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What is property law?
 
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PLEASE VIEW THE UPDATED VERSION HERE: https://youtu.be/VU1Odf1hFTw What is property law? This video introduces people's rights concerning land and personal property. To discuss further, feel free to send me an email and to comment below. Also, please visit my new website and blog. I offer online tutoring and consulting for students and professionals. website: http://www.uslawessentials.com blog: http://www.uslawessentials.com/blog email:uslawessentials at gmail dot com
Views: 19214 USLawEssentials
What is PROPERTY LAW? What does PROPERTY LAW mean? PROPERTY LAW meaning & explanation
 
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What is PROPERTY LAW? What does PROPERTY LAW mean? PROPERTY LAW meaning - PROPERTY LAW definition - PROPERTY LAW explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Property law is the area of law that governs the various forms of ownership and tenancy in real property (land as distinct from personal or movable possessions) and in personal property, within the common law legal system. In the civil law system, there is a division between movable and immovable property. Movable property roughly corresponds to personal property, while immovable property corresponds to real estate or real property, and the associated rights and obligations thereon. The concept, idea or philosophy of property underlies all property law. In some jurisdictions, historically all property was owned by the monarch and it devolved through feudal land tenure or other feudal systems of loyalty and fealty. Though the Napoleonic code was among the first government acts of modern times to introduce the notion of absolute ownership into statute, protection of personal property rights was present in medieval Islamic law and jurisprudence, and in more feudalist forms in the common law courts of medieval and early modern England.
Views: 531 The Audiopedia
What is PERSONAL PROPERTY? What does PERSONAL PROPERTY mean? PERSONAL PROPERTY meaning
 
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What is PERSONAL PROPERTY? What does PERSONAL PROPERTY mean? PERSONAL PROPERTY meaning - PERSONAL PROPERTY definition - PERSONAL PROPERTY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Personal property is generally considered property that is movable, as opposed to real property or real estate. In common law systems, personal property may also be called chattels or personalty. In civil law systems, personal property is often called movable property or movables – any property that can be moved from one location to another. This term is in distinction with immovable property or immovables, such as land and buildings. Movable property on land, for example, larger livestock, was not automatically sold with the land. In contrast, wildlife and smaller livestock like chickens were often sold as part of the land. In fact the word cattle is the Old Norman variant of Old French chatel (derived from Latin capitalis, “of the head”), which was once synonymous with general movable personal property. Tangible personal property refers to any type of property that can generally be moved (i.e., it is not attached to real property or land), touched or felt. These generally include items such as furniture, clothing, jewelry, art, writings, or household goods. In some cases, there can be formal title documents that show the ownership and transfer rights of that property after a person's death (for example, motor vehicles, boats, etc.) In many cases, however, tangible personal property will not be "titled" in an owner's name and is presumed to be whatever property he or she was in possession of at the time of his or her death. Intangible personal property or "intangibles" refers to personal property that cannot actually be moved, touched or felt, but instead represents something of value such as negotiable instruments, securities, service (economics), and intangible assets including chose in action. Accountants also distinguish personal property from real property because personal property can be depreciated faster than improvements (while land is not depreciable at all). It is an owner's right to get tax benefits for chattel, and there are businesses that specialize in appraising personal property, or chattel. The distinction between these types of property is significant for a variety of reasons. Usually one's rights on movables are more attenuated than one's rights on immovables (or real property). The statutes of limitations or prescriptive periods are usually shorter when dealing with personal or movable property. Real property rights are usually enforceable for a much longer period of time and in most jurisdictions real estate and immovables are registered in government-sanctioned land registers. In some jurisdictions, rights (such as a lien or other security interest) can be registered against personal or movable property. In the common law it is possible to place a mortgage upon real property. Such mortgage requires payment or the owner of the mortgage can seek foreclosure. Personal property can often be secured with similar kind of device, variously called a chattel mortgage, trust receipt, or security interest. In the United States, Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code governs the creation and enforcement of security interests in most (but not all) types of personal property. There is no similar institution to the mortgage in the civil law, however a hypothec is a device to secure real rights against property. These real rights follow the property along with the ownership. In the common law a lien also remains on the property and it is not extinguished by alienation of the property; liens may be real or equitable.
Views: 866 The Audiopedia
Meaning of immovable property: TPA
 
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Follow me on Instagram: najeebkhan11 https://www.instagram.com/najeebkhan11/ CALLME4 id: [email protected] I have covered in this video the meaning of immovable property as given under section 3 of Transfer of Property Act 1882
Views: 5612 Theory of Abrogation
Property law Meaning
 
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Video is created with the help of wikipedia, if you are looking for accurate, professional translation services and efficient localization you can use Universal Translation Services https://www.universal-translation-services.com?ap_id=ViragGNG Video shows what property law means. the area of law concerned with the ownership and conveyance of property rights and title.. The formal course in property law required of most first-year law school students in common-law systems.. Property law Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say property law. Made with MaryTTS and Wiktionary
Views: 53 ADictionary
Property Meaning
 
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Video is created with the help of wikipedia, if you are looking for accurate, professional translation services and efficient localization you can use Universal Translation Services https://www.universal-translation-services.com?ap_id=ViragGNG Video shows what property means. Something that is owned.. A piece of real estate, such as a parcel of land.. Real estate; the business of selling houses.. property synonyms: Wikisaurus:property, Wikisaurus:characteristic, belongings, owndom, possession, land, parcel, attribute, feature, owndom, prop. property pronunciation. How to pronounce, definition by Wiktionary dictionary. property meaning. Powered by MaryTTS
Views: 1863 SDictionary
What is PRIVATE PROPERTY? What does PRIVATE PROPERTY mean? PRIVATE PROPERTY meaning & explanation
 
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What is PRIVATE PROPERTY? What does PRIVATE PROPERTY mean? PRIVATE PROPERTY meaning - PRIVATE PROPERTY definition - PRIVATE PROPERTY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Private property is a legal designation for the ownership of property by non-governmental legal entities. Private property is distinguishable from public property, which is owned by a state entity; and from collective (or cooperative) property, which is owned by a group of non-governmental entities. Private property is further distinguished from personal property, which refers to property for personal use and consumption. Private property is a legal concept defined and enforced by a country's political system. Although contemporary neoclassical economics, currently the dominant school of economics, rejects some of the assumptions of early philosophers that underpinned classical economics, it has been argued that neoclassical economics continues to be influenced by the legacy of natural moral theory and the concept of "natural rights", which has led to the presentation of private market exchange and private property rights as "natural rights" inherent in nature. Economic liberals (defined as those who support a private sector-driven market economy) consider private property to be essential for the construction of a prosperous society. They believe private ownership of land ensures the land will be put to productive use and its value protected by the landowner. If the owners must pay property taxes, this forces the owners to maintain a productive output from the land to keep taxes current. Private property also attaches a monetary value to land, which can be used to trade or as collateral. Private property thus is an important part of capitalization within the economy. Socialist economists are critical of private property as socialism aims to substitute private property in the means of production for social ownership or public property. Socialists generally argue that private property relations limit the potential of the productive forces in the economy when productive activity becomes a collective activity, where the role of the capitalist becomes redundant (as a passive owner). Socialists generally favor social ownership either to eliminate the class distinctions between owners and workers, and as a component of the development of a post-capitalist economic system. In response to the socialist critique, the Austrian School economist Ludwig Von Mises argued that private property rights are a requisite for what he called "rational" economic calculation and that the prices of goods and services cannot be determined accurately enough to make efficient economic calculation without having clearly defined private-property rights. Mises argued that a socialist system, which by definition would lack private property in the factors of production, would be unable to determine appropriate price valuations for the factors of production. According to Mises, this problem would make rational socialist calculation impossible. In Marxian economics and socialist politics, there is distinction between "private property" and "personal property". The former is defined as the means of production in reference to private ownership over an economic enterprise based on socialized production and wage labor; the latter is defined as consumer goods or goods produced by an individual. Prior to the 18th century, private property usually referred to land ownership. Private property in the means of production is criticized by socialists, who use the term in a different meaning. In socialism, "private property" refers to a social relationship in which the property owner takes possession of anything that another person or group produces with that property; capitalism depends on private property. The socialist critique of private ownership is heavily influenced by the Marxian analysis of capitalist property forms as part of its broader critique of alienation and exploitation in capitalism. Although there is considerable disagreement among socialists about the validity of certain aspects of Marxian analysis, the majority of socialists are sympathetic to Marx's views on exploitation and alienation. ....
Views: 1664 The Audiopedia
What is 1231 PROPERTY? What does 1231 PROPERTY mean? 1231 PROPERTY meaning & explanation
 
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What is 1231 PROPERTY? What does 1231 PROPERTY mean? 1231 PROPERTY meaning - 1231 PROPERTY definition - 1231 PROPERTY explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ?sub_confirmation=1 Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. 1231 Property is a category of property defined in section 1231 of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. 1231 property includes depreciable property and real property (e.g. buildings and equipment) used in a trade or business and held for more than one year. Some types of livestock, coal, timber and domestic iron ore are also included. It does not include: inventory; property held for sale in the ordinary course of business; artistic creations held by their creator; or, government publications. The 1954 version of the Internal Revenue Code included section 1231 covering certain property held by a business. The original section covering this matter - namely, section 117(j) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1939 - was enacted in 1942. The law was originally conceived as a way to help the shipping industry during World War II. The present version of the Internal Revenue Code has retained section 1231, with the provision now applying to both property lost in an involuntary conversion, and to the sale or exchange of certain kinds of business-use property. A taxpayer can calculate net 1231 gains and losses, often referred to as the hotchpot, as capital gains, with the caveat that if the gain is less than any “non-recaptured losses” from the preceding five years, it is re-characterized as ordinary income and is reported with Form 4797. “Non-recaptured loss” is covered by 1231(c). This provision refers to a situation when a taxpayer claims a 1231 loss in year one, but seeks a 1231 gain in any of subsequent years two through six. Any gain which is less than or equal to the loss in year one will be characterized as ordinary income rather than long-term capital gain (which has preferred tax rates). Gains and losses under 1231 due to casualty or theft are set aside in what is often referred to as the fire-pot (tax). These gains and losses do not enter the hotchpot unless the gains exceed the losses. If the result is a gain, both the gain and loss enter the hotchpot and are calculated with any other 1231 gains and losses. If there are more casualty loss(es) than gains, the excess is treated as an ordinary loss. Section 1231 treatment allows taxpayers to enjoy tax-favored treatment for 1231 property gains that are greater than 1231 property losses. This means that if the asset can be sold for a value greater than its basis, it can be taxed at a capital gains rate, which is lower than an ordinary income rate. However, if the 1231 property results in a loss then the taxpayer can treat it as an ordinary loss and such a loss may reduce the taxpayer's taxable income. This provision is said to give a taxpayer the "best of both worlds" as it allows the favorable capital gains tax rate on section 1231 property while avoiding the negative implications of capital loss treatment. Ordinary losses are 100% deductible, while capital losses are subject to an annual deduction limitation of $3,000 against ordinary income. Within this framework, if capital losses exceed capital gains by more than $3,000 in any given tax year, the portion of the deduction that may be used to offset ordinary income is limited to $3,000; the excess loss over $3,000 must be carried over to the following year....
Views: 73 The Audiopedia
Mislaid property Meaning
 
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Video is created with the help of wikipedia, if you are looking for accurate, professional translation services and efficient localization you can use Universal Translation Services https://www.universal-translation-services.com?ap_id=ViragGNG Video shows what mislaid property means. Property that is found in such a state as to make it likely that the original owner intentionally placed it somewhere, but then forgot to retrieve it from that place, and would be able to locate the property.. Mislaid property Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say mislaid property. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 80 ADictionary
What is PROPERTY? What does PROPERTY mean? PROPERTY meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is PROPERTY? What does PROPERTY mean? PROPERTY meaning - PROPERTY pronunciation - PROPERTY definition - PROPERTY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In the abstract, property is that which belongs to or with something, whether as an attribute or as a component of said thing. In the context of this article, property is one or more components (rather than attributes), whether physical or incorporeal, of a person's estate; or so belonging to, as in being owned by, a person or jointly a group of people or a legal entity like a corporation or even a society. (Given such meaning, the word property is uncountable, and as such, is not described with an indefinite article or as plural.) Depending on the nature of the property, an owner of property has the right to consume, alter, share, redefine, rent, mortgage, pawn, sell, exchange, transfer, give away or destroy it, or to exclude others from doing these things, as well as to perhaps abandon it; whereas regardless of the nature of the property, the owner thereof has the right to properly use it (as a durable, mean or factor, or whatever), or at the very least exclusively keep it. In economics and political economy, there are three broad forms of property: private property, public property, and collective property (also called cooperative property). Property that jointly belongs to more than one party may be possessed or controlled thereby in very similar or very distinct ways, whether simply or complexly, whether equally or unequally. However, there is an expectation that each party's will (rather discretion) with regard to the property be clearly defined and unconditional, so as to distinguish ownership and easement from rent. The parties might expect their wills to be unanimous, or alternately every given one of them, when no opportunity for or possibility of dispute with any other of them exists, may expect his, her, its or their own will to be sufficient and absolute. The Restatement (First) of Property defines property as anything, tangible or intangible whereby a legal relationship between persons and the state enforces a possessory interest or legal title in that thing. This mediating relationship between individual, property and state is called a property regime. In sociology and anthropology, property is often defined as a relationship between two or more individuals and an object, in which at least one of these individuals holds a bundle of rights over the object. The distinction between "collective property" and "private property" is regarded as a confusion since different individuals often hold differing rights over a single object. Important widely recognized types of property include real property (the combination of land and any improvements to or on the land), personal property (physical possessions belonging to a person), private property (property owned by legal persons, business entities or individual natural persons), public property (state owned or publicly owned and available possessions) and intellectual property (exclusive rights over artistic creations, inventions, etc.), although the last is not always as widely recognized or enforced. An article of property may have physical and incorporeal parts. A title, or a right of ownership, establishes the relation between the property and other persons, assuring the owner the right to dispose of the property as the owner sees fit.
Views: 3385 The Audiopedia
Meaning of Transfer of Property
 
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What is the Meaning of Transfer of Property within the meaning of section 5 of T P A 1882
Views: 40 Law a to z
What Is Equity In A Home
 
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What is home equity. Because I talk about equity so commonly in my videos, I get lots of questions about what it is. It's very important to understand and makes all the difference in real estate investing. The difference between a investment property with equity and one without equity, is the difference between a treasure chest full of money vs. one that is empty. Hopefully this video clarifies how important it is to invest in properties that have equity waiting for you. Watch and Enjoy! Kris Krohn & Nate Woodbury RESOURSES: ======================== Limitless 3 Day Event: http://bit.ly/2j5r8wM Get Mentoring: http://bit.ly/2lPGp9d Real Estate Investing Help: http://bit.ly/2lPGp9d Free Real Estate Audiobook: http://bit.ly/2oiORxy Free Conscious Creator Audiobook: http://bit.ly/2sZmaYU EQUIPMENT ======================== Camera: http://amzn.to/2oRnnAA Favorite Lens: http://amzn.to/1QEqTF4 External Mic: http://amzn.to/1Sx8Jq0 Camera Backpack: http://amzn.to/2oy5JAR MUSIC ======================== Tobu - Infectious https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ux8-EbW6DUI Artist: https://www.youtube.com/tobuofficial Licensed under Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 Support This Channel: ======================== ==SUBSCRIBE== http://bit.ly/1TOqKBN ==LIKE== Your "Likes" help more people find our videos. ==COMMENT== Comment and ask Questions ==PATREON== https://www.patreon.com/REInvestorTV ======================== Video by Nate Woodbury (The Hero Maker) BeTheHeroStudios.com
What is TANGIBLE PROPERTY? What does TANGIBLE PROPERTY mean? TANGIBLE PROPERTY meaning
 
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What is TANGIBLE PROPERTY? What does TANGIBLE PROPERTY mean? TANGIBLE PROPERTY meaning. Tangible property in law is, literally, anything which can be touched, and includes both real property and personal property (or moveable property), and stands in distinction to intangible property. In English law and some Commonwealth legal systems, items of tangible property are referred to as choses in possession (or a chose in possession in the singular). However, some property, despite being physical in nature, is classified in many legal systems as intangible property rather than tangible property because the rights associated with the physical item are of far greater significance than the physical properties. Principally, these are documentary intangibles. For example, a promissory note is a piece of paper that can be touched, but the real significance is not the physical paper, but the legal rights which the paper confers, and hence the promissory note is defined by the legal debt rather than the physical attributes. A unique category of property is money, which in some legal systems is treated as tangible property and in others as intangible property. Whilst most countries legal tender is expressed in the form of intangible property ("The Treasury of Country X hereby promises to pay to the bearer on demand...."), in practice bank notes are now rarely ever redeemed in any country, which has led to bank notes and coins being classified as tangible property in most modern legal systems.
Views: 596 The Audiopedia
What is Benami Property Meaning in Telugu | Property Lawyer in Hyderabad | 9948090355
 
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What is Benami property meaning in Telugu explained by best property lawyer in Hyderabad Sai Krishna Azad a famous high court lawyer with 15 years of experience as a legal practitioner. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Note: Do not call, Please ping us on Whatsapp:9948090355. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sai Krishna Azad High Court Advocate in Hyderabad Office: 1-8-702/19/A3, opp: Nandini Hotel, Near Shankarmutt, Nallakunta,, Hyderabad, Telangana 500044 Mail: [email protected], [email protected] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Websites http://lawforu.com/ http://www.advocatefornri.com/ http://legaldivorce.in/ http://www.legalnamechange.in/ http://www.lawforsociety.com/ Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/lawmedia
Views: 409 Law Media
What is COMMUNITY PROPERTY? What does COMMUNITY PROPERTY mean? COMMUNITY PROPERTY meaning
 
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What is COMMUNITY PROPERTY? What does COMMUNITY PROPERTY mean? COMMUNITY PROPERTY meaning - COMMUNITY PROPERTY definition - COMMUNITY PROPERTY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Community property is a marital property regime under which most property acquired during the marriage (except for gifts or inheritances), the community, or communio bonorum, is owned jointly by both spouses and is divided upon divorce, annulment, or death. Joint ownership is automatically presumed by law in the absence of specific evidence that would point to a contrary conclusion for a particular piece of property. Division of community property may take place by item by splitting all items or by values. In some jurisdictions, such as California, a 50/50 division of community property is strictly mandated by statute so the focus then shifts to whether particular items are to be classified as community or separate property. In other jurisdictions, such as Texas, a divorce court may decree an "equitable distribution" of community property, which may result in an unequal division of such. In non-community property states property may be divided by equitable distribution. Generally speaking, the property that each partner brings into the marriage or receives by gift, bequest or devise during marriage is called separate property (not community property). See division of property. Division of community debts may not be the same as division of community property. For example, in California, community property is required to be divided "equally" while community debt is required to be divided "equitably". Property owned by one spouse before the marriage is sometimes referred to as the "separate property" of that spouse, but there are instances in which the community can gain an interest in separate property and even situations in which separate property can be "transmuted" into community property. The rules vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The community property concept originated in civil law jurisdictions but is now also found in some common law jurisdictions. The states of the United States that recognize community property are primarily in the Western United States; it was inherited from Mexico's ganancial community system, which itself was inherited from Spanish law (a Roman-derived civil law system) and ultimately from the Visigothic Code. While under Spanish rule, Louisiana adopted the ganancial community system of acquests and gains, which replaced the traditional French community of movables and acquests in its civil law system.
Views: 1408 The Audiopedia
PRIVATE PROPERTY meaning - PRIVATE PROPERTY definition - How to pronounce PRIVATE PROPERTY
 
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PRIVATE PROPERTY meaning - PRIVATE PROPERTY definition - How to pronounce PRIVATE PROPERTY
Views: 448 The Audiopedia
What is EXEMPT PROPERTY? What does EXEMPT PROPERTY mean? EXEMPT PROPERTY meaning & explanation
 
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What is EXEMPT PROPERTY? What does EXEMPT PROPERTY mean? EXEMPT PROPERTY meaning - EXEMPT PROPERTY definition - EXEMPT PROPERTY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Exempt property, under the law of property in many jurisdictions, is property that can neither be passed by will nor claimed by creditors of the deceased in the event that a decedent leaves a surviving spouse or surviving descendants. Typically, exempt property includes a family car, and a certain amount of cash (perhaps $10,000-$20,000), or the equivalent value in personal property. Exempt property calculations and provisions are determined on a state-by-state basis. This is important within the bankruptcy process, and may affect an individual's decision to file Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. State exemptions vary from strict to generous. For example, Texas property exemptions are more lenient and include your homestead and up to $60,000 in personal property. Texas also exempts certain investments and insurance policies. Other states, such as Arizona, may exempt only $150 in a checking account comparatively speaking.
Views: 122 The Audiopedia
The Law You Won't Be Told
 
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Official Discussion on http://www.reddit.com/r/CGPGrey/comments/1xpn9c/the_law_you_wont_be_told_grey_explains/ http://www.CGPGrey.com/ https://subbable.com/cgpgrey Special thanks: McSteed TV: https://www.youtube.com/mcsteedinc Scott Weinberg: http://michigancriminallawyerspc.com @ryannamba tfpauly Martin Fixman Yhson44 Gidister Tom Jefferson Lisa Lyons @thesteveewin Chris Vogt Sebastián Andreas Margery Monge Jordan Hunter Jackson Nary Weis Dan Lapsley Audrius Zujus Ian Holliday Chris Farquhar Becca Rickwood Sean Murphy @seanbob4444 on twitter! Nicholas Hartikainen Timothy LaDuca ESKN Racketen Don C Ludtke @donludtke Alex Quinn Colby Patterson Jordan Hunter Jackson Richard Williams @simoneconnola Clay Compton Alex (NegativeZer0) Perelgut
Views: 8086212 CGP Grey
What is LITERARY PROPERTY? What does LITERARY PROPERTY mean? LITERARY PROPERTY meaning & explanation
 
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What is LITERARY PROPERTY? What does LITERARY PROPERTY mean? LITERARY PROPERTY meaning - LITERARY PROPERTY definition - LITERARY PROPERTY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Literary property is a term used in publishing to refer to works generally covered by copyright but also an associated set of property rights that go far beyond what courts have historically permitted to be claimed as copyright infringement. The Writers Guild of America, for instance, uses this term exclusively to refer to works registered with its WGA script registration service, so as not to restrict the claims it or its users can make regarding their rights. Since it applies only to literary works and not technological or social constructs such as are covered by patent or trademark law, the term is much narrower in scope than the hotly contested term "intellectual property" sometimes used to refer to all non-physical works in which property rights are recognized. Among other differences, in literary works a very specific concept of attribution is a critical part of the work itself - works tend to become markedly less valued or more valued based upon who originated or created it, which is simply not the case for inventions or brand names. Also, most countries recognize moral rights that are not alienable from the work, that is, a purchaser of rights in the work does not have the right to relabel it as if someone else had written it. While the USA does not recognize moral rights, it does have complex de facto standards such as the WGA screenwriting credit system which are actually more demanding and rigorous in specific industries.
Views: 48 The Audiopedia
What is INTANGIBLE PROPERTY? What does INTANGIBLE PROPERTY mean? INTANGIBLE PROPERTY meaning
 
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What is INTANGIBLE PROPERTY? What does INTANGIBLE PROPERTY mean? INTANGIBLE PROPERTY meaning. Intangible property, also known as incorporeal property, describes something which a person or corporation can have ownership of and can transfer ownership to another person or corporation, but has no physical substance, for example brand identity or knowledge/intellectual property. It generally refers to statutory creations such as copyright, trademarks, or patents. It excludes tangible property like real property (land, buildings, and fixtures) and personal property (ships, automobiles, tools, etc.). In some jurisdictions intangible property are referred to as choses in action. Intangible property is used in distinction to tangible property. It is useful to note that there are two forms of intangible property: legal intangible property (which is discussed here) and competitive intangible property (which is the source from which legal intangible property is created but cannot be owned, extinguished, or transferred). Competitive intangible property disobeys the intellectual property test of voluntary extinguishment and therefore results in the sources that create intellectual property (knowledge in its source form, collaboration, process-engagement, etc.) escaping quantification. Generally, ownership of intangible property gives the owner a set of legally enforceable rights over reproduction of personal property containing certain content. For example, a copyright owner can control the reproduction of the work forming the copyright. However, the intangible property forms a set of rights separate from the tangible property that carries the rights. For example, the owner of a copyright can control the printing of books containing the content, but the book itself is personal property which can be bought and sold without concern over the rights of the copyright holder. In English law and other Commonwealth legal systems, intangible property is traditionally divided in pure intangibles (such as debts, intellectual property rights and goodwill) and documentary intangibles, which obtain their character through the medium of a document (such as a bill of lading, promissory note or bill of exchange). The recent rise of electronic documents has blurred the distinction between pure intangibles and documentary intangibles.
Views: 580 The Audiopedia
Can Laws Be Simple? [Introduction to Common Law]
 
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Can the Common Law be reduced to a series of simple rules? Professor Richard Epstein of NYU School of Law argues “yes," even in spite of the complexity of modern society. Professor Epstein provides an alternative to the conventional view that property rights are arbitrarily created by the state, and therefore can be changed at will by the state; a few simple rules, he argues, are universal principles of social organization, consistent across time and culture, which form the basis of social gains. Professor Epstein is the inaugural Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law at NYU School of Law, a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, and Professor of Law Emeritus and a senior lecturer at the University of Chicago. As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker. Subscribe to the series’ playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLWwcngsYgoUX3i5tMPI9kDQtoLuOXCsN_ Related links: Richard Epstein: Simple Rules for a Complex World http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674808218&content=reviews
Views: 44786 The Federalist Society
What is QUASI-PROPERTY? What does QUASI PROPERTY mean? QUASI PROPERTY meaning & explanation
 
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What is QUASI-PROPERTY? What does QUASI PROPERTY mean? QUASI PROPERTY meaning - QUASI-PROPERTY definition - QUASI-PROPERTY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Quasi-property is a legal concept, in which some rights similar to ownership may accrue to a party who does an act which benefits society as a whole. Black's Law Dictionary defines "quasi" as being "almost" or "resembling" - but not actually the same as the suffix item. Property Law gives the owner of real property or personal property a "bundle of rights" for beneficial use, such as the right to sell the property or right to lifetime use of the property. A notable and early occurrence of quasi-property being found by a court under American law was the case of International News Service v. Associated Press. The Associated Press Sued International News Service for taking the substance of AP news stories, rewriting the articles, and publishing the stories in its own member newspapers. This activity did not violate copyright law because the original AP articles were not copyrighted, and also because the subsequent INS articles copied only the facts— using different language to report the story. Nonetheless, the Court recognized an interest in the news distributor of information they had researched and gathered. A traditional property right would have granted the AP a right to exclude others from the content of their news stories good for all time and against everyone. The court described this new right as quasi-property because it only granted them the power to exclude their competitors for a limited amount of time from the substance of their articles. The general public had free rein to distribute the subject matter of the news without restriction. Creation of the new right was justified as protecting the AP from the "unfair competition" of a party who was reproducing the information and attempting to profit by distributing it faster than the creator. Another prominent example of quasi-property under US law is the continuing ownership of a person's right to publicity even after death.
Views: 252 The Audiopedia
Episode 1.2: An Overview of Tort Law – Intentional Torts, Negligence, and Strict Liability
 
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Professor Lindsay Wiley from American University Washington College of Law opens up Torts with a brief overview of the three main types of torts. Script was written by Prof. Lindsay Wiley, narration was done by Jackie Morrison, and visuals by Aaron Dewald
What Is The Meaning Of Conjugal Property?
 
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Views: 716 Laath Laath
Episode 1.1: What is Torts? And what Torts is not.
 
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Professor Lindsay Wiley from American University Washington College of Law introduces Torts. This is the first in a series of videos. Script by: Prof. Lindsay Wiley. Visuals by: Aaron Dewald. Narration by: Jacqueline Morrison
What is STIGMATIZED PROPERTY? What does STIGMATIZED PROPERTY mean? STIGMATIZED PROPERTY meaning
 
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What is STIGMATIZED PROPERTY? What does STIGMATIZED PROPERTY mean? STIGMATIZED PROPERTY meaning - STIGMATIZED PROPERTY definition - STIGMATIZED PROPERTY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ In real estate, stigmatized property is property which buyers or tenants may shun for reasons that are unrelated to its physical condition or features. These can include death of an occupant, murder, suicide, serious illness such as AIDS, and belief that a house is haunted. Controversy exists regarding the definitions of stigma and what sorts of stigma must be disclosed at sale, with local jurisdictions varying widely in their interpretation of these issues. It is argued that the seller has a duty to disclose any such history of the property. This, in practice, falls into two categories: demonstrable (physical) as well as emotional. These guidelines vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Many jurisdictions recognize several forms of stigmatized property, and have passed resolutions or statutes to deal with them. One issue that separates them is disclosure. Depending on the jurisdiction of the house, the seller may not be required to disclose the full facts. Some specific types must always be disclosed, others are up to the jurisdiction, and still others up to the realtor. The types include: Criminal stigma: the property was used in the ongoing commission of a crime. For example, a house is stigmatized if it has been used as a brothel, chop shop, or drug den. In the case of drug dens, some drug addicts may inadvertently come to the address expecting to purchase illegal drugs. Most jurisdictions require full disclosure of this sort of element. Debt stigma: Debt collectors unaware that a debtor has moved out of a particular residence may continue their pursuit at the same location, resulting in harassment of innocent subsequent occupiers. This is particularly pronounced if the collection agency uses aggressive or illegal tactics. Minimal stigma is known to, or taken seriously by, only a small select group, and such a stigma is unlikely to affect the ability to sell the property; in such a case, realtors may decide to disclose this information in a case-by-case basis. Murder/suicide stigma: Some jurisdictions in the United States require property sellers to reveal if murder or suicide occurred on the premises. California state law does if the event occurred within the previous three years. To protect sellers from lawsuits, Florida state law does not require any notification. In North Carolina, sellers and agents do not have to volunteer information about the death of previous occupants, but a direct question must be answered truthfully. Phenomena stigma: Many (but not all) jurisdictions require disclosure if a house is renowned for "haunting", ghost sightings, etc. This is in a separate category from public stigma, wherein the knowledge of "haunting" is restricted to a local market. Public stigma : when the stigma is known to a wide selection of the population and any reasonable person can be expected to know of it. Examples include the Amityville Horror house and the home of the Menendez brothers. Public stigma must always be disclosed, in almost all American and European jurisdictions. At least in the United States, the principle of caveat emptor ("let the buyer beware") was held for many years to govern sales. As the idea of an implied warranty of habitability began to find purchase, however, issues like the stigma attached to a property based on acts, "haunting", or criminal activity began to make their way into legal precedents. In Stambovsky v. Ackley the New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division, affirmed a narrow interpretation of the idea of stigmatized property. The court held that since the property in question was previously marketed by the seller as a "haunted house" he was estopped from claiming the contrary. The majority opinion specifically noted that the veracity of the claims of paranormal activities were outside the purview of the opinion. Notwithstanding these conclusions, the court affirmed the dismissal of the fraudulent misrepresentation action and stated that the realtor was under no duty to disclose the haunting to potential buyers. Several states have created specific statutes in the US adding "stigmatised property" verbiage to their legal code....
Views: 105 The Audiopedia
Intellectual Property
 
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What’s Intellectual Property got to do with you?
Views: 43620 DurhamUniversity
What is PROPERTY ABSTRACT? What does PROPERTY ABSTRACT mean? PROPERTY ABSTRACT meaning & explanation
 
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What is PROPERTY ABSTRACT? What does PROPERTY ABSTRACT mean? PROPERTY ABSTRACT meaning - PROPERTY ABSTRACT definition - PROPERTY ABSTRACT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A property abstract is a collection of legal documents that chronicle transactions associated with a particular parcel of land. Generally included are references to deeds, mortgages, wills, probate records, court litigations, and tax sales—basically, any legal document that affects the property. The abstract will show the names of all property owners, how long a particular holder owned it, and the price of the land when it was sold. Rarely will an abstract mention capital improvements to the property. Property abstracts are considered good starting places for research on historical buildings. An abstract of title is the condensed history of the title to a particular parcel of real estate, consisting of a summary of the original grant and all subsequent conveyances and encumbrances affecting the property and a certification by the abstractor that the history is complete and accurate. In the United States, the abstract of title furnishes the raw data for the preparation of a policy of title insurance for the parcel of land in question. In Iowa, commercial title insurance is outlawed, so title insurance policies are issued by Iowa Title Guaranty, an Iowa state government agency. An abstract of title should be distinguished from an opinion of title. While an abstract states that all of the public record documents concerning the property in question are contained therein, an opinion states the professional judgment of the person giving the opinion as to the vesting of the title and other matters concerning the chain of title. Many jurisdictions define the giving of an opinion of title as the practice of law, thus making it unlawful for a non-attorney to provide such an opinion.
Views: 301 The Audiopedia
What is IMMOVABLE PROPERTY? What does IMMOVABLE PROPERTY mean? IMMOVABLE PROPERTY meaning
 
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What is IMMOVABLE PROPERTY? What does IMMOVABLE PROPERTY mean? IMMOVABLE PROPERTY meaning - IMMOVABLE PROPERTY definition -IMMOVABLE PROPERTY explanation. Immovable property is an immovable object, an item of property that cannot be moved without destroying or altering it - property that is fixed to the earth, such as land or a house. In the United States it is also commercially and legally known as real estate and in Britain as property. It is known by other terms in other countries of the world. Immovable property includes premises, property rights (for example, inheritable building right), houses, land and associated goods, and chattels if they are located on, or below, or have a fixed address. It is delimited by geographic coordinates or by reference to local landmarks, depending on the jurisdiction. In much of the world's civil law systems (based as they are on Romano-Germanic law, which is also known as Civil law or Continental law), immovable property is the equivalent of "real property"; it is land or any permanent feature or structure above or below the surface. To describe it in more detail, immovable property includes land, buildings, hereditary allowances, rights to way, lights, ferries, fisheries or any other benefit which arises out of land, and things attached to the earth or permanently fastened to anything which is attached to the earth. It does not include standing timber, growing crops, nor grass. It includes the right to collect rent, life interest in the income of the immovable property, a right of way, a fishery, or a lease of land. Other sources describe immovable property as "any land or any building or part of a building, and includes, where any land or any building or part of a building is to be transferred together with any machinery, plant, furniture, fittings or other things, such machinery, plant, furniture, fittings and other things also. Any rights in or with respect to any land or any building or part of building (whether or not including any machinery, plant, furniture, fittings or other things therein) which has been constructed or which is to be constructed, accruing or arising from any transaction (whether by way of becoming a member of, or acquiring shares in, a co-operative society, or other association of persons) or by way of any agreement or any arrangement of whatever nature, not being a transaction by way of sale, exchange or lease of such land, building or part of a building." Immovable property cannot be altered or remodeled, added to, or reconstructed without entering into an agreement with and getting permission from its owner. Construction, alteration, and demolition may also be subject to government regulation, such as the need to obey zoning laws and obtain building permits. Also, a property or an object, which can be moved by destroying it would be considered a "destructible property" rather than an "immovable property".
Views: 1816 The Audiopedia
INDIAN Partnership ACT    MEANING OF Property of Firm     SECTION  14
 
26:08
section 14 explained word by word ... very important for exams , goodwill i s property of firm
Views: 827 Prof. LK Soni
POLITICAL THEORY - John Locke
 
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John Locke's greatness as a philosopher is based on his theories on childhood, his work on religious toleration and his concept of the rights of citizens. He helped to make us who we are. If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Reflective films http://www.reflectivefilms.co.uk #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 902540 The School of Life
What is INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY? What does INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY mean? INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY meaning
 
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What is INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY? What does INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY mean? INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY meaning. Intellectual property (IP) is a term referring to creations of the intellect for which a monopoly is assigned to designated owners by law. Some common types of intellectual property rights (IPR) are trademarks, copyright, patents, industrial design rights, and in some jurisdictions trade secrets: all these cover music, literature, and other artistic works; discoveries and inventions; and words, phrases, symbols, and designs. While intellectual property law has evolved over centuries, it was not until the 19th century that the term intellectual property began to be used, and not until the late 20th century that it became commonplace in the majority of the world.
Views: 3620 The Audiopedia
Law of Attraction simplified by Sadhguru
 
27:22
Law of attraction by sadhguru Law of attraction law of attraction meditation,law of attraction money law of attraction love Other video law of attraction and manifestation -Sadhguru https://youtu.be/F_JgfR0q-nk #lawofattraction #lawofattractionsadhguru #howtouselawofattraction #sadhguru #myplanetdiary
Views: 2115387 My Planet Diary
Tony Stark "You Want My Property, You Can't Have It" Scene | Iron Man 2 (2010) Movie Clip
 
04:20
Tony Stark Court Scene | Iron Man 2 (2010) Movie info: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1228705/ Buy it on Blu-ray: https://www.amazon.com/Iron-Man-Blu-ray-Robert-Downey/dp/B01EY1IXV8 Starring: Robert Downey Jr, Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Scarlett Johansson, Mickey Rourke, Sam Rockwell, Samuel L. Jackson, Jon Favreau, Clark Gregg -------------------------------------------------- ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/filmicbox ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/filmicbox ► Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/filmicbox ► Google+: https://plus.google.com/109939716731213840534 -------------------------------------------------- *** TM & © Marvel / Disney / Paramount (2010) Monetized by owner/s. Their ads Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. No copyright infringement intended. *** Tony Stark Court Scene 4K Ultra HD https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuGtSnFs0lbb7Loo0WeKmVQ
Views: 13459993 Scopian01
section 5 of transfer of property Act 1882
 
03:55
i have made it through simple and easier way. and I am tying to bring something interesting and informative relating law. i will be glad to read your comments in comment box. and kindly subscribe my channel.
Views: 57 Rahmatullah Baloch
The Ideal Gas Law: Crash Course Chemistry #12
 
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Gases are everywhere, and this is good news and bad news for chemists. The good news: when they are behaving themselves, it's extremely easy to describe their behavior theoretically, experimentally and mathematically. The bad news is they almost never behave themselves. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank tells how the work of some amazing thinkers combined to produce the Ideal Gas Law, how none of those people were Robert Boyle, and how the ideal gas equation allows you to find out pressure, volume, temperature or number of moles. You'll also get a quick introduction to a few jargon-y phrases to help you sound like you know what you're talking about. Table of Contents Ideal Gas Law Equation 0:50 Everyone But Robert Boyle 1:35 Ideal Gas Law to Figure Out Things 6:16 Jargon Fun Time 7:46 Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1402824 CrashCourse
Natural Law Theory: Crash Course Philosophy #34
 
09:39
Our exploration of ethical theories continues with another theistic answer to the grounding problem: natural law theory. Thomas Aquinas’s version of this theory says that we all seek out what’s known as the basic goods and argued that instinct and reason come together to point us to the natural law. There are, of course, objections to this theory – in particular, the is-ought problem advanced by David Hume. Get your own Crash Course Philosophy mug or Chom Chom shirt from DFTBA: https://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 656715 CrashCourse
SECTION 22 HINDI "Meaning of house property & Its Chargeability ” | HOUSE PROPERTY INCOME TAX-Part 1
 
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In this video, you will learn about Section 22 of House Property. What is the meaning of House Property and Chargeability on income under house property?
Views: 773 Munim Ji
Intellectual property Meaning
 
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Video is created with the help of wikipedia, if you are looking for accurate, professional translation services and efficient localization you can use Universal Translation Services https://www.universal-translation-services.com?ap_id=ViragGNG Video shows what intellectual property means. Any product of someone's intellect that has commercial value: a piece of literature, a painting, an invention, a trademark a trade secret, etc. Works protected under intellectual property law, and accorded intellectual property rights such as copyrights and patents.. Intellectual property Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say intellectual property. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 1168 SDictionary
What is COMMERCIAL PROPERTY? What does COMMERCIAL PROPERTY mean? COMMERCIAL PROPERTY meaning
 
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What is COMMERCIAL PROPERTY? What does COMMERCIAL PROPERTY mean? COMMERCIAL PROPERTY meaning - COMMERCIAL PROPERTY definition - COMMERCIAL PROPERTY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. The term commercial property (also called commercial real estate, investment or income property) refers to buildings or land intended to generate a profit, either from capital gain or rental income. Property used in such a manner as to make money. From renting spaces for flea market; to building an office building to run your business out of. Commercial property includes office buildings, industrial property, medical centers, hotels, malls, retail stores, farm land, multifamily housing buildings, warehouses, and garages. In many states, residential property containing more than a certain number of units qualifies as commercial property for borrowing and tax purposes. Commercial real estate is commonly divided into six categories: 1. Office Buildings – This category includes single-tenant properties, small professional office buildings, downtown skyscrapers, and everything in between. 2. Industrial – This category ranges from smaller properties, often called "Flex" or "R&D" properties, to larger office service or office warehouse properties to the very large "big box" industrial properties. An important, defining characteristic of industrial space is Clear Height. Clear height is the actual height, to the bottom of the steel girders in the interior of the building. This might be 14–16 feet for smaller properties, and 40+ feet for larger properties. We also consider the type and number of docks that the property has. These can be Grade Level, where the parking lot and the warehouse floor are on the same level, to semi-dock height at 24 inches, which is the height of a pickup truck or delivery truck, or a full-dock at 48 inches which is semi-truck height. Some buildings may even have a rail spur for train cars to load and unload. 3. Retail/Restaurant – This category includes pad sites on highway frontages, single tenant retail buildings, small neighborhood shopping centers, larger centers with grocery store anchor tenants, "power centers" with large anchor stores such as Best Buy, PetSmart, OfficeMax, and so on even regional and outlet malls. 4. Multifamily – This category includes apartment complexes or high-rise apartment buildings. Generally, anything larger than a fourplex is considered commercial real estate. 5. Land – This category includes investment properties on undeveloped, raw, rural land in the path of future development. Or, infill land with an urban area, pad sites, and more. 6. Miscellaneous – This catch all category would include any other nonresidential properties such as hotel, hospitality, medical, and self-storage developments, as well as many more.
Views: 1463 The Audiopedia
What legal rights does a patent give you?
 
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Intellectual property law governs and regulates ownership rights as to the virtual creations of the human mind. Intellectual property law protects a creator by bestowing property rights over his/her virtual creations. Like a patent, trademark and copyright. Basically, a patent is a piece of property just like a house or a bank account. A patent is a piece of property that can be sold or assigned to another person or entity like a corporations. A patent gives the holder the right to stop others from using, making or selling the patented product. So a patent does not give the owner of the patent the right to use it, but the right to stop others from using it. The patent gives the patent owner a monopoly on the specific product or process for about 20 years. Then after the patent expires is goes into the public domain and anyone can freely use it. The idea is that society as a whole will benefit from the sharing of ideas. And the person that invented will benefit by being the first one alone to market the product or method. If an invention is useful, novel or is non-obvious to one having ordinary skill in the art at the time the invention was made, it is patentable. In order to get a patent you have to be the first person to file a patent application. An inventor should file a patent application before using it in public. Do not make costly mistakes get the proper legal guidance on how to file a patent application. Hire me and you will get your patent filed fast, correctly and cost effectively the first time. Remember form is easy, short and simple. And you never have to worry about hidden fees. Call my cellphone and you can stop others from profiting from your good idea. Contact registered patent attorney Vin LoTempio at (800) 866-0039. This 800 number rings directly to my cell phone. Remember, good ideas are worth protecting! Free 15 minute Consultations: 1 (800) 866-0039 Email: [email protected] Web: https://www.lotempiolaw.com File A Patent: https://www.lotempiolaw.com/patent File A Trademark: https://www.lotempiolaw.com/trademark YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/PatentHome Twitter: https://twitter.com/LoTempio Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LoTempio.vg ATTORNEY ADVERTISEMENT
Views: 197 PatentHome
Should I Get Insurance Cover when entering a Property Contract? Onsite Conveyancing
 
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http://www.onsiteconveyancing.com.au Should I Get Insurance Cover when entering a contract to buy a property?
Views: 85 Onsite Law
What is Meaning of Property Meaning of Property in Hindi by Mandeep Randhawa
 
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What is Meaning of Property Meaning of Property in Hindi by Mandeep Randhawa
What is LANDED PROPERTY? What does LANDED PROPERTY mean? LANDED PROPERTY meaning & explanation
 
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What is LANDED PROPERTY? What does LANDED PROPERTY mean? LANDED PROPERTY meaning - LANDED PROPERTY definition - LANDED PROPERTY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ In real estate, a landed property or landed estate is a property that generates income for the owner without the owner having to do the actual work of the estate. In medieval Western Europe, there were two competing systems of landed property, on one hand manoralism, inherited from the Roman villa system, where a large estate is owned by the Lord of the Manor and leased to tenants, and on the other hand the family farm or Hof owned by and heritable within a commoner family (c.f. yeoman), inherited from Germanic law. A gentleman farmer is the largely historic term for a country gentleman who has a farm as part of his estate and farms mainly for pleasure rather than for profit. His acreage may vary from under ten to hundreds of acres. The gentleman farmer employed labourers and farm managers. However, according to the 1839 Encyclopedia of Agriculture, he "did not associate with these minor working brethren". The chief source of income for the gentleman farmer was derived not from any income that his landed property may generate; he had either access to his own private income, he worked as a professional and/or he owned a large business elsewhere. Or all three. Modern landed property often consists of housing or industrial land, generating income in the form of rents or fees for services provided by the facilities on the land, such as port facilities. Owners often commission an estate map to help manage their estate as well as serving as a status symbol. Landed property was a key element of feudalism, and freed the owner for other tasks, such as government administration, military service, the practice of Law, or religious practices. In later times, the dominant role of landed estates as a basis of public service faded. Development of manufacturing and commerce created capitalist means of obtaining income, but ordinarily demanding the attention of the owner; at roughly the same time, governments began imposing taxes to fund government bureaus and the military so that people of talent could perform government services for salaries without need for the proceeds of ownership of farmland. Parts of the United States of America, typically New England, Pennsylvania, and most of the states west of the original colonies never had a landed aristocracy, so their armed forces and government agencies could never be organized on the basis of a landed aristocracy.
Views: 192 The Audiopedia

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