, who sits facing it. It has a high back panel, which consists of rows of female jacks, each jack designated and wired as a local extension of the switchboard (which serves an individual subscriber) or as an incoming or outgoing trunk line. The jack is also associated with a lamp. On the table or desk area in front of the operator are columns of keys, lamps and cords. Each column consists of a front key and a rear key, a front lamp and a rear lamp, followed by a front cord and a rear cord, making up together a cord circuit. The front key is the "talk" key allowing the operator to speak with that particular cord pair. The rear key on older "manual" boards and PBXs is used to ring a telephone physically. On newer boards, the back key is used to collect (retrieve) money from coin telephones. Each of the keys has three positions: back, normal and forward. When a key is in the normal position an electrical talk path connects the front and rear cords. A key in the forward position (front key) connects the operator to the cord pair, and a key in the back position sends a ring signal out on the cord (on older manual exchanges). Each cord has a three-wire TRS phone connector: tip and ring for testing, ringing and voice; and a sleeve wire for busy signals. When a call is received, a jack lamp lights on the back panel and the operator responds by placing the rear cord into the corresponding jack and throwing the front key forward. The operator then converses with the caller, who informs the operator to whom he or she would like to speak. If it is another extension, the operator places the front cord in the associated jack and pulls the front key backwards to ring the called party. After connecting, the operator leaves both cords "up" with the keys in the normal position so the parties can converse. The supervision lamps light to alert the operator when the parties finish their conversation and go on-hook. Either party could "flash" the operator's supervision lamps by depressing their switch hook for a second and releasing it, in case they needed assistance with a problem. When the operator pulls down a cord, a pulley weight behind the switchboard pulls it down to prevent it from tangling. On a trunk, on-hook and off-hook signals must pass in both directions. In a one-way trunk, the originating or A board sends a short for off-hook, and an open for on-hook, while the terminating or B board sends normal polarity or reverse polarity. This "reverse battery" signaling was carried over to later automatic exchanges.
Views: 82 The Audiopedia
AT&T Archives: Introduction to the Dial Telephone
 
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See more from the AT&T Archives at http://techchannel.att.com/archives This short subject newsreel was shown in movie theaters the week before a town's or region's telephone exchange was to be converted to dial service. It's extremely short—a little over a minute, like a PSA. The film concisely explains how to use a dial telephone, including how to dial, how to recognize dial tone, and how to recognize a busy signal. The first dial telephonewas manufactured in 1897. It was part of an automatic switching/dialing system invented by Almon Strowger and patented in 1889. (You can see this switching system in action on the film "The Step By Step Switch"). But the Bell System didn't start to roll out Strowger's invention until 1919, though they did showcase the technology in 1904. In 1922, New York City was introduced to dial. The first popularized dial telephone was a desk set candlestick model; the smaller, more familiar desk set came later. It took decades for dial to sweep the entire Bell System. The last holdout was Catalina Island, off the coast of California, which finally converted to dial in 1978. In Camp Shohola, Pennsylvania, an internal automatic switch system still connects campers with the outside world, it's the oldest functioning Strowger switch in the world. Other Bell System films on the introduction of dial: * Dial Comes to Town * How To Use the Dial Telephone * Now You Can Dial Footage Courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, Warren, NJ
Views: 126556 AT&T Tech Channel
Telephone Switchboard
 
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Wiki: A telephone switchboard is a telecommunications system used in the public switched telephone network or in enterprises to interconnect circuits of telephones to establish telephone calls between the subscribers or users, or between other exchanges. The switchboard was an essential component of a manual telephone exchange, and was operated by one or more persons, called operators who either used electrical cords or switches to establish the connections. The electromechanical automatic telephone exchange, invented by Almon Strowger in 1888, gradually replaced manual switchboards in central telephone exchanges starting in 1919 when the Bell System adopted automatic switching, but many manual branch exchanges remained operational during the last half of the 20th century in offices, hotels, or other enterprises. Later electronic devices and computer technology gave the operator access to an abundance of features. In modern businesses, a private branch exchange (PBX) often has an attendant console for the operator, or an auto-attendant, which bypasses the operator entirely.
Views: 867 El B
V1: Fundamentals of Telecom 1 - Introduction and Preview
 
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Teracom DVD Video Course V1 Fundamentals of Telecom 1 The PSTN • Telephony • The Telecom Industry • Telecom Equipment Length 142 minutes. 55-page student manual. ISBN 1-894887-26-3 Teracom Training Institute http://www.teracomtraining.com/video_courses.htm It all starts with the PSTN and POTS. We'll begin with the basics of telephony: loops, trunks, circuits, analog, the voiceband... fundamentals that are key to understanding newer technologies and services. Then, we'll review switches, PBXs, Centrex and ancillary equipment like ACDs and IVRs. With this framework in place, we'll explore the telecommunications industry, understanding the main players and competitors, how LECs connect to IXCs, the switching hierarchy and how CLECs fit into the picture. The topics in this course - how the telephone system and industry work, provide the essential foundation on which everything else, including digital communications, data circuits and networking are built. Course outline - V1: Fundamentals of Telecom 1 Length 142 minutes. DVD-R NTSC format. 55-page 8.5" x 11" softcover bound workbook. Part 1 Fundamentals of Telephony 1.03 The Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) 1.05 Analog Circuits 1.07 What is Sound? 1.09 The Voiceband 1.11 Plain Ordinary Telephone Service (POTS) 1.13 DTMF Address Signaling 1.15 Signaling System 7 (SS7) Part 2 Telecom Equipment 2.03 Telephone Switches 2.05 PBX vs. Centrex 2.07 Voice VPNs 2.09 Call Centers Part 3 The Telecommunications Industry 3.03 US Domestic Telcos 3.05 AT&T and Verizon 3.07 Canadian Telephone Companies 3.09 PSTN Switching Centers Before Competition 3.11 Accessing The Interexchange Carriers 3.13 Competitive Local Exchange Carriers (CLECs) Appendix A Acronyms and Abbreviations Teracom's self-paced DVD-video courses: ideal for learning about telecom, datacom, networking, IP, MPLS, Voice over IP and wireless outside of structured seminars. Each course comes with an approx. 2-hour full-color multimedia DVD-video, a comprehensive workbook/textbook with copies of all graphics and detailed reference notes that are sure to be a valuable reference for years to come; plus a knowledge evaluation exercise and personalized course completion certificate suitable for framing. Related video: Videotutorial V1 "Loops" is a free sample, from Lesson 1.03 of this DVD.
Telephone switchboard
 
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A telephone switchboard is a telecommunications system used in the public switched telephone network or in enterprises to interconnect circuits of telephones to establish telephone calls between the subscribers or users, or between other exchanges. The switchboard was an essential component of a manual telephone exchange, and was operated by one or more persons, called operators who either used electrical cords or switches to establish the connections. The electromechanical automatic telephone exchange, invented by Almon Strowger in 1888, gradually replaced manual switchboards in central telephone exchanges starting in 1919 when the Bell System adopted automatic switching, but many manual branch exchanges remained operational during the last half of the 20th century in offices, hotels, or other enterprises. Later electronic devices and computer technology gave the operator access to an abundance of features. In modern businesses, a private branch exchange often has an attendant console for the operator, or an auto-attendant, which bypasses the operator entirely. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 932 Audiopedia
New Zealand Telephone Exchange
 
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Video from inside New Zealand telephone exchanges. Very interesting, lot's of historical things.
Views: 20129 MegaFranco44
Crossbar Switch
 
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This is a video of a Bell System Number 5 Crossbar Switching System registering and connecting calls dialed from rotary phones. This machine was made in the 1960s and was at the time the peak of electromechanical telephone switching technology, able to route calls in and out of its office, allowing for direct long distance dialing, and able to select the first available idle trunk to the next central office based on the area code it was given. None of these are left on the public telephone network, having all been replaced with digital switches. This one is on display in a museum.
Views: 2876 Novar Lynx
Narration of UK telephone system sounds from 1971 by Andrew Emmerson Part 1
 
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This is not my content. The recording has been taken from http://www.wideweb.com/phonetrips/. This is one of my favourite recordings on there and is narrated by Andrew Emmerson. It was recorded in 1971 and provides recordings as well as narration of the telephone system sounds during that time. I'm hoping I'm allowed to place this audio clip on YouTube. It is stated at the beginning of the recording that there is no copyright related to the audio. I am happy to remove it if anyone wishes me to. The image in the video is provided by cookieevans5 and is located at http://www.flickr.com/photos/pookieevans/2515235047/
Views: 9976 James Woolley
Dennehys Cross Ericsson ARF Crossbar Telephone Exchange
 
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The closing down of Dennehys Cross Telephone exchange 3/2/1999. The exchange had been in service since the 1970's and was replaced by an AXE exchange also supplied by Ericsson.
Views: 34958 Pat Dunlea
See a old Telephone Switches during a phonecall
 
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Old Telephone Switch in action
Views: 734 Ches Misso
What is PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE? What does PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE mean?
 
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What is PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE? What does PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE mean? PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE meaning - PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE definition - PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A private branch exchange (PBX) is a telephone exchange or switching system that serves a private organization and performs concentration of central office lines or trunks and provides intercommunication between a large number of telephone stations in the organization. The central office lines provide connections to the public switched telephone network and the concentration aspect of a PBX permits the shared use of these lines between all stations in the organization. The intercommunication aspect allows two or more stations to directly connect while not using the public switched telephone network. Each PBX-connected station, such as a telephone set, a fax machine, or a computer modem, is often referred to as an extension and has a designated extension telephone number that may or may not be mapped automatically to the numbering plan of the central office and the telephone number block allocated to the PBX. Initially, PBX systems offered the primary advantage of cost savings for internal phone calls: handling the circuit switching locally reduced charges for telephone service via central-office lines. As PBX systems gained popularity, they began to feature services not available in the public network, such as hunt groups, call forwarding, and extension dialing. From the 1960s a simulated PBX known as Centrex provided similar features from the central telephone exchange. A PBX differs from a key telephone system (KTS) in that users of a key system manually select their own outgoing lines on special telephone sets that control buttons for this purpose, while PBXs select the outgoing line automatically, or formerly, by an operator. The telephone sets connected to a PBX do not normally have special keys for central-office line control, but it is not uncommon for key systems to be connected to a PBX to extend its services. A PBX, in contrast to a key system, employs an organizational numbering plan for its stations. In addition, a dial plan determines whether additional digit sequences must be prefixed when dialing to obtain access to a central-office trunk. Modern number-analysis systems permit users to dial internal and external telephone numbers without special codes to distinguish the intended destination. The term PBX originated when switchboard operators managed company switchboards manually using cord circuits. As automated electromechanical switches and later electronic switching systems gradually replaced the manual systems, the terms private automatic branch exchange (PABX) and private manual branch exchange (PMBX) differentiated them. Solid-state digital systems were sometimes referred to as electronic private automatic branch exchanges (EPABX). As of 2016, the term PBX is by far the most widely recognized. The abbreviation now applies to all types of complex, in-house telephony switching systems. Two significant developments during the 1990s led to new types of PBX systems. One was the massive growth of data networks and increased public understanding of packet switching. Companies needed packet-switched networks for data, so using them for telephone calls proved tempting, and the availability of the Internet as a global delivery system made packet-switched communications even more attractive. These factors led to the development of the voice over IP PBX, or IP-PBX. The other trend involved the idea of focusing on core competence. PBX services had always been hard to arrange for smaller companies, and many companies realized that handling their own telephony was not their core competence. These considerations gave rise to the concept of the hosted PBX. In wireline telephony, the original hosted PBX was the Centrex service provided by telcos since the 1960s; later competitive offerings evolved into the modern competitive local exchange carrier. In voice over IP, hosted solutions are easier to implement as the PBX may be located at and managed by any telephone service provider, connecting to the individual extensions via the Internet. The upstream provider no longer needs to run direct, local leased lines to the served premises....
Views: 2210 The Audiopedia
What Is The Telephone Exchange?
 
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A telephone exchange is a telecommunications system used in the public switched network or large enterprises field of telecommunications, (us switch) piece equipment that connects phone calls. Get phone numbers, address, latest reviews & ratings, photos, maps for best telephone exchange in kunrathur, kolkata. Modern telephone exchange in kunrathur, chennai. Learn more 31 mar 2015 if you see a telephone number and are not sure what location it serves, might want to look up the exchange. How to find a telephone exchange number (noun) definition and synonyms. It is what makes your phone calls 'work' in the sense of making connections and relaying speech information a central system switches other equipment that establishes between individual telephonesamerican heritage set connects telephone lines during meaning, pronunciation, example sentences, more from oxford dictionaries exchange used to connect. In a 10 digit number, define telephone exchange (noun) and get synonyms. Telephone exchange wikipedia. What is telephone exchange (noun)? Telephone (noun) meaning, pronunciation and more by 12 aug 2015 here's a look at the illegal case that former maran got 364 actual phone numbers with high end connections his 21 mar 2017 openreach has released 360 degree video of modern surprisingly tidy. Telephone exchange in kolkata justdial. Macmillan all you need to know about the illegal telephone exchange case a rare look inside wiktionary. Telephone exchange, saligramam, chennai telephone exchange virugambakkam, first 5 digits of number main. A key function is its use in the public switched telephone network (pstn) define exchange a central office which wires of telephones may be connected to permit conversation definition building where connections are made between lines Meaning, pronunciation definition, telecommunications facility subscribers' connect, that switches calls among subscribers or other meaning, what contains equipment for connecting phone. Get phone numbers, address, latest reviews & ratings, photos, maps for best telephone exchange, kolkata on justdial exchange in saligramam, chennai listed under with contact number, virugambakkam, first 5 digitsmain exchangealipore23462Definition telecom dictionary definition of by the english how does a system work? Definition and meaning define at. Any equipment that establishes connections between telephones; The rooms housing such a telephone exchange is device routes inbound signals to the subscriber whom caller wants speak. Telephone exchange meaning in the cambridge english dictionary. Telephone exchange in kunrathur, chennai justdial. Definition telephone exchange telecom dictionary phone definition of by the in english how does a system work? and meaning define at. What is a telephone exchange? (with picture) wisegeek.
Views: 38 Marisol Moran Tipz
Browns NEC NC100 Crossbar Telephone Exchange
 
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NC100 Crossbar Exchange in action at Ferrymead Park in Christchurch, New Zealand. Equipment seen here has recovered from Hedgehope in Southland. An exchange which, until 2002 was still in use by Telecom New Zealand.
Views: 18169 David Murch
Working in a telephone exchange,  1960's -- Film 3792
 
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Telephone exchange. Going for an interview as a telephone operator. Hand writing test. Training in class and use of the old style exchanges. Dummy exchange for training. London Telephone Exchange. Emergency numbers. Continental Exchange and you have to speak French.
Views: 22400 HuntleyFilmArchives
UKNOF28 - The hitchhikers guide to the telephone exchange (Our LLU experiences)
 
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Speaker: Charlie Boisseau (Fluency) https://indico.uknof.org.uk/conferenceOtherViews.py?view=standard&confId=30 The experiences we've had doing LLU/Exchange Unbundling with Openreach. A story from start to finish, including commercial, regulatory and logistical challenges and advantages.
Views: 6022 UKNOFconf

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